Dr. Laura Stoppelbein

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Associate Professor

Other information

Other information:
Laura StoppelbeinContact Information:

Email: stoppel@uab.edu
Office Phone: (205) 934 5365 
Fax: (205) 975 6110

Education:

B.A., 1997, University of Alabama, Psychology
M.A., 1999, University of Alabama, Clinical Child Psychology
Ph.D., 2003, University of Alabama, Clinical Child Psychology

Curriculum Vitae

Research Program:

Dr. Stoppelbein is a clinical child psychologist with a primary interest in stress and coping among children, adolescents and families. Her approach to research is from a developmental psychopathology perspective. To this end her research includes investigations in topics such as predicting post-traumatic stress symptoms in pediatric populations, examining the moderating effects of psychosocial factors in childhood externalizing and internalizing disorders, and understanding the role of stress and anxiety among children diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorders and their families. A central theme in her research is the role of stress, cognitive appraisals, and coping strategies in the manifestation of internalizing and externalizing symptoms.

Representative Publications:

Luebbe, A. M., Elledge, L. C., Kiel, E. J., Stoppelbein, L. (in press). Cortisol predicts dysregulated behavior and length of stay among children admitted for acute psychiatric inpatient treatment. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.

Stoppelbein, L., Greening, L., & Fite, P. (2010). The role of cortisol in posttraumatic stress symptoms among mothers of children diagnosed with cancer. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 35, 960-965. doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsp139

Greening, L., Stoppelbein, L., Luebbe, A., & Fite, P. (2010). Aggression and the risk for suicidal behavior among children. Suicide and Life Threatening Behavior, 40, 337-345.

Fite, P., Stoppelbein, L., & Greening, L. (2009). Proactive and reactive aggression in a child psychiatric inpatient population: Relations to psychopathic characteristics. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 36, 481-493