Course Descriptions

Chemistry Graduate Course List

500-Level Courses
600-Level Courses
700-Level Courses

Chemistry (CH)

CH 525. Physical Chemistry I for Graduate Study. Thermodynamics and chemical equilibria; and chemical kinetics. Prerequisites: Calculus II, College Physics II, and General Chemistry II. 3 hours.

CH 526. Physical Chemistry II for Graduate Study. Quantum mechanics, chemical bonding, and molecular spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Calculus II, College Physics II, and General Chemistry II. 3 hours.

CH 535. Organic Chemistry I for Graduate Study. Structure, nomenclature, properties, and reactivity of compounds with various organic functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halidesand alcohols. Emphasis on the mechanisms of organic reactions and problem solving.. Prerequisite: General Chemistry II. 3 hours

CH 537. Organic Chemistry II for Graduate Study. Reactions of aromatic compounds and carbonyl containing functional groups: aldehydes, ketones, acids, esters and amides. Molecules of biological interest, such as proteins and carbohydrates. Prerequisite: CH 535 or Organic Chemistry I. 3 hours

CH 540. Inorganic Chemistry I for Graduate Study. Systematic coverage of descriptive chemistry. Chemical reactivity using structural and electronic parameters. Development of chemical understanding and intuition of elements and their compounds, as well as industrial and environmental applications. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry II and laboratory with a grade of C or better and concurrent enrollment in CH 540L. 4 hours.

CH 540L. Inorganic Chemistry I for Graduate Study Laboratory. Laboratory to accompany CH 540 (Inorganic Chemistry I for Graduate Study). Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in CH 540.

CH 541. Transition Metal Chemistry. Relationship between bonding, structure, and properties of compounds including reactions, mechanisms, and catalysis of organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: Inorganic Chemistry and Physical Chemistry II. 3 hours.

CH 550. Instrumental Analysis for Graduate Study. Focus on modern analytical chemistry instrumentation including chemical separations, spectroscopies (atomic absorption, infrared, UV-visible, fluorescence), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and thermal analysis. Laboratory correlated with lecture material. Prerequisite: Quantitative Analysis Techniques. 4 hours. .

CH 550L.Instrumental Analysis for Graduate Study Laboratory. Laboratory to accompany CH 550 (Instrumental Analysis for Graduate Study). Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in CH 550.

CH 555. Quantitative Analysis Techniques for Graduate Study. Principles of analytical measurements, gravimetric analysis, spectrophotometric analysis, and chromatography, with emphasis on equilibrium and applications. Lecture and laboratory. 4 hours.

CH 555L. Quantitative Analysis Techniques for Graduate Study Laboratory. Laboratory to accompany CH 555 (Quantitative Analysis for Graduate Study). Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in CH 555.

CH 560. Fundamentals of Biochemistry. Overview of biochemical principles; chemistry of aqueous solutions, biochemical building blocks including amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleotides; structure and function of proteins, membranes, and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics. Catabolic and anabolic metabolism of biomolecules, regulation of metabolic processes. Application of clinical correlations of metabolism to human nutrition and disease. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry II with a grade of C or better. 3 hours.

CH 561. Advanced Biochemistry I : Advanced study of protein structure and function, enzymology, DNA structure, prokaryotic replication, transcription, and protein synthesis. Membrane structure and function, carbohydrate structure and function. Methods for isolating and characterizing macromolecule structure and function including chromatography, gel electrophoresis, CD, UV, and fluorescence spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prerequisites: Successful completion of CHEM 560 with C or better.

CH 562. Advanced Biochemistry II. Continuation of Advanced Biochemistry I focusing on eukaryotic replication, transcription, translation, regulation of gene expression, genomics, proteomics, biological signaling. Prerequisites: Successful completion of CHEM 561.

CH 563. Biochemistry Laboratory. Introduction to modern bioanalytical techniques used for the expression, isolation and characterization of proteins and other biological macromolecules. Prerequisites: Quantitative Analysis and Biochemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 564. Physical Biochemistry Laboratory. Physical/analytical approaches (including mass spectroscopy and NMR) toward determination of macromolecular structures, ligand binding, and enzymology. Prerequisites: Background in physical chemistry I and II, quantitative analysis, and biochemistry. Permission of instructor required.

