Erika Hille Rinker. Assistant Professor of German
Humanities Building 405
(205) 975-5352

Research and Teaching Interests: Twentieth-century German and Austrian Literature and Culture, Literature and Medicine, Translation Theory and Practice, Travel Writing, Women’s Writing

Office Hours: By appointment

  • BA, Wake Forest University, German
  • MA, Washington University in St. Louis, Germanic Languages and Literatures
  • PhD, Washington University in St. Louis, Germanic Languages and Literatures

Erika Hille Rinker is responsible for all sections of German offered at UAB and advises all German minors. Both in the language classroom and in her role as the facilitator of Stammtisch, Rinker looks for opportunities to share her interests in her discipline, especially the intersections of German and Austrian literature, film, and popular medical discourses on physical, mental, and figurative confinements. Where she can, she brings in examples from her interdisciplinary dissertation, which explored instances of stutter and silence in fin-de-siècle, critical modernist literature in texts by Oskar Kokoschka, Karl Kraus, Georg Trakl, and Ludwig Wittgenstein.

In an effort to expand opportunities for UAB German students to study abroad, Rinker maintains a relationship with Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen that grew out of her participation in the 2010 Baden-Württemberg Seminar for American Faculty in German and German Studies. As a result, intermediate German students from UAB may affordably complete their minor in German through the Spring Intensive Program at Universität Tübingen.

In addition to growing the German program, Rinker regularly offers English-language courses required by the Foreign Language Major Common Core, including a service-learning option for the FLL 120: Foreign Cultures course. This effort has been supported through Rinker’s training as a UAB Faculty Fellow in Engaged Scholarship and an ongoing partnership with UAB’s English Language Institute. Rinker encourages students to engage in first-person, cross-cultural dialogues related directly to course objectives and expected learning outcomes in order to develop a better understanding of the constructed nature of cultures and a greater awareness of how one’s culture is perceived by others.

  • FLL 120: SL Foreign Cultures (Service Learning)
  • FLL 485: Foreign Language Capstone Seminar (Gender and War in Twentieth-Century Texts)
  • German 101: Introductory German I
  • German 102: Introductory German II
  • German 201: Intermediate German I
  • German 202: Intermediate German II
  • German 203: German Culture and Civilization
  • Goethe-Institut/American Association of Teachers of German Certificate of Merit, 2015
  • UAB Faculty Fellow in Engaged Scholarship, 2014-2015
  • Selected Participant — Integrating Language, Culture, and Content Learning Across the Undergraduate German Curriculum Seminar. Thirty-ninth Annual Conference of the German Studies Association, Washington DC, October 1-4, 2015
  • Selected Participant — Art, War, and Trauma Seminar. Thirty-eighth Annual Conference of the German Studies Association, Kansas City, Missouri, September 18-21, 2014
  • Selected Participant — Baden-Württemberg Seminar for American Faculty in German and German Studies. Organized by Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen. Sponsored by Baden-Württemberg Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts and the German-American Fulbright Commission. Tübingen, Konstanz, Freiburg, and Heidelberg, June 22 to July 3, 2010
  • American Association of Teachers of German
  • American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages
  • German Studies Association
  • Advisor – German Minors; GN 299 and 399 Special Readings in German
  • Stammtisch Facilitator (German Language Conversation Table)
  • Faculty Mentor – GHS320 Global Health Service Learning (Project Hearts, Spring 2015; Co-led student group to Baitoa, Dominican Republic, March 2015)