Graduate Programs

Materials Engineering (Ph.D., M.S.Mt.E.)

This information is not official, and is offered strictly as a convenience. For official UAB Graduate Course Catalog information please visit the UAB Graduate School site.

Admission Requirements
Preparatory Courses
M.S.Mt.E. Program
Ph.D. Program
Course Descriptions

MSE Graduate Program
Additional Helpful Information

 

Degree Offered:

Ph.D., M.S.Mt.E.

Director:

Dr. Uday Vaidya

Phone:

(205) 934-9199

E-mail:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Web site:

www.eng.uab.edu

Faculty

J. Barry Andrews, Professor and Chair (Materials Science and Engineering); Polymer and Metal Matrix Composites, Solidification, Physical Metallurgy, Electronic Properties

Krishan K. Chawla, Professor Emeritus (Materials Science and Engineering); Metal, Ceramic, and Polymer Matrix Composite Materials; Fibers; Interfacial Phenomena; Foams and Microballoons

Derrick R. Dean, Associate Professor and Undergraduate Program Director (Materials Science and Engineering); Structure-Property relationships of polymers and multiphase polymer systems, including blends, nano- and micro-composites

Zoe E B Dwyer, Assistant Professor, Director of Outreach and Retention (Materials Science and Engineering)

Robin D. Foley, Associate Professor (Materials Science and Engineering); Materials Characterization, Physical Metallurgy, Metals Casting

Amber L. Genau, Assistant Professor (Materials Science and Engineering); Solidification and Reconstruction and Analysis of 3D images

John A. Griffin, Research Assistant Professor (Materials Science and Engineering); Metals Casting, Testing and Characterization, Nondestructive Evaluation

Gregg M. Janowski
, Professor (Materials Science and Engineering); X-Ray Diffraction; Composite Materials, Physical Metallurgy, Structure-Processing-Property Relationships

Charles A. Monroe, Assistant Professor (Materials Science and Engineering); Solidification, Metals Casting, Design for Manufacture, Simulation and Modeling

Haibin Ning, Research Assistant Professor (Materials Science and Engineering); Polymer Matrix Composite Materials, Metal; Design and Modeling, Manufacturing and Processing, Testing and Characterization

Selvum "Brian" Pillay, Associate Professor (Materials Science and Engineering); Polymer Matrix Composites, Multiscale, Multiphase Composite systems; Manufacturing and Processing, Design for Manufacture, Testing and Characterization

Rosalia N. Scripa, Professor (Materials Science and Engineering); Ceramics and Glass, Extractive Metallurgy, Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Electronic-Magnetic Materials

Vinoy Thomas, Research Assistant Professor (Materials Science and Engineering); Polymeric Biomaterials and 3D Scaffolds for tissue engineering, Nanomaterials and nanodiamonds for therapeutic applications, Nanocompostites / Green materials and their processing-structure-property relationships, Electrospinning and biodegradable polymer synthesis / characterizations, In vitro cells-Bio(nano)materials interactions

Uday Vaidya, Professor, Associate Chair and Graduate Program Director (Materials Science and Engineering); Composites Applications Development, Thermoset and Thermoplastic Polymer Matrix Composites, Design, Manufacturing & Process Modeling, Nondestructive Evaluation and Dynamic Response

Admission Requirements

In addition to the general Graduate School admission requirements, requirements for admission to the M.S.Mt.E. and Ph.D. graduate programs include the following criteria:

1. A 3.0 (A = 4.0) or better GPA on all undergraduate degree major courses attempted

2. MSE evaluates the three scores reported on the GRE revised General Test (as of August 2012):

  • a Verbal Reasoning score reported on a 130-170 score scale, in 1-point increments
  • a Quantitative Reasoning score reported on a 130-170 score scale, in 1-point increments
  • an Analytical Writing score reported on a 0-6 score scale, in half-point increments

