Donner Amy and DuaneThe Collat School of Business recently received a $125,000 gift from Amy and Duane Donner for its Healthcare Leadership Academy. Founded in 2009, the academy is a joint collaboration between the Collat School of Business and  the School of Medicine, and it has helped the university retain promising health-focused faculty and staff. The academy’s mission is to identify and develop future leaders of the UAB academic medical center. 

 
online degrees
U.S. News & World Report recently acknowledged the University of Alabama at Birmingham Collat School of Business’ online master’s degrees as top national programs.

The programs were rated 17th in its 2015 Best Online Programs rankings, which were released this past week. UAB is one of 118 schools to be included in the rankings this year.

 

Simon awardDr. Simon Sheng was awarded the Steven J. Shaw Best Paper in Conference at The Society for Marketing Advances (SMA) 2014 Annual Conference for his research, “Marketing and R&D Coopetition, Knowledge Integration, and New Product Performance”.

 

“Great business schools have the support of the community that they serve, and being named the Collat School of Business is an example of our relationship with the community,” says Dean Eric Jack.  “We are so very grateful to the Collat family for the transformative gift, and are now asking you to be part of something big and help us succeed because we’re helping others succeed.”

bldg int 315Medical Properties Trust, Inc. has donated $1 million to the University of Alabama at Birmingham to serve as a lead gift in funding a new state-of-the-art building for the Collat School of Business and the Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

Collat Faculty and StaffThe faculty and staff of the Collat School of Business have displayed a standard of giving that is exactly what The Campaign for UAB is all about, working together to make UAB the best.

The Collat School of Business launched an internal push to gain as much participation in its faculty and staff campaign as possible and, within only months of setting that goal, reached 99 percent participation.

shengSimon Sheng, Ph.D., associate professor of marketing in the Collat School of Business, advises manufacturers and supply-chain managers to better define relationships with suppliers and business partners based on recent study findings.

The acquisition, assimilation, and exploitation of heterogeneous, valuable knowledge-based resources contribute critically to a firm’s competitive advantage and superior performance. Research in supply chain and strategic management further indicates that abnormal returns derive not only from resources within a firm but also from those outside of the firm’s boundaries. Attaining such external resources often involves acquiring knowledge from external ties.  In supply chain management area, researchers have highlighted the positive role of relational ties in fostering performance and knowledge acquisition. Increased socialization between the buyer and supplier contributes to the creation of relational capital that leads to deeper interfirm communication and knowledge sharing. However, recent supply chain management research cautions about the potential dark side of highly embedded ties, which may become a source of blindness that restrict information flows and even bring in the risk of opportunistic exploitation that hurts knowledge flows. Thus it remains unclear whether relational ties facilitate or inhibit knowledge flows between embedded parties.

Simon

Dr. Simon Sheng and his colleagues address this controversy by studying the following questions:

What is the real relationship between inter-firm relational ties and knowledge sharing between the two firms? Does the shape of the relationship depend on the strength of the ties?

As an informal governance mechanism, how do relational ties interact with formal governance mechanism, i.e., inter-organizational contracts, to influence knowledge acquisition between two firms?

How does the industrial context surrounding the inter-firm exchanges ( i.e., industrial competitive intensity) influence the impact of relational ties on knowledge acquisition?

 
laptopA researcher from the UAB's Department of Management, Information Systems and Quantitative Methods recently published a paper on the innovation potential of businesses’ using open source software communities.

The paper, from Paul Di Gangi, Ph.D., assistant professor of information systems, and titled “Balancing on a tightrope: Managing the boundaries of a firm-sponsored OSS community and its impact on innovation and absorptive capacity,” was published in the January issue of Information and Organization.