Discounted Tickets

UAB School of Education alumni receive a special discount on game tickets to the Homecoming Football Game on October 11. To order discounted tickets to the Homecoming Football Game on October 11:
  1. Visit the
  2. Enter promotional access code: EDUCATION  
  3. Select number of tickets, and then "Add to Cart"

Event details


  •  Blazer Village and Tailgate: 12-2 pm Saturday, Oct 11
  •  Legion Field gates open at 1:30 pm
  •  UAB Blazers take the field to faceoff with the North Texas Eagles at 2:30 pm

School of Education Homecoming Events

Homecoming Events

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Monday, October 6th

Free hot dogs in the park from 11-1 pm or until we run out!

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Friday, October 10th

Come out with fellow Blazers and watch the Homecoming Parade. Parade begins at noon in front of the School of Education Building. 

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Saturday, October 11th

The School of Education is a proud sponsor of the UAB Blazers and their Homecoming faceoff with the North Texas Eagles. 

UAB School of Education alumni receive a special discount on game tickets to the Homecoming Football Game on October 11. To order discounted tickets:

  1. Visit the ticket portal
  2. Enter promotional access code: EDUCATION  
  3. Select number of tickets, and then "Add to Cart"
  • Blazer Village and Tailgate: 12-2 pm
  • Legion Field gates open at 1:30 pm
  • UAB Blazers take the field to faceoff with the North Texas Eagles at 2:30 pm
 

Creating a Learning Community

Creating a Learning Community

New Collaborative Partners SOE with Birmingham City Schools

cityschoolspartnershipUAB has long been committed to solving the unique educational challenges that exist in urban school systems. To that end, the UAB School of Education has joined with Birmingham City Schools to announce its Innovative Learning Collaborative—a partnership between faculty and students and Birmingham teachers, principals and the school system’s upper administration to form a learning community that improves education and benefits for students and all involved entities.

The participating schools are Glen Iris Elementary and EPIC Elementary. Both are located adjacent to UAB’s campus and, because of existing partnerships and proximity, are ideal for the initial collaboration, says Lynn Kirkland, Ed.D., chair of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

“I am hoping that we are able to create an atmosphere where excellence is the norm for students, teachers and the university,” says Michael Wilson, Ph.D., principal of Glen Iris.

“The collaboration between these entities is not new,” says Vicki Stokes, Ed.D., principal of EPIC. “We have worked together for many years. The difference is that there will be a more defined purpose and planning, such that the relationship and its benefits will last for years to come.”

The components include hands-on, in-classroom training for School of Education students, tools and resources for Birmingham schoolteachers and principals, collaborations among the groups to provide community education that include literacy efforts and partnerships to apply for funding for various initiatives such as innovative after-school programing. The partnership will also generate collaborative research that will provide instructional strategies that can be used in urban education.

Wilson and members of his staff, as well as Stokes and her administration, have been meeting regularly with UAB faculty to create a partnership they hope will make an impact.

“The collaboration between these entities is not new,” says Vicki Stokes, Ed.D., principal of EPIC. “We have worked together for many years. The difference is that there will be a more defined purpose and planning, such that the relationship and its benefits will last for years to come.”

“They are invested as much as we are,” says Deborah Voltz, Ed.D., dean of the School of Education. “We all have skin in the game.”

This past summer, the group acquired a memorandum of understanding signed by the Birmingham Board of Education. Craig Witherspoon, Ed.D., superintendent for Birmingham City Schools, says he hopes this initiative will become a district model.

“For the past few years, we’ve established and nurtured professional learning communities within our schools,” Witherspoon reports. “This partnership allows us to expand that concept and, not only broaden our base of knowledge and professional network, but also create additional opportunities for collaborative learning.”

Ultimately, the goal is to expand into the schools into which Glen Iris and EPIC feed, being there to assist students as they progress throughout their educational careers. “We are spending all the time we need to make this right,” Kirkland says. “Next is middle school, then high school. We want to help them feel as though we are with them every step of the way.”

Another expected outcome is highly trained teachers who have relationships with potential employers, as well as creating a UAB presence in the classrooms that could inspire students to consider attending UAB.

“When you think about recruitment, the students will have seen us all along,” Kirkland said. “Then they will want to come to UAB.”

Voltz is excited about that. “It does take a village to prepare a teacher and train a child,” she says. “We want to help to infuse new energy into the P-12 schools.”

