Haddin Arts & Sciences Forum

The Theodore Haddin Arts and Sciences Forum is an ongoing lecture series at UAB's College of Arts and Sciences. It is a venue for Arts and Sciences faculty to talk about their research with their colleagues, students, and members of the public, and is designed to celebrate faculty work and to launch new conversations.

Each academic year, the Forum presents a series of five to six informal lectures from a cross-section of departments in the university. The main criterion for inclusion is that the topics presented be of interest to a broad range of faculty members, students, and the public. Meetings of the Haddin Forum are free and open to the public. All forums will take place in Heritage Hall, room 126. Lunch is provided.


September Haddin Forum

Friday, September 28
11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
HHB 126
Lunch will be provided

Tina Kempin Reuter.

Human Rights and the City: Shaping Urban Spaces for Access, Inclusion, and Empowerment for All

Tina Kempin Reuter, Director of Institute for Human Rights

Over half of the world’s population lives in cities today – a number that is expected to drastically rise in the coming years. Organizing this dynamic human space, enabling people from diverse backgrounds to live together, addressing the spatial and social challenges of urban life, and delivering services to the inhabitants are enormous tasks cities face today. As cities continue to expand, so does their impact as actors at the regional, national, and international levels. Cities have become centers for human development, social justice, and policy innovation. They serve as key actors shaping, implementing, and monitoring policies dealing with human rights and social justice.

The idea that the city belongs to all individuals inhabiting the urban space is grounded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the New Urban Agenda, and it is referred to as “right to the city” or “rights in the city.” This presentation seeks answers to two interrelated questions: First, how do we produce spaces that reflect fundamental human rights values such as non-discrimination, equality, and access for all? And second, how can we ensure that all city inhabitants take part and are represented in the modern urban discourse? By looking at the situation of persons with disabilities, one of the most marginalized groups in cities, we will discuss the questions of how to build inclusive, fair, and accessible cities and how to eliminate inequalities seen in urban communities. Because technology is often cited as one way to foster integration of marginalized communities, special attention will be given to the smart city and the opportunities and challenges presented by information and communication technologies (ICTs) for human rights, accessibility, and inclusion.


2018-2019 Schedule

Friday, September 28
11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Tina Kempin Reuter, Director of Institute for Human Rights
Associate Professor in Department of Political Science and Public Administration and Department of Anthropology
Human Rights and the City: Shaping Urban Spaces for Access, Inclusion, and Empowerment for All

Friday, October 26
11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 
Noa Turel, Assistant Professor, Department of Art and Art History
Engines of Wonder: Painting and Engineering in Renaissance Europe

Friday, November 30
11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 
Matt King, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy
Pots & Kettles: The Ethics of Hypocrisy

Friday, January 25
11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Andrew Keitt, Associate Professor, Department of History
Medical Martyrs: A Nineteenth-Century Representation of Inquisitorial Persecution of Early Modern Spanish Physicians

Friday, February 22
11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 
Jill Clements, Assistant Professor, Department of English
Bodies of Stone: Crosses and Runes in Early English Memorial Inscriptions

Friday, March 29
11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 
Kimberly Schnormeier, Associate Professor, Department of Theatre
Clothes Tell Stories: Using Object Based Research to Unravel Personal Narratives in Dress

UAB is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer committed to fostering a diverse, equitable and family-friendly environment in which all faculty and staff can excel and achieve work/life balance irrespective of race, national origin, age, genetic or family medical history, gender, faith, gender identity and expression as well as sexual orientation. UAB also encourages applications from individuals with disabilities and veterans.