CH 565. Structural Biochemistry. Principles of macromolecular structure, emphasizing proteins, nucleic acidsacids, and macromolecular assemblies. Computational methods used to teach principles and modeling software used for construction of computer models of proteins and nucleic acids. Lecture and computer Laboratory. Prerequisites: Background in physical chemistry I and II, quantitative analysis, and biochemistry. Permission of instructor required. 3 hours.

CH 571. Medicinal Chemistry & Drug Discovery. Anadvanced organic course with emphasis on design strategies for discovering small organic molecule drugs using common macromolecular drug targets. Examples of successful design for clinically used drug classes will be presented. Prerequisites include undergraduate organic chemistry and undergraduate biochemistry. 3 hours.

CH 572. Chemistry of Natural Products. A one-semester advanced organic chemistry course that provides an introduction to the broad field of the major classes of natural products chemistry and includes insights on isolation, structure, properties, synthesis, biological targets, and importance in medical applications.Prerequisites: include undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 573. Electron Pushing and Total Synthesis. The advanced organic course is aimed to enhance students’ comprehension of advanced organic chemistry theory and principles, and apply them to understand reaction mechanisms and tactic of total synthesis. It will cover different types of common organic reactions each week, for example, reactions involving anion intermediates, cation intermediates, rearrangement, photochemical process, carbonyl compounds, and other reactive intermediates. Using electron pushing for mechanistic reasoning will be emphasized. Prerequisites: include undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 574. X-Ray Crystallography. Fundamental principles of X-ray crystallography. Students gain enough information to be able to collect meaningful data and analyze and refine structures. Students learn how to collect, process and analyze x-ray data, focus on heavy atom phasing techniques and use state of the art software for refinement. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
 
CH 580. Polymer Chemistry I. Basic chemical principles of polymers with the focus on synthesis, characterization, and applications of synthetic and biological macromolecules. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor and concurrent enrollment in CH 580L.

CH 580L. Polymer Chemistry I Laboratory. Laboratory to accompany CH 680 (Polymer Chemistry I). Concurrent enrollment in CH 580.

CH 581. Polymer Chemistry II. Fundamentals of chemical, physical, and molecular aspects of polymers in bulk and solutions. Prerequisites: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor and concurrent enrollment in CH 580L.

CH 581L. Polymer Chemistry II Laboratory.   Laboratory to accompany CH 681 (Polymer Chemistry II). Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in CH 581.

CH 583. Polymer Chemistry I. Basic chemical principles of polymers with the focus on synthesis, characterization, and applications of synthetic and biological macromolecules. No laboratory is required. Prerequisites: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 584. Polymer Chemistry II. Fundamentals of chemical, physical, and molecular aspects of polymers in bulk and solutions. No laboratory is required. Prerequisites: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 600. Foundations of Physical and Analytical Chemistry. Molecular thermodynamics, molecular reaction dynamics, and chemical equilibria. Ligand binding to macromolecules in aqueous solution.

CH 601. Foundations of Organic and Inorganic Chemistry. Organic – Bonding and structure, concerted pericyclic reactions, stereochemistry, effects of conformation, sterics and electronics on reactivity; and the study of reaction mechanisms with emphasis on nucleophilic substitution. Inorganic – Bonding and structure including basic molecular orbital theory, the solid state, Lewis acid-base chemistry, coordination chemistry, reaction mechanisms for transition metal complexes and characterization of transition metal complexes.

CH 602. Principles of Chemical Instruction. Responsibilities of laboratory instructors, safety regulations, grading, teaching styles and formats, and instructional objectives. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1 hour.

CH 610. Laboratory Experiences in Chemistry I. Course of development, preparation, execution and evaluation of chemical experiments appropriate for high school science programs. Held in collaboration with summer chemistry camps on campus.

CH 611. Laboratory Experiences in Chemistry II. Continuation of CH 610.

CH 612. Polymer Chemistry for Teachers. Lecture and laboratory experiences focusing on natural and synthetic polymers. Morning lectures by polymer chemists with afternoon labs where polymers are synthesized and studied. Emphasis is on practical application and new developments in polymer chemistry. Experiments are suitable for high school science programs.

CH 613. Introductory Organic Chemistry for Teachers. A laboratory, lecture, demonstration course on the nature of carbon compounds including hydrocarbons, functional groups and their reactions. Emphasis given to laboratory experiments and demonstrations suitable for high school students.