3. MSE recommends that a student receive a minimum quantitative score of 148/170 (600/800 on the old scale); a verbal score of 153/180 (500/800 on the old scale) and a score of 3/6 on the analytical writing.TOEFL is an additional requirement for international students. The revised TOEFL scoring scale for an internet based TOEFL test (iBT) is 0-120 which includes:

  • Reading Section (Score of 0-30)
  • Listening Section (Score of 0-30)
  • Speaking Section (Score of 0-30)
  • Writing Section (Score of 0-30)

MSE requires a minimum TOEFL score of 80-120 (20 in each section) to be considered for admission and financial support. For applicants who report TOEFL scores based on a paper test or a computer test, the scores will be compared to the iBT scale

Preparatory Courses

A student seeking a graduate degree in Materials Engineering without a Baccalaureate degree in Materials Engineering or similarly named program accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org, must demonstrate competence at the undergraduate level in the areas of physical behavior of materials, thermodynamics, mechanical behavior of materials, instrumentation, and characterization. He/she may do this by passing all or some of the following courses depending on the student's academic background. Students may be exempted from individual courses if they demonstrate that they possess the knowledge from that course. However, the burden of proof is on the student. The decisions are based on a balance between assuring a sufficient background and imposing more extensive course demands. The preparatory courses must be taken on a pass/fail basis, with a "pass" being equivalent to a grade of B or better in the course. The courses that fulfill the preparatory requirements are:

MSE 280-Engineering Materials
MSE 281-Physical Materials I
MSE 380-Thermodynamics of Materials(Not required if graduate students takes MSE 603/703) 
MSE 381-Physical Materials II
MSE 382-Mechanical Behavior of Materials.
MSE 565-Characterization of Materials

M.S.Mt.E. Program

The following minimum requirements for a Master of Science in Materials Engineering apply to a student who has earned a baccalaureate degree from a program accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org, in materials or metallurgical engineering or in a similarly named engineering program. A student with an undergraduate degree in another field of engineering or in the physical sciences may also be accepted into the Materials Engineering program. However, such a student will be required to demonstrate competence in fields of study that emphasize the interrelationship among structure, processing, performance, and properties of materials. This can be accomplished by one of the methods described under "Preparatory Courses." All full-time master's students must take MSE 601-Materials Science and Engineering Seminar every term.

Plan I (Thesis Option)

The student must successfully complete at least 24 semester hours of (primarily) materials engineering graduate course work. 

  • Of these 24 hours, 3 to 6 semester hours will be approved courses in mathematics, physical sciences, another engineering discipline or management (a maximum of 3 hours are allowed in management).
  • Up to 9 of the 24 hours may be at the 500 level.
  • The student must successfully complete and defend a thesis.
  • The student must register for and successfully complete at least 9 semester hours of MSE 699-Master's Degree Thesis Research in addition to the 24 semester hours of course work.

Plan II (Nonthesis Option): Research/Design Emphasis

The student must successfully complete at least 30 semester hours of (primarily) materials engineering graduate course work.

  • Of these 30 hours, 3 to 6 semester hours will be approved courses in mathematics, physical sciences, another engineering discipline or management (a maximum of 3 hours are allowed in management).
  • Up to 9 of the 30 hours may be at the 500 level.
  • The student must complete 3 semester hours of MSE 699-Nonthesis Research, involving an on-site research project (usually taken after completion of all coursework)
  • Successfully complete a written comprehensive examination on all course work taken in the program or a comprehensive examination on the on-site research project topic. The latter option requires a publication-quality manuscript and oral presentation (with questions) deemed acceptable by the graduate committee.

Plan II (Nonthesis Option): Technology/Engineering Management Emphasis

The student must successfully complete at least 30 semester hours of graduate credit, including

  • 12 semester hours of course work in a specific area of materials science and engineering (at least 6 of these 12 hours must be at the 600 level);
  • 6 semester hours of approved management course work
  • 9 semester hours of engineering-oriented management coursework
  • 3 hours of MBA 631-Administrative Theory and Practice.

