""Spring 2018 Courses

Note: Some course names on BlazerNET will show Topics in Philosophy or Philosophy Seminar. CRN = Course Reference Number.


100-Level Courses

PHL 100: Intro to Philosophy

Introductory survey of philosophy, its nature, methods, and problems. Topics typically include, among others, existence of God, freedom, knowledge, right and wrong. Classical and/or contemporary readings. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.
Time Offered/Teacher:

PHL 115: Contemporary Moral Issues

Survey of contemporary moral problems and dilemmas; introduction to methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Topics may include abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, economic justice, homosexuality, animal rights, and respect for nature. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.
Time Offered/Teacher:

PHL 116: Bioethics

Moral problems and dilemmas in medicine and health professions; elementary methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Problems typically include, among others, AIDS and human and animal experimentation. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.
Time Offered/Teacher:

PHL 120: Practical Reasoning

Survey of skills in critical thinking and scientific reasoning, including the ability to identify different kinds of arguments, recognize common fallacies of reasoning, and evaluate analogical, causal, and statistical arguments. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.
Time Offered/Teacher:

200-Level Courses

PHL 203: Philosophy of Religion

Religion; its nature, justification, and significance. God, evil, religious experience, faith, and reason. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.
Time Offered/Teacher: TR 2:00 - 3:15 p.m., Travis Coblentz (CRN 39920)

PHL 230: Social/Political Philosophy

Survey of contemporary debates concerning fundamental principles of political life. Topics typically include justification of political authority, the proper role of government in society, economic justice, freedom and rights, and the free enterprise system. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.
Time Offered/Teacher: TR 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m., Brynn Welch (CRN 41385)

PHL 290: EMSAP Intensive Bioethics

In-depth study of moral problems and dilemmas in medicine and health professions; elementary methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Problems typically include, among others, AIDS and human and animal experimentation. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.
Time Offered/Teacher: MWF 9:05 - 9:55 a.m., Gregory E. Pence (CRN 41386)

PHL 292: Searching for Understanding

This course will explore the nature of understanding. In particular we will consider questions such as 'what is understanding?', 'what does it take to understand?', 'is understanding different from knowledge?', 'can you understand without having an explanation?', among others.
Time Offered/Teacher: MWF 11:15 a.m. - 12:05 p.m., Kevin McCain (CRN 41388)

300-Level Courses

PHL 312: Philosophy of Biology

This course surveys issues in contemporary philosophy of biology and some closely related issues. Much of the focus will be on philosophical issues concerning evolutionary biology, but issues in developmental biology, molecular biology, and immunology will also be considered. No background in biology is required. Philosophical issues involving evolution and ethics, nature vs. nurture, evolution and psychology, biological mechanisms and models, species and human nature, evolution and intelligent design, and natural selection and chance will be discussed.
Time Offered/Teacher: M 5:00 - 7:30 p.m., Marshall Abrams (CRN 41390)

PHL 335: Philosophy of Law

Theories of the nature of law (natural law, realism, positivism, critical legal theory); interpretation of precedents, statutes, and Constitution; Constitutional protections such as freedom of speech and religion and the right of privacy; selected issues in criminal and civil law. Ethics and Civic responsibility are significant components of this course.
Time Offered/Teacher: MWF 12:20 - 1:10 p.m., Matthew King (CRN 31295)

PHL 342: History of Philosophy: Kant-19th Century

Kant once said that there were two things which filled his mind with awe — the starry skies above and the moral law within. In keeping with this sentiment, we are going to examine the central teachings of Emanuel Kant, focusing on his metaphysics, epistemology, and Ethics. Other philosophers to be covered include Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche.
Time Offered/Teacher: TR 3:30 - 4:45 p.m. Mary B. Whall (CRN 41392).

400-Level Courses

PHL 402: Neuroethics Capstone

Ethical issues related to neuroscience and other sciences of the mind. Topics typically include: privacy and side effects of brain technologies; neuroscientific threats to free will; moral responsibility and mental illness; emotion and reason in moral judgment; cognitive enhancement and personality change; ethically sound research practices. A previous course in Philosophy is recommended. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.
Time Offered/Teacher: W 5:00 - 7:30 p.m., Joshua May (CRN 39966)

PHL 408: Metaphysics Capstone

Does your possible identical twin exist? If a clay statue is on the table and nothing else is on the table, are there three things on the table--the statue, the lump of clay of which it is made, and the clay in the statue? Are past, present, and future real? Is space a big container? Are numbers real things that do not exist in space or time? Is there any moment at which all of you exists? PHL 408-1C considers these questions and others.
Prerequisite: two previous philosophy courses.
Time Offered/Teacher: MWF 10:10 - 11:00 a.m., Marjorie S. Price (CRN 37846)

PHL 442: History of Philosophy: Kant and 19th Century

Kant once said that there were two things which filled his mind with awe — the starry skies above and the moral law within. In keeping with this sentiment, we are going to examine the central teachings of Emanuel Kant, focusing on his metaphysics, epistemology, and Ethics. Other philosophers to be covered include Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche.
Time Offered/Teacher: TR 3:30 - 4:45 p.m., Mary B. Whall (CRN 41393)

PHL 490: EMSAP Intensive Bioethics

In-depth study of moral problems and dilemmas in medicine and health professions; elementary methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Problems typically include, among others, AIDS and human and animal experimentation. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.
Time Offered/Teacher: MWF 9:05 - 9:55 a.m., Gregory E. Pence (CRN 41387)

PHL 491: Searching for Understanding Capstone

This course will explore the nature of understanding. In particular we will consider questions such as 'what is understanding?', 'what does it take to understand?', 'is understanding different from knowledge?', 'can you understand without having an explanation?', among others.
Time Offered/Teacher: MWF 11:15 a.m. - 12:05 p.m., Kevin McCain (CRN 41389)

PHL 492: Philosophy of Biology Capstone

This course surveys issues in contemporary philosophy of biology and some closely related issues. Much of the focus will be on philosophical issues concerning evolutionary biology, but issues in developmental biology, molecular biology, and immunology will also be considered. No background in biology is required. Philosophical issues involving evolution and ethics, nature vs. nurture, evolution and psychology, biological mechanisms and models, species and human nature, evolution and intelligent design, and natural selection and chance will be discussed.
Time Offered/Teacher: M 5:00 - 7:30 p.m. Marshall Abrams (CRN 41391)

PHL 498: Philosophy Internship

On-campus and off-campus training positions in fields utilizing critical language and writing skills, with some positions offering external funding. Students should contact the Department Chair to discuss available positions and application procedures. Student must be a Philosophy major or minor.
Time Offered/Teacher: Gregory E Pence (CRN 41394)

PHL 499: Directed Studies - RES

Special arrangement opportunity for in-depth study. Permission of Instructor Only.
Time Offered/Teacher: Joshua May (CRN 42019)

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