CH 614. Introductory Biochemistry for Teachers. Course covering structure, characteristics, biological function, and reactions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Models of implementation of these topics in the classroom are also presented and discussed

CH 615. Introductory Biochemistry for Teachers II. Lecture series covering vitamins, minerals, enzymes, biochemical energy and metabolism. Strong connections between chemistry and biology. Practical applications are emphasized.

CH 616. Chemical Demonstrations. A laboratory-based course exploring the teaching potential of selected chemical reactions. Teachers perform at least 50 demonstrations in the laboratory and share ways they can use these in their own classes. Emphasis on facilitating learning of chemistry.

CH 617. Green Chemistry for High School Teachers.  This course introduces green chemistry concepts and demonstrates laboratory experiments appropriate for the high school classroom.  This is a blended course that requires participation in on-line instruction and on-campus laboratory experiences.

CH 619. Special Topics in Chemical Education. Topics determined by interest of students and faculty.

CH 625. Molecular Structure and Spectroscopy. Classical and quantum mechanical descriptions of molecular structure and bonding. Basic principles and techniques of molecular spectroscopic methods. Exercises and experiments with computational software and spectroscopic instrumentation will be conducted.

CH 629. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. Topics determined by mutual student-faculty interest. Typical are computational chemistry, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance. Prerequisite: CH 600/700 or permission of Instructor. 1 – 3 hours

CH 630. Physical Organic Chemistry. Localized and delocalized chemical bonds, stereochemistry, acidity and basicity, determining organic mechanisms and structure.

CH 631. Organic Reactions and Their Mechanisms. Detailed mechanisms for a variety of synthetically useful reactions including nucleophilic and electrophilic substitution, free radical substitutions, additions to carbon-carbon and carbon-hetero multiple bonds, and elimination reactions. Prerequisite: CH 601/701

CH 632. Organic Reactions and Synthesis. Reactions and strategies for efficient organic synthesis, including carbon skeletal assembly, selective functional group interconversion, protecting groups, stereochemical control. Prerequisite: CH 601.

CH 633. Reactive Intermediates and Conservation of Bonding. Behavior of organic molecules in static and reactive situations. Prerequisite: CH 731 or permission of instructor.

CH 639. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry. Topics determined by interest of students and faculty. Prerequisite: CH 632. 1-3 hours.

CH 642. Organometallic Chemistry and Catalysis. Study of transition metal organometallic compounds and their applications as homogeneous catalysts for organic and polymer syntheses. Prerequisite: CH 640 or 740 or permission of instructor.

CH 649. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Topics determined by interest of students and faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-3 hours.

CH 651. Chemometrics. Introduction to basic data analysis techniques that include testing hypotheses, establishing tendencies and correlations, experimental design, etc. The course is designed to provide a support to a research chemist in effectively solving everyday problems associated with production and interpretation of experimental data. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CH 659. Thermal processes and methods. Introduction to thermally initiated physical and chemical processes in the condensed phase systems such as liquids, crystalline solids, and glasses (amorphous solids). The course covers the use of calorimetry, thermogravimetry, and thermomechanical methods for exploring thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallization, glass transition, solid-solid and helix-coil transitions, decomposition, polymerization. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CH 660. Fundamentals of Biochemistry. Overview of biochemical principles; chemistry of aqueous solutions, biochemical building blocks including amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleotides; structure and function of proteins, membranes, and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics. Catabolic and anabolic metabolism of biomolecules, regulation of metabolic processes. Application of clinical correlations of metabolism to human nutrition and disease. Prerequisite: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 661. Advanced Biochemistry I. Anin-depth examination of the biochemical, biophysical, and enzymology of processes including molecular genetics (DNA replication, transcription, and protein synthesis), bioenergetics, and protein structure, folding, and energetics.Prerequisite: 660.

CH 662. Advanced Biochemistry II. Continuation of biochemistry including molecular genetics (replication, transcription, and translation), metabolic pathways, control of gene expression. Prerequisite: 661.

CH 663. Biochemistry Laboratory. Introduction to modern bioanalytical techniques used for the expression, isolation and characterization of proteins and other biological macromolecules. Prerequisites: CH 660 and permission of instructor.