The student must also complete 3 semester hours of MSE 698-Nonthesis Research involving an on-site design or research project (usually undertaken after completion of all course work). Successfully complete a written comprehensive examination on all course work taken in the program or a comprehensive examination on the on-site research project topic. The latter option requires a publication-quality manuscript and oral presentation (with questions) deemed acceptable by the graduate committee.

Ph.D. Program

The Ph.D. program in Materials Engineering is offered jointly with the Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering at the University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa). All full-time doctoral students must take MSE 701-Materials Science and Engineering Seminar every term.

PhD Track (For students entering with a BS):

The following minimum requirements for a PhD in materials engineering apply to a student who has earned a baccalaureate degree from a program accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org/, in materials or metallurgical engineering or in a similarly named engineering program. A student with an undergraduate degree in another field of engineering or in the physical sciences may also be accepted into the Materials Engineering program. However, such a student will be required to demonstrate competence in fields of study that emphasize the interrelationship among structure, processing, performance, and properties of materials. This can be accomplished by one of the methods described under "Preparatory Courses

The requirements for a Ph.D. for a student entering with a BS degree are:

  • A minimum of 48 hours of approved graduate course work in metallurgical engineering, materials engineering, or fields supportive of these (15 hours may be at the 500 level and at least 6 semester hours but no more than 12 must be in supportive fields (a maximum of 6 hours can be in management)). Additional course work may be required at the discretion of the mentor and program director.
  • Successful completion of a written qualifying examination covering the preparatory course sequence. (Students will receive a Plan II Master’s upon successful completion of the Qualifying Exam and 30 hours of coursework.)
  • Successful completion of a Dissertation Research Proposal and examination on topics related to the student’s research. (Completion of this step is required for Admission to Candidacy.)
  • A minimum of 24 semester hours in MSE 799-Dissertation Research.
  • Successful defense of a research dissertation in metallurgical/materials engineering.

PhD Track (For students entering with a MS):

This track is for students entering the program with a master’s degree in Materials Engineering or a closely related field. The requirements are:

  • A minimum of 24 hours of approved graduate course work in metallurgical engineering, materials engineering, or fields supportive of these (6 hours may be at the 500 level and at least 3 semester hours but no more than 6 must be in supportive fields (a maximum of 3 hours can be in management)). Additional course work may be required at the discretion of the mentor and program director.
  • Successful completion of a written qualifying examination covering the preparatory course sequence.
  • Successful completion of a Dissertation Research Proposal and examination on topics related to the student’s research. (Completion of this step is required for Admission to Candidacy.)
  • A minimum of 24 semester hours in MSE 799-Dissertation Research.
  • Successful defense of a research dissertation in metallurgical/materials engineering.

 Additional Information

Deadline for Entry Term(s):

Each semester and summer

Deadline for All Application Materials to be in the Graduate School Office:

*Fall semester-March 1st
Spring semester-November 1st

Number of Evaluation Forms Required:

Three

Entrance Tests

GRE (TOEFL and TWE also required for international applicants whose native language is not English.)

Comments

*To be considered for funding

 

 

For detailed information, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , Graduate Program Director, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, BEC 254, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294-4461.

Course Descriptions

For doctoral courses at the University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa), see the graduate catalog of that university.
Unless otherwise noted, all courses are for 3 semester hours of credit.

Materials Science and Engineering (MSE)

501.Materials Processing. Processing of metals, glasses, ceramics, and composites. Powder processing, casting, welding, rapid solidification, and other advanced methods. 3 hours.

502.Frontiers of Materials. Recent advances in materials technology and application. Novel processing, structures, properties, and performance issues. 3 hours.

503.Degradation of Materials. Issues in long-term utilization of materials. Corrosion, high temperature oxidation, creep, fatigue, and their interactions. 3 hours.

