The “Grow With Canvas” conference will provide two days of panel discussions and training sessions geared toward UAB faculty.
UAB’s eLearning and Professional Studies (eLPS) will host a two-day Canvas awareness and training event, “Grow With Canvas,” on Wednesday, March 30 and Thursday, March 31, 2016. The event will include activities for UAB faculty, students, and staff. Canvas representatives will be in attendance.

Canvas on the Green

UAB faculty, students, and staff are invited to stop by the Campus Green on Wednesday March 30, from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Look for food trucks, music, appearances by Blaze and Panda (the Canvas mascot), and other activities. All are encouraged to stop by the tent for more information about the new Canvas User Interface that will be introduced this summer.

Grow With Canvas Conference

eLPS staff and Canvas representatives will present two days of panel discussions and training sessions on Wednesday and Thursday.

The panel discussions will be held on both days from 1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m., featuring different panelists each day. The panels will be comprised of UAB faculty members who will share their ideas on how they are using Canvas, technologies, media, and other methods to increase engagement and quality in their online and on-ground courses.

Three levels of training will be presented with morning and afternoon sessions available. Participants may choose to take one training track or all three during the course of the event. These will be hands-on training sessions; so, participants should bring their course materials. Laptops will be available during the training, but participants are encouraged to bring their own devices. The three training levels are:
  • Start: For new Canvas users. Learn about the dynamic syllabus and other basic tasks in Canvas. During this training session, you will begin setting up your course syllabus in Canvas. Please bring your course syllabus and other materials with you. Staff will be on hand to provide one-on-one assistance.
  • Cultivate: For intermediate Canvas users. Grow your Canvas skills by learning about tools for assignments and grading. Bring your course materials and we will help you begin to use the quizzes, gradebook, and other tools.
  • Bloom: For advanced Canvas users. Take your online and on-ground courses to the next level by incorporating multimedia, engagement tools, and other advanced technology. Bring your course materials and we will help you begin exploring the tools and opportunities.


Faculty News

  • UAB driving simulator lab has national debut live on TODAY
    UAB driving simulator lab has national debut live on TODAY
    Cutting-edge technology and research brings national attention to UAB.
    news today play btnClick image to watch the TODAY segmentNBC’s TODAY show traveled to Birmingham to hear from UAB College of Arts and Sciences distracted driving expert Despina Stavrinos, Ph.D.

    On April 29, TODAY show correspondent Jeff Rossen reported live from UAB’s Translational Research for Injury Prevention Lab about the dangers of using social media and texting while driving.

    The TRIP Lab recently became home to the world’s first SUV simulator, made possible through donations from Honda Manufacturing of Alabama and the Alabama Department of Transportation.

    With the new simulator, UAB researchers hope to facilitate solutions and best practices in motor-vehicle-related safety and crash prevention, addressing the major public health problem of highway and traffic-related injuries and death. 

  • Debunking digital eyestrain and blue light myths
    Debunking digital eyestrain and blue light myths
    Adam Gordon, O.D., discusses blue light, including the lack of clinical evidence in advertisements overstating dangers, as well as the effects of blue light on sleep and eye discomfort.

    Nearly 90 percent of adults use digital devices for two or more hours per day, according to The Vision Council’s 2016 Digital Eye Strain Report, exposing consumers to blue light that some suggest is dangerous.

    Adam Gordon, O.D., clinical associate professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry, believes overuse and exposure to blue light may lead to eyestrain and focusing problems, but does not appear to cause long-term harm, eye disease or damage to the retina.

    “Lens manufacturers have jumped on the band wagon of harmful blue light and are creating products that they claim will protect your eyes from macular degeneration or other eye diseases,” Gordon said. “Blue light more often causes eye discomfort and annoyance than physical harm. It is important to understand what blue light is, where the accusations of hazard and threat of blue light come from, and how it truly affects your vision.”NYCU eyes1

    What is blue light?

    Part of the visible light spectrum, blue light is the high-energy light just beyond the potentially harmful ultraviolet light.

    Blue light is normally transmitted through the eye to the retina, because it is visible light that our eyes are designed to receive. Light is visible to the eye and triggers the visual process that leads to vision and sight.

    A large body of experimental and clinical evidence over 20-30 years shows that UV light can be harmful to the eye and contribute to diseases such as cataracts, pterygia or growths on the front of the eye, and perhaps macular degeneration. Most eyeglass and sunglass lenses and many contact lenses have been developed to block out UV light.

    Compact fluorescent light bulbs, high-intensity headlights and other LED lighting do emit higher blue light energy than more traditional incandescent light bulbs, causing excess exposure to blue light than we received before. Digital devices such as TV screens, computer monitors, cellphones and tablets also emit significant levels of blue light. The higher levels of blue light place more strain on the eye’s focusing system than do printed materials. nycu eyes 2

    Is blue light harmful to the eyes?

    Digital eyestrain refers to blurred vision and other symptoms such as burning, stinging or tearing of the eyes associated with prolonged use of digital devices. Digital eyestrain leads to dry eyes and puts strain on the muscles that help the eye focus. When staring at a digital device, the eye does not blink as frequently, and this causes faster disruption and evaporation of the tear film that protects the ocular surface. When the surface of the eye begins to dry, irritation is felt, such as burning and stinging.

    When viewing digital devices, the eyes are looking at a pixelated image that is rapidly alternating or flickering multiple times per second. It is much harder for the visual system to maintain a sharp or consistent focus on an electronic image compared to a hard image.