CH 664. Biophysical Chemistry. Physical/analytical approaches (including mass spectroscopy and NMR) toward determination of macromolecular structures, ligand binding, and enzymology. Prerequisites: CH 660 and permission of instructor.

CH 669. Special Topics in Biochemistry. Detailed consideration of areas of special interest. Prerequisite: CH 660 and permission of instructor.

CH 671. Medicinal Chemistry & Drug Discovery. An advanced organic course with emphasis on design strategies for discovering small organic molecule drugs using common macromolecular drug targets. Examples of successful design for clinically used drug classes will be presented. Prerequisites include undergraduate organic chemistry and undergraduate biochemistry.

CH 672. Chemistry of Natural Products. A one-semester advanced organic chemistry course that provides an introduction to the broad field of the major classes of natural products chemistry and includes insights on isolation, structure, properties, synthesis, biological targets, and importance in medical applications. Prerequisites: include undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 673. Electron Pushing and Total synthesis. Anadvanced organic course aimed to enhance students’ comprehension of advanced organic chemistry theory and principles, and apply them to understand reaction mechanisms and tactic of total synthesis. It will cover different types of common organic reactions each week, for example, reactions involving anion intermediates, cation intermediates, rearrangement, photochemical process, carbonyl compounds, and other reactive intermediates. Using electron pushing for mechanistic reasoning will be emphasized. Prerequisites: include undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 674. XRay Crystallography. Fundamental principles of X-ray crystallography. Students gain enough information to be able to collect meaningful data and analyze and refine structures. Students learn how to collect, process and and analyze x-ray data, focus on heavy atom phasing techniques and use state of the art software for refinement. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CH 680. Polymer Chemistry I. Basic chemical principles of polymers with the focus on synthesis, characterization, and applications of synthetic and biological macromolecules. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor and concurrent enrollment in CH 680L.

CH 680L. Polymer Chemistry I Laboratory. Laboratory to accompany CH 680 (Polymer Chemistry I). Concurrent enrollment in CH 680.

CH 681. Polymer Chemistry II. Fundamentals of chemical, physical, and molecular aspects of polymers in bulk and solutions. Prerequisites: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor and concurrent enrollment in CH 680L.

CH 681L. Polymer Chemistry II Laboratory. Laboratory to accompany CH 681 (Polymer Chemistry II). Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in CH 681.

CH 683. Polymer Chemistry I. Basic chemical principles of polymers with the focus on synthesis, characterization, and applications of synthetic and biological macromolecules. No laboratory is required. Prerequisites: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 684. Polymer Chemistry II. Fundamentals of chemical, physical, and molecular aspects of polymers in bulk and solutions. No laboratory is required. Prerequisites: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 689. Special Topics in Polymer Chemistry. Detailed consideration of areas of special interests in polymer chemistry. Prerequisite: CH 580, 581.

CH 690. Introduction to Graduate Research. The purpose of this course is to acquaint incoming graduate students with departmental, school and university policies and procedures for conducting research and teaching undergraduate students.   Pass/Fail. 1 hour.

CH 691. Seminar. Seminars on current topics in chemical research. Pass/Fail. 1 hour.

CH 692. Seminar Presentation. Oral departmental seminar given by graduate students on current topic in chemical research. 2 hours. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate research mentor and graduate committee.

CH 698. Graduate Research. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate research mentor. Pass/Fail. 1-12 hours.

CH 699. M.S. Thesis Research. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy and permission of graduate research mentor. 1-12 hours.

CH 700. Foundations of Physical and Analytical Chemistry. Molecular thermodynamics, molecular reaction dynamics, and chemical equilibria. Ligand binding to macromolecules in aqueous solution.

CH 701. Foundations of Organic and Inorganic Chemistry. Organic – Bonding and structure, concerted pericyclic reactions, stereochemistry, effects of conformation, sterics and electronics on reactivity; and the study of reaction mechanisms with emphasis on nucleophilic substitution. Inorganic – Bonding and structure including basic molecular orbital theory, the solid state, Lewis acid-base chemistry, coordination chemistry, reaction mechanisms for transition metal complexes and characterization of transition metal complexes.

CH 702. Principles of Chemical Instruction. Responsibilities of laboratory instructors, safety regulations, grading, teaching styles and formats, and instructional objectives. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1 hour.