505. Frontiers of Automotive Materials. Advanced lightweight automotive materials, manufacturing and modeling techniques. Technology advancements in cost-effective carbon, glass and related reinforcements; 'green' and sustainable materials, crashworthiness and injury protection of occupants and pedestrians, metal castings, heavy truck, mass transit, fuel cell and hybrid vehicles. Students taking this class will receive a GATE certificate of training in automotive materials technologies upon successful completion. 3 hours.

507. Interpretation of Microstructure. Interpretation of metal and ceramic microstructures with respect to their general type and origin and their relationship to their composition, type of phase diagram, processing, and the driving forces and kinetics of their evolution. The student will learn to identify the prior processing of a material and design means for modification to produce alternate structures. 3 hours.

508. Nanomaterials. The emphasis of this course will be to introduce the basic tools of nanotechnology, building blocks of nanostructured materials, the behavior of materials with nanoscale structures and their technological applications, including automotive, medical, and electronic, etc. 3 hours.

509. Principles of Metal Casting. Production and evaluation of cast ferrous metals (gray iron, ductile iron, steel) and non-ferrous metals (brass, bronze, aluminum). Design of castings and molds. Laboratory on the gating, risering and molten metal treatment, analysis and handling techniques required to produce high quality castings. 3 hours.

513.Composite Materials. Processing, structure, and properties of metal-, ceramic-, and polymer-matrix composite materials. Roles of interfacial bond strength, reinforcement type and orientation, and matrix selection in physical and mechanical properties of composite materials. 3 hours.

530.Polymeric Materials. (Also CH 580.) Processing methods, structure-engineering-property relationships, and applications of polymeric materials. 3 hours.

533.Nondestructive Evaluation of Materials. Principles, applications and limitation of ultrasonic, vibration, acoustic emission, radiographic, magnetic particle, eddy current and other nondestructive testing methods. Intelligent sensors and health monitoring of real structures. 3 hours.

564.Metals and Alloys. Microstructures, properties, heat treatment, and processing of ferrous and nonferrous materials. 3 hours.

565. Characterization of Materials. Theory and practice of materials characterization, with emphasis on optical metallography, quantitative metallography, scanning electron microscopy, crystallography, and x-ray diffraction. Specific application in metals and ceramics considered. 4 hours.

570. Ceramic Materials. Structure, processing, properties, and uses of ceramic compounds and glasses. Mechanical, thermal, and electrical behavior of ceramic materials in terms of microstructure and processing variables. 3 hours.

584.Electronic, Magnetic and Thermal Properties of Materials. Mechanisms behind rectifying junctions, transistors, paramagnetism, diamagnetism, and ferromagnetism. 3 hours.

601.Materials Science and Engineering Seminar. Required of all full-time M. S. students. 1 hour.

603.Thermodynamics of Materials. Atomistic and classical approaches to the understanding of the thermodynamics of solids, phase transformations, chemical reactions, and alloy systems. 3 hours.

613.Mechanical Behavior of Materials. Microstructural effects on the deformation mechanisms responsible for mechanical behavior of engineering materials. 3 hours.

614. Process Quality Engineering. Application of the concepts and tools of total quality to develop, implement, and maintain an effective quality assurance system in a materials processing and manufacturing environment. Students will be exposed to probability models, statistical tools, linear and multiple regression, DOE, TQM and six sigma. 3 hours.

615.Nucleation and Growth. Nucleation, growth, and phase transformations in materials. The roles of heterogeneities, boundaries, temperature, and free energy are addressed. 3 hours. 

616. Microstructural Processes. Theory and application of the principal microstructural processes in materials, including recrystallization, grain growth, coarsening, and sintering.    3 hours.

623.Solidification. Plane-front, cellular, and dendritic growth of single and polyphase alloys as applied to normal and directional solidification. Influence of epitaxy and convection on solidification structures. 3 hours.

631. Polymer Structures/Morphology. Application of x-ray and electron diffraction, light electron and atomic force microscopy to crystal structure and morphology of polymers. Morphology-processing-property relationships, deformation mechanisms and orientation characterization. 3 hours.