Teacher of the Year

State of Education

UAB SOE Alumni Serve As Alabama’s Top Teachers

By Javacia Harris Bowser

Alabama Teacher of the Year is much more than a title on a plaque. It’s a reward that carries great responsibility for the winning educators, who become the voice of teachers across the state. Here, three UAB School of Education alumni who have received the prestigious honor describe their time as education advocates.

Changing the Conversation

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Since May 2013, when Alison Grizzle, Ed.D., became Alabama Teacher of the Year, she has met with students, fellow teachers, colleges, chambers of commerce, and school officials statewide, speaking at events focusing on everything from leadership to curriculum standards. It’s a demanding schedule for the math teacher at Birmingham’s Jackson-Olin High School, who earned her master’s in education at UAB in 1999. But it’s worth it if she can help change the national conversation about education, Grizzle says.

“There’s been a move over the last few years to paint teachers as part of the problem,” she says. “That’s not helping us recruit the youngest and brightest to the field. If we want our schools to remain competitive globally, we need the best in the classroom. We need people fighting to be teachers.”

Grizzle also would like to see measures of teacher performance that don’t simply rely on test scores. That would help avoid what Grizzle calls “painful” messages. Labeling a school as “failing” because it doesn’t reach particular benchmarks can discourage students and faculty when the school actually is improving, she notes. She also worries about the impact of such messages on the educational aspirations of students in poverty.

“I hear how American schools are failing, but we focus on educating all children,” Grizzle says. “Some countries we praise for education don’t provide it for everyone, so we’re comparing apples to oranges.

“All students can learn, but we don’t always create avenues so that all students can be successful,” she adds. One of her objectives as Teacher of the Year is to speak for disadvantaged students who are often underrepresented in conversations about education, she says.

Great teachers have both “passion and compassion,” Grizzle says. The passion must encompass both the content they teach and the learning process, she notes. “The kids will see the light in your eye and become excited just because of your excitement,” she says. “And you have to be compassionate because today’s youth go through so much. It’s not about letting students use their circumstances as an excuse, but giving them the scaffolding and support to rise above them.”

Champions for Learning

0114 TOY perry lgTonya Perry, Ph.D., won the 2000 Alabama Teacher of the Year Award when she taught eighth-grade English at Hoover’s Berry Middle School. That led to meeting President George W. Bush and seeing the White House Rose Garden, but Perry believes the most significant part of her year was the time she spent visiting Alabama schools, including the day she read to elementary students in rural Russell County. “You would have thought I was Princess Diana,” Perry says with a laugh, recalling her warm welcome. “That reception is a constant reminder of the importance of teachers in the lives of their students.”

"The people who don't do the job as well tend to get the most attention. Teaching should be talked about in the affirmative more often.”
—Tonya Perry

Perry also enjoyed meeting with Miles College students and professors. “It was enlightening to talk with people in teacher education and to get their feedback about teacher preparation,” she says. Today, Perry is in teacher education herself, serving as assistant professor of curriculum and instruction in UAB’s School of Education. Perry earned her master's in 1995 and her doctorate in 2007 in a joint program from UAB and the University of Alabama.

Perry believes there is a misconception about the overall quality of teachers in the education system. “The people who don’t do the job as well tend to get the most attention,” Perry says. “Teaching should be talked about in the affirmative more often.”

Perry is hopeful about the field’s future because of what she learned as Teacher of the Year. “Teachers do have a voice,” Perry says. “When we’re in our classrooms, we don’t always see how many people are championing us and our children.” 


Great Teachers, Great Results

Ann Dominick, Ed.D., who earned her master’s at UAB in 1987, won the 1999 Alabama Teacher of the Year Award while teaching at South Shades Crest Elementary School. She says she enjoyed visiting classrooms across the state to help students and fellow teachers with math education and follow their progress. As a result, she became a math coach for Hoover City Schools. Now, as an assistant professor of elementary and early childhood education at UAB, Dominick still considers herself a math coach. “The age of the learner is different, but the learning is the same,” she says. “And the way I teach is the same. I’m still trying to find out where students are and take them forward.”

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While traveling, Dominick also realized that the quality of education for students can vary drastically, even within a school. That’s something she would like to change about the education system, she says. “All kids should be able to have great teachers,” Dominick explains. “Great teachers know how to listen. They have a passion for people and for learning. They know how to find out where students are and help them advance to the next stage. They believe all students can learn.”

Dominick doesn’t believe in quick fixes for education problems, however. “There’s no one-size-fits-all solution that will take care of everything, whether it’s charter schools or anything else,” she says. She also disagrees with attempts to apply business models to education. “When teachers know content well, when they know how children learn, and when they have a passion for helping children learn, you get results,” she says.