CH 710. Laboratory Experiences in Chemistry I. Course of development, preparation, execution and evaluation of chemical experiments appropriate for high school science programs. Held in collaboration with summer chemistry camps on campus.

CH 711. Laboratory Experiences in Chemistry II. Continuation of CH 610.

CH 712. Polymer Chemistry for Teachers. Lecture and laboratory experiences focusing on natural and synthetic polymers. Morning lectures by polymer chemists with afternoon labs where polymers are synthesized and studied. Emphasis is on practical application and new developments in polymer chemistry. Experiments are suitable for high school science programs.

CH 713. Introductory Organic Chemistry for Teachers. A laboratory, lecture, demonstration course on the nature of carbon compounds including hydrocarbons, functional groups and their reactions. Emphasis given to laboratory experiments and demonstrations suitable for high school students.

CH 714. Introductory Biochemistry for Teachers. Course covering structure, characteristics, biological function, and reactions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Models of implementation of these topics in the classroom are also presented and discussed

CH 715. Introductory Biochemistry for Teachers II. Lecture series covering vitamins, minerals, enzymes, biochemical energy and metabolism. Strong connections between chemistry and biology. Practical applications are emphasized.

CH 716. Chemical Demonstrations. A laboratory-based course exploring the teaching potential of selected chemical reactions. Teachers perform at least 50 demonstrations in the laboratory and share ways they can use these in their own classes. Emphasis on facilitating learning of chemistry.

CH 717. Green Chemistry for High School Teachers. This course introduces green chemistry concepts and demonstrates laboratory experiments appropriate for the high school classroom.  This is a blended course that requires participation in on-line instruction and on-campus laboratory experiences.

CH 719. Special Topics in Chemical Education. Topics determined by interest of students and faculty.

CH 725. Molecular Structure and Spectroscopy. Classical and quantum mechanical descriptions of molecular structure and bonding. Basic principles and techniques of molecular spectroscopic methods. Exercises and experiments with computational software and spectroscopic instrumentation will be conducted.

CH 729. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. Topics determined by mutual student-faculty interest. Typical are computational chemistry, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance. Prerequisite: CH 600/700 or permission of Instructor. 1 – 3 hours.

CH 730. Physical Organic Chemistry. Localized and delocalized chemical bonds, stereochemistry, acidity and basicity, determining organic mechanisms and structure.

CH 731. Organic Reactions and Their Mechanisms. Detailed mechanisms for a variety of synthetically useful reactions including nucleophilic and electrophilic substitution, free radical substitutions, additions to carbon-carbon and carbon-hetero multiple bonds, and elimination reactions. Prerequisite: CH 701.

CH 732. Organic Reactions and Synthesis. Reactions and strategies for efficient organic synthesis, including carbon skeletal assembly, selective functional group interconversion, protecting groups, stereochemical control. Prerequisite: CH701.

CH 733. Reactive Intermediates and Conservation of Bonding. Behavior of organic molecules in static and reactive situations. Prerequisite: CH 731 or permission of instructor.

CH 739. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry. Topics determined by interest of students and faculty. Prerequisite: CH 732. 1-3 hours.

CH 742. Organometallic Chemistry and Catalysis. Study of transition metal organometallic compounds and their applications as homogeneous catalysts for organic and polymer syntheses. Prerequisite: CH 640 or 740 or permission of instructor.

CH 749. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Topics determined by interest of students and faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-3 hours.

CH 751. Chemometrics. Introduction to basic data analysis techniques that include testing hypotheses, establishing tendencies and correlations, experimental design, etc. The course is designed to provide a support to a research chemist in effectively solving everyday problems associated with production and interpretation of experimental data. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CH 759. Thermal processes and methods. Introduction to thermally initiated physical and chemical processes in the condensed phase systems such as liquids, crystalline solids, and glasses (amorphous solids). The course covers the use of calorimetry, thermogravimetry, and thermomechanical methods for exploring thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallization, glass transition, solid-solid and helix-coil transitions, decomposition, polymerization. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CH 760. Fundamentals of Biochemistry. Overview of biochemical principles; chemistry of aqueous solutions, biochemical building blocks including amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleotides; structure and function of proteins, membranes, and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics. Catabolic and anabolic metabolism of biomolecules, regulation of metabolic processes. Application of clinical correlations of metabolism to human nutrition and disease. Prerequisite: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 761. Advanced Biochemistry I. Anin-depth examination of the biochemical, biophysical, and enzymology of processes including molecular genetics (DNA replication, transcription, and protein synthesis), bioenergetics, and protein structure, folding, and energetics. Prerequisite: 660.