632. Polymer Processing. Introduction to polymer processing. Design and analysis of plastic products and processes based on knowledge of the composition and physical and rheological behavior of the polymers. Product properties will be correlated with processing-induced morphology. 3 hours.


633. Advanced Mechanics of Deformation. Basics and intermediate mechanics of deflection of beams and columns, mechanics of impact, failure theories, plastic deformation of materials, fracture mechanics, fatigue, creep and vibration. The topic will be supported by industry relevant case studies. Suggested prerequisites: Mechanics of Solid (CE 220) and Mechanical Behavior (MSE 382). 3 hours

634. Design and Manufacture Technologies for Automotive Applications. Basics of lightweight materials, avenues on automotive component designs, emerging processing technologies in lost foam casting, thermoplastic composites and testing methodologies. 3 hours.

635. Advanced Mechanics of Composites. Classical lamination theory, analysis and failure of reinforced composite material systems, anisotropic elasticity, stress analysis and design of laminated composites including 3D effects, stress concentrations, free-edge effects, hygrothermal behavior, adhesive and mechanical connections. 3 hours.

636. Engineering Fibers. Processing-microstructure-properties of different fibrous materials: natural polymeric fibers (jute, sisal, silk, etc.), synthetic polymeric fibers (aramid and polyethylene, etc.), metallic fibers, and high performance ceramic fibers (alumina and silicon carbide). Application of Weibull statistics to strength of fibrous materials, techniques of mechanical testing of fibers and applications of fibers in various fields. 3 hours.

637.Quantitative Microscopy. Quantitative description of microstructural features. Relationships between microstructural characteristics and properties. 3 hours.

643.Materials Characterization I. Fundamentals of materials characterization using electron and X-ray techniques. Topics include advanced crystallography, electron optics, and interactions of energetic electrons with solids. Some applications of X-ray diffraction will be addressed. Lecture and laboratory. 3 hours.

644.Materials Characterization II. Applications of materials characterization using electron and X-ray techniques. Topics include imaging and X-ray spectroscopy using scanning electron microscopy; imaging, diffraction, and X-ray spectroscopy using transmission electron microcopy; and advanced X-ray diffraction techniques. Lecture and laboratory. 3 hours.

653.Phase Diagrams. Analysis and interpretation of binary, ternary, and more complex phase diagrams including thermodynamic basis and construction. 3 hours.

667.Process Modeling and Simulation. Theory and practice of analytical methods and computational modeling for manufacturing processes of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites. Applications on processes such as metal cutting, welding, casting, massive forming, solidification, rapid prototyping, injection molding, and resin transfer molding. 3 hours.

690.Special Topics in (Area). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate study committee. 1-6 hours.

691.Individual Study in (Area). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate study committee. 1-6 hours.

698.Nonthesis Research. Prerequisite: Permission of mentor. 1-12 hours.

699.Thesis Research. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy and permission of mentor. 1-12 hours.

701.Materials Science and Engineering Seminar. Required of all full-time Ph.D. students. 1 hour.

703.Thermodynamics of Materials. Atomistic and classical approaches to the understanding of the thermodynamics of solids, phase transformations, chemical reactions, and alloy systems. 3 hours.

713.Mechanical Behavior of Materials. Microstructural effects on the deformation mechanisms responsible for mechanical behavior of engineering materials. 3 hours.
714. Process Quality Engineering. Application of the concepts and tools of total quality to develop, implement, and maintain an effective quality assurance system in a materials processing and manufacturing environment. Students will be exposed to probability models, statistical tools, linear and multiple regression, DOE, TQM and six sigma. 3 hours.

715.Nucleation and Growth. Nucleation, growth and phase transformations in materials. The roles of heterogeneities, boundaries, temperature, and free energy are addressed. 3 hours.

716.Microstructural Processes. Theory and application of the principal microstructural processes in materials, including recrystallization, grain growth, coarsening, and sintering. Prerequisite: MSE 615 or 715. 3 hours.