    There are numerous eyeglass lenses now available to selectively block out the high-energy blue light that contributes to the fatigue and strain placed on the eye’s focusing system. For people who spend significant hours on a computer or other digital device, these lenses may provide some relief and comfort.

    To further maintain comfortable vision while using digital devices, it is important to use the 20/20/20 rule. For every 20 minutes of digital device use, look away for 20 seconds focusing on something 20 feet away. Using artificial tear or lubricant drops may also relieve some symptoms of dryness.

    There is some early laboratory research using animal models that suggests excessive blue light exposure can damage some sensitive cell layers of the retina. There is no clinical evidence at the present time that links blue light exposure from digital devices to any pathology or disease of the eye.

    “Some advertisements from lens manufacturers are misleading consumers to believe that blue light from digital devices will cause serious harm to their eyes,” Gordon said. “Products created to block out blue light minimize eyestrain when using computers and digital devices, but have not been tested or shown to prevent any type of eye disease.”

    Macular degeneration and other eye diseases in relation to blue light is the great unknown. The main risk factors for these eye diseases are age, genetic factors, UV light, smoking and poor nutrition more than digital device use.nycu eyes 3

    Benefits of blue light

    One of the physiological benefits of visual light, specifically blue light, is the relationship with our internal circadian clock. As part of the sleep/wake cycle, blue light triggers the suppression of melatonin in the brain, keeping us awake. This tells us when we are tired or should be awake.

    “We are not designed to be using our phones and tablets 6 inches from our faces, particularly when we are lying in bed with the TV on,” Gordon said. “This is suppressing the melatonin, making it more difficult for a good night’s rest and REM sleep.”  

    Turn off your devices one to two hours before going to bed to trigger the release of melatonin, giving it a chance to increase just before dozing off into deep sleep.

  • First-of-its-kind driving simulator lab at UAB powered by donation from Honda Manufacturing of Alabama and ALDOT
    First-of-its-kind driving simulator lab at UAB powered by donation from Honda Manufacturing of Alabama and ALDOT
    The facility will enable new distracted-driving research, addressing a major public health issue that is a leading cause of highway and traffic-related injuries and death.

    During Distracted Driving Awareness Month, UAB has opened the first SUV driving simulator laboratory in the world.

    In the development of this lab, UAB partnered with Honda Manufacturing of Alabama, which provided a full-bodied 2016 Honda Pilot built at their factory in Lincoln, Ala., to be retrofitted with state-of-the-art simulator technology funded by the Alabama Department of Transportation. The technology gives UAB researchers the opportunity to conduct important safety studies involving distracted driving practices.

    Representatives from Honda, ALDOT and Alabama’s Office of the Attorney General joined the UAB team to announce the new initiative at a grand opening this week.

    “Honda Manufacturing of Alabama is honored to partner with UAB in this important project, with the goal of saving lives by increasing awareness of distracted driving,” said HMA Vice President Mike Oatridge. “Honda is very pleased we could donate the most advanced Honda Pilot ever built in Alabama, which has a five-star crash safety rating and features Honda most advanced safety features including the full range of Honda Sensing technology.”

    The goal of this effort is to facilitate solutions and best practices in motor-vehicle-related safety and crash prevention, addressing the major public health problem of highway and traffic-related injuries and death. 

    “Data tell us that distracted driving is a factor in nearly 50 percent of car crashes, which translates to one million injury-producing crashes each year,” said Despina Stavrinos, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology in UAB’s College of Arts and Sciences and director of the UAB Translational Research for Injury Prevention Laboratory. “Ten percent of those crashes result in a fatality. Understanding which factors influence an individual’s likelihood to engage in distracted driving is essential to being able to purposefully address this growing problem. With this new simulator, we will be able to gain new information about how drivers participate in distracted behavior, giving us valuable insight that can increase the effectiveness of educational campaigns and improve driving safety.”

    news Driving Simulator 2The core of Stavrinos’ work is the prevention of injury, particularly unintentional injuries like those that result from distracted driving behaviors. She will lead her TRIP Lab in conducting studies with the new simulator.

    The first study, set to begin in a couple of weeks, will focus on teens and adults over 65, two of the most vulnerable populations when it comes to distracted driving.

    The simulator is intended to be available to researchers from all appropriate disciplines throughout UAB, other universities in the state, and even throughout the Southeast. In addition, non-university research scientists will be afforded access to the simulator and its associated support services.

    “UAB really thrives on investing in resources that are going to allow multidisciplinary research to take place,” said Richard Marchase, Ph.D., vice president for research and economic development at UAB. “With this new technology, which we are very thankful to Honda Manufacturing of Alabama and ALDOT for helping us create, we will be able to do just that and make this facility a destination for collaboration and innovation for researchers across campus and beyond. It will be a resource that I’m sure will be game-changing.”

    “Honda Manufacturing of Alabama is honored to partner with UAB in this important project, with the goal of saving lives by increasing awareness of distracted driving,” said HMA Vice President Mike Oatridge. “Honda is very pleased we could donate the most advanced Honda Pilot ever built in Alabama, which has a five-star crash safety rating and features Honda's most advanced safety features, including the full range of Honda Sensing technology.”

    Individuals interested in utilizing these resources or contributing should contact Stavrinos at dstavrin@uab.edu or (205) 934-7861. 

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