CH 762. Advanced Biochemistry II. Continuation of biochemistry including molecular genetics (replication, transcription, and translation), metabolic pathways, control of gene expression. Prerequisite: 661.

CH 763. Biochemistry Laboratory. Introduction to modern bioanalytical techniques used for the expression, isolation and characterization of proteins and other biological macromolecules. Prerequisites: CH 660 and permission of instructor.

CH 764. Biophysical Chemistry. Physical/analytical approaches (including mass spectroscopy and NMR) toward determination of macromolecular structures, ligand binding, and enzymology. Prerequisites: CH 660 and permission of instructor.

CH 769. Special Topics in Biochemistry. Detailed consideration of areas of special interest. Prerequisites: CH 760 and permission of instructor. 1-3 hours.

CH 771. Medicinal Chemistry & Drug Discovery. An advanced organic course with emphasis on design strategies for discovering small organic molecule drugs using common macromolecular drug targets. Examples of successful design for clinically used drug classes will be presented. Prerequisites include undergraduate organic chemistry and undergraduate biochemistry.

CH 772. Chemistry of Natural Products. A one-semester advanced organic chemistry course that provides an introduction to the broad field of the major classes of natural products chemistry and includes insights on isolation, structure, properties, synthesis, biological targets, and importance in medical applications. Prerequisites: include undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 773. Electron Pushing and Total synthesis. An advanced organic course aimed to enhance students’ comprehension of advanced organic chemistry theory and principles, and apply them to understand reaction mechanisms and tactic of total synthesis. It will cover different types of common organic reactions each week, for example, reactions involving anion intermediates, cation intermediates, rearrangement, photochemical process, carbonyl compounds, and other reactive intermediates. Using electron pushing for mechanistic reasoning will be emphasized. Prerequisites: include undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 774. XRay Crystallography. Fundamental principles of X-ray crystallography. Students gain enough information to be able to collect meaningful data and analyze and refine structures. Students learn how to collect, process and and analyze x-ray data, focus on heavy atom phasing techniques and use state of the art software for refinement. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CH 780. Polymer Chemistry I. Basic chemical principles of polymers with the focus on synthesis, characterization, and applications of synthetic and biological macromolecules. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor and concurrent enrollment in CH 580L.

CH 780L. Polymer Chemistry I Laboratory. Laboratory to accompany CH 680 (Polymer Chemistry I). Concurrent enrollment in CH 680.

CH 781. Polymer Chemistry II. Fundamentals of chemical, physical, and molecular aspects of polymers in bulk and solutions. Prerequisites: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor and concurrent enrollment in CH 680L.

CH 781L. Polymer Chemistry II Laboratory. Laboratory to accompany CH 681 (Polymer Chemistry II). Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in CH 681.

CH 783. Polymer Chemistry I. Basic chemical principles of polymers with the focus on synthesis, characterization, and applications of synthetic and biological macromolecules. No laboratory is required. Prerequisites: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 784. Polymer Chemistry II. Fundamentals of chemical, physical, and molecular aspects of polymers in bulk and solutions. No laboratory is required. Prerequisites: undergraduate organic chemistry and permission of instructor.

CH 789. Special Topics in Polymer Chemistry. Detailed consideration of areas of special interests in polymer chemistry. Prerequisite: CH 580, 581.

CH 790. Introduction to Graduate Research. The purpose of this course is to acquaint incoming graduate students with departmental, school and university policies and procedures for conducting research and teaching undergraduate students. Pass/Fail. 1 hour.

CH 791. Seminar. Seminars on current topics in chemical research. Pass/Fail. 1 hour.

CH 792. Seminar Presentation. Oral departmental seminar given by graduate students on current topics in chemical research. 2 hours. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate research mentor and graduate committee.

CH 798. Nondissertation Research. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate research mentor. Pass/Fail. 1-12 hours.

CH 799. Dissertation Research. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy and permission of graduate research mentor. 1-12 hours.