Course Offerings for Fall 2014

PHL 100 1B - Introduction to Philosophy (crn 52378), Professor Benditt,
MWF  9:05 am – 9:55 am

Survey of select philosophic problems and themes, typically including God, knowledge, mind, freedom, and moral value; contemporary and/or historical reading may be used.


PHL 100 1C - Introduction to Philosophy (crn 52365), Professor Benditt, 
MWF 10:10 am – 11:00 am

Survey of select philosophic problems and themes, typically including God, knowledge, mind, freedom, and moral value; contemporary and/or historical reading may be used.


PHL 100 1E - Introduction to Philosophy (crn 56820), Professor Abrams, 
MWF 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm
Survey of select philosophic problems and themes, typically including God, knowledge, mind, freedom, and moral value; contemporary and/or historical reading may be used.


PHL 100 2D - Introduction to Philosophy (crn 52364), Professor McCain,
TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm
Survey of select philosophic problems and themes, typically including God, knowledge, mind, freedom, and moral value; contemporary and/or historical reading may be used.


PHL 115 2D - Contemporary Moral Issues (crn 56826), Professor Price,
TR
12:30 pm – 1:45 pm  
Survey of contemporary moral problems and dilemmas; introduction to methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Topics may include abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, economic justice, homosexuality, animal rights, and respect for nature.


PHL 115 2F - Contemporary Moral Issues (crn 52391), Professor Price, 
TR
3:30 pm – 4:45 pm  
Survey of contemporary moral problems and dilemmas; introduction to methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Topics   may include abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, economic justice, homosexuality, animal rights, and respect for nature.


PHL 115 VT - Contemporary Moral Issues (crn 57265), Professor Pence, Friday 3:00 pm – 5:15 pm  
Survey of contemporary moral problems and dilemmas; introduction to methods and   concepts of moral philosophy. Topics   may include abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, economic justice, homosexuality, animal rights, and respect for nature.


PHL 116 1B - Bioethics (crn 56822), Professor Morrow, 
MWF 9:05 am – 9:55 am  
This course is an introduction to ethical issues in health care. We will discuss several of the issues you are most likely to encounter as a patient, as a patient’s family member, as a future doctor or nurse, or as a voter. Some of the questions we may cover include: Should doctors always tell patients the whole truth about their condition? Should physicians help severely ill patients end their lives? Is it wrong to choose to have a child, knowing it is likely to have a serious genetic illness? How should limited health care resources such as organs for transplant be allocated?


PHL 116 1D - Bioethics (crn 52374), Professor King,
MWF 11:15 am – 12:05 pm
This course is an introduction to ethical issues in health care. We will discuss several of the issues you are most likely to encounter as a patient, as a patient’s family member, as a future doctor or nurse, or as a voter. Some of the questions we may cover include: Should doctors always tell patients the whole truth about their condition? Should physicians help severely ill patients end their lives? Is it wrong to choose to have a child, knowing it is likely to have a serious genetic illness? How should limited health care resources such as organs for transplant be allocated?


PHL 116 1M - Bioethics (crn 56824), Professor King,  
MWF
3:35 pm – 4:25 pm  
This course is an introduction to ethical issues in health care. We will discuss several of the issues you are most likely to encounter as a patient, as a patient’s family member, as a future doctor or nurse, or as a voter. Some of the questions we may cover include: Should doctors always tell patients the whole truth about their condition? Should physicians help severely ill patients end their lives? Is it wrong to choose to have a   child, knowing it is likely to have a serious genetic illness? How should limited health care resources such as organs for transplant be allocated?


PHL 116 2B - Bioethics (crn 52627), Professor Whall,
TR
 9:30 am – 10:45 am
This course is an introduction to ethical issues in health care. We will discuss several of the issues you are most likely to encounter as a patient, as a patient’s family member, as a future doctor or nurse, or as a voter. Some of the questions we may cover include: Should doctors always tell patients the whole truth about their condition? Should physicians help severely ill patients end their lives? Is it wrong to choose to have a child, knowing it is likely to have a serious genetic illness? How should limited health care resources such as organs for transplant be allocated?


PHL 116 2C - Bioethics (crn 54231), Professor May
TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Moral problems and dilemmas in medicine and health affairs, as well as elementary methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Topics may include: abortion, euthanasia, assisted reproduction, AIDS, human cloning, human and animal experimentation, psychiatric treatment, medical financing, and neuroethics (e.g. brain enhancement, mind-reading technologies, moral and legal responsibility).


PHL 116 2E - Bioethics (crn 56827), Professor Whall, 
TR
2:00 pm – 3:15
This course is an introduction to ethical issues in health care. We will discuss several of the issues you are most likely to encounter as a patient, as a patient’s family member, as a future doctor or nurse, or as a voter. Some of the questions we may cover include: Should doctors always tell patients the whole truth about their condition? Should physicians help severely ill patients end their lives? Is it wrong to choose to have a child, knowing it is likely to have a serious genetic illness? How should limited health care resources such as organs for transplant be allocated?