723.Solidification. Plane-front, cellular, and dendritic growth of single and polyphase alloys as applied to normal and directional solidification. Influence of epitaxy and convection on solidification structures. 3 hours.

731. Polymer Structures/Morphology. Application of x-ray and electron diffraction, light, electron and atomic force microscopy to crystal structure and morphology of polymers. Morphology-processing-property relationships, deformation mechanisms and orientation characterization. 3 hours. 

732. Polymer Processing. Introduction to polymer processing. Design and analysis of plastic products and processes based on knowledge of the composition and physical and rheological behavior of the polymers. Product properties will be correlated with processing-induced morphology. 3 hours.


733. Advanced Mechanics of Deformation. Basics and intermediate mechanics of deflection of beams and columns, mechanics of impact, failure theories, plastic deformation of materials, fracture mechanics, fatigue, creep and vibration. The topic will be supported by industry relevant case studies. Suggested prerequisites: Mechanics of Solid (CE 220) and Mechanical Behavior (MSE 382). 3 hours.

734. Design and Manufacture Technologies for Automotive Applications. Basics of lightweight materials, avenues on automotive component designs, emerging processing technologies in lost foam casting, thermoplastic composites and testing methodologies. 3 hours.

735. Advanced Mechanics of Composites. Classical lamination theory, analysis and failure of reinforced composite material systems, anistropic elasticity, stress analysis and design of laminated composites including 3D effects, stress concentrations, free-edge effects, hygrothermal behavior, adhesive and mechanical connections. 3 hours.

736. Engineering Fibers. Processing-microstructure-properties of different fibrous materials: natural polymeric fibers (jute, sisal, silk, etc.), synthetic polymeric fibers (aramid and polyethylene, etc.), metallic fibers, and high performance ceramic fibers (alumina and silicon carbide). Application of Weibull statistics to strength of fibrous materials, techniques of mechanical testing of fibers and applications of fibers in various fields. 3 hours.

737.Quantitative Microscopy. Quantitative description of microstructural features. Relationships between microstructural characteristics and properties. 3 hours.

743.Materials Characterization I. Fundamentals of materials characterization using electron and X-ray techniques. Topics include advanced crystallography, electron optics, and interactions of energetic electrons with solids. Some applications of X-ray diffraction will be addressed. Lecture and laboratory. 3 hours.

744.Materials Characterization II. Applications of materials characterization using electron and X-ray techniques. Topics include imaging and X-ray spectroscopy using scanning electron microscopy; imaging, diffraction, and X-ray spectroscopy using transmission electron microcopy; and advanced X-ray diffraction techniques. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: MSE 643 or 743. 3 hours.

753.Phase Diagrams. Analysis and interpretation of binary, ternary, and more complex phase diagrams including thermodynamic basis and construction. 3 hours.

767.Process Modeling and Simulation. Theory and practice of analytical methods and computational modeling for manufacturing processes of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites. Applications on processes such as metal cutting, welding, casting, massive forming, solidification, rapid prototyping, injection molding, and resin transfer molding. 3 hours.

790.Special Topics in (Area). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate study committee. 1-6 hours.

791.Individual Study in (Area). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate study committee. 1-6 hours.

798.Nondissertation Research. Prerequisite: Permission of mentor. 1-12 hours.

799.Dissertation Research. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy and permission of mentor. 1-12 hours.

NIBIB Supported T-32 Predoctoral Training Grant

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) has awarded an interdisciplinary predoctoral training grant to UAB that is entitled “Nanotechnology in Biosensors and Bioengineering”. It is a five year program that started on September 1, 2007. Benefits to participating graduate students include: graduate stipends of $25,000 per year, full tuition and health insurance, and a travel award of $1,000 per year. The purpose of this grant is to implement a training program at the interfaces of physics, chemistry, materials science and engineering, and biomedical engineering that will reduce the time from discovery of a new tool in nanotechnology to its application in medical devices, tissue engineering, and biosensors for earliest detection of molecular signatures of disease.

 

 



Last modified 06/10/12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





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