Saturday, April 12 and Saturday April 19 have been designated as official university classroom makeup days for those classes that need to conduct face-to-face makeup sessions.
Due to recent winter-weather closings, UAB has adjusted the calendar for Spring Semester as described below:

Official Class Makeup Options

The following Saturdays have been designated as official university classroom makeup days for those classes that need to conduct face-to-face makeup sessions.
  • Saturday, April 12 is the makeup day for classes that meet on Tuesdays and/or Thursdays.
  • Saturday, April 19 is the makeup day for classes that meet on Mondays, Wednesdays and/or Fridays.

If you intend to hold an additional class on either of those days at your regularly scheduled timestrong>, please email registrar@uab.edu by March 21st to confirm classroom. Please contact Tina Collins in the Office of Registrar at 934-8152 if you have questions.

Whether your classes will meet on these days is at your discretion. In addition, we encourage you to consider other options, such as restructuring scheduled class time or using electronic strategies.

Faculty News

  • New book by UAB professor examines the role of African-American educators during the Birmingham civil rights movement
    New book by UAB professor examines the role of African-American educators during the Birmingham civil rights movement
    After more than 10 years of archival research and interviews with 45 African-American educators, Tondra Loder-Jackson, Ph.D., reveals their experiences and contributions to the movement.

    tondra loder jackson2Birmingham is rich with stories about the civil rights movement and the prominent leaders, local activists and even children who fought for social change, but little is known about the role educators played during that time.

    A new book by University of Alabama at Birmingham professor Tondra Loder-Jackson, Ph.D., examines the role that African-American educators played in the Birmingham civil rights movement from the late 19th century to the present day.

    “This is the first book of its kind that is devoted primarily to the multigenerational perspectives of African-American educators in the South and how they perceived their roles and contributions to the civil rights movement,” said Loder-Jackson. “I wasn’t born in Birmingham, but I grew up here. My early experiences of attending Birmingham schools during the period of desegregation are part of what shaped my interest in this topic.”

    Schoolhouse Activists: African American Educators and the Long Birmingham Civil Rights Movement” revisits the longstanding debate about whether educators were friends or foes of the civil rights movement. The book is the culmination of more than 10 years of archival research and interviews. Loder-Jackson has found that African-American educators in Birmingham were involved in both the front lines of the movement and behind the scenes in ways that are not easily noticeable to most scholars and the general public.

    “Educators spent time teaching students about social justice issues and the perils of Jim Crow,” said Loder-Jackson. “Many of them supported students when they learned of their interest