PHL 120 - 1C Practical Reasoning (crn 56821), Professor Morrow, 
MWF
10:10 am – 11:00 am
This course is about the art of reasoning. Through reading, lecture, discussion, and practice, students in this course will learn to analyze, evaluate, and carry out various kinds of reasoning, including elementary formal logic and basic scientific reasoning. Students will also learn to communicate the results of their analyses, evaluations, and reasoning to others, both orally and in writing. The ultimate goal of the course is to empower students to better apply their reasoning skills to their academic, professional, civic, and personal lives.


PHL 135 2B - The Rule of Law (crn 52394), Professor Benditt,
TR
9:30 am – 10:45 am  
Law, legal institutions, and legal processes, with emphasis on civil law. Development of legal ideas in civil procedure, torts, contracts, property, and criminal law. Role and history of legal institutions within political framework.   Relations between courts and legislatures.


PHL 220 2C - Intro to Symbolic Logic (crn 56825), Professor Price, 
TR
11:00 am – 12:15 pm

The main objective of this course is to teach students methods of telling whether deductive arguments are valid. The course covers sentential logic and some predicate logic. Students who intend to do graduate work in philosophy should take this course. It would also benefit students who are specializing in computer science, cognitive science, or linguistics.


PHL 230 1E - Social and Political Philosophy (crn 56833), Professor Morrow, 
MWF
12:20 pm – 1:10 pm An interdisciplinary introduction to social and political philosophy. Social and political philosophers seek to understand how people ought to live together in society and how political power ought to be used. Because political power is most directly exercised through government policies, this course is structured around various policy goals: fairness, efficiency, well-being, liberty, and security. During the course, students will learn to understand, explain, and apply various philosophical theories about how governments and societies ought to balance those goals. We    will survey theories such as egalitarianism, utilitarianism, Rawlsian liberalism, libertarianism, and more; and  we will discuss topics such as property rights, market regulation, education, poverty, women’s rights, the environment, and more. This course counts toward the minor in Philosophy and Law and toward the Philosophy, Politics & Economics (PPE) concentration. For political science majors, the course counts toward the specialization in American Government and Political Theory.


PHL 270 1G - The Scientific Enterprise (crn 56823), Professor Abrams,
MWF
 2:30 pm – 3:20 pm  
Science plays a role in every aspect of our lives—when we drive, use the Internet, or drink safe water, for example. We don’t always stop and think about the nature of science, though. Have scientific worldviews changed over time? Does science reveal a hidden reality, or does it just give us ways to manipulate things we can see and touch? Does it give us the truth, or is it merely a game played for social status?


PHL 290/490 1F - Topics in Philosophy: Freewill & Responsibility (crn 56829/56830), Professor King,
MWF
1:25 pm – 2:15 pm  
This course explores the traditional problem for free will. Suppose the world is such that every event is completely determined by past facts and the laws of the universe. This as how science tells us the world (mostly) is. We can then ask: Are we morally responsible for what we do in such a world? Is it fair to blame and praise people for what they do? Does anyone deserve punishment for transgressions or rewards for accomplishments? In this course we’ll examine and critically assess various theories that try to answer these and other related questions.
 
PHL 315 2E Ethics: Good & Evil (crn 56828), Professor May,
TR
2:00 pm – 3:15 pm  
This course covers some central debates in ethical theory, which ultimately seeks a general explanation of what makes something morally right or wrong. A major focus is on opponents and proponents of consequentialist theories, such as utilitarianism, which judge the morality of an act solely in terms of its consequences (think: “the ends justify the means”). Alternative theories insist on including other elements as well, such as the nature of the act itself, human rights, rationality, and the character of the actor. Another key theme of the course is metaethics, which tries to answer questions such as: Are there moral facts? If so, are they in some sense objective? Is moral judgment grounded primarily in reasoning or in emotion? What motivates us to do what we believe is right? Prerequisite: One previous PHL course or permission of instructor.


PHL 322 2B - Philosophy Issues in Behavior Economics (crn 57275), Professor Robinson,
Tuesday – Thursday
9:30 am – 10:45 pm
This class is an introduction to behavioral economics: the attempt to incorporate insights from psychology into economics. In this course, we will study how behavioral economists try to explain a range of psychological and social phenomena, and how those explanations  differ from standard economic ones. Likely topics include drug use, sex, crime, gambling, over-eating, overconfidence and procrastination. In particular, we will study various ways in which (apparent) irrationality influences people's judgment and decision making. Behavioral economics is invaluable to anyone with an interest in human behavior. It is particularly relevant to those with an interest in economics, management, marketing, industrial organization, public policy, and the psychology of   judgment and decision making. Pre-requisite: EC210, or permission of instructor.


PHL 390/490 2C - Topics in Philosophy Kant (crn 56831/56832), Professor Whall,
TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm
This is a careful look at Kant’s epistemology and ethics using a combination of primary   and secondary sources. We will also consider Kant’s enormous influence on later generations of philosophers.


PHL 405 9H - Epistemology (crn 56834), Professor McCain,
Tuesday
5:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Human knowledge; its nature, sources, and limits. Concepts of truth, objectivity, justification, evidence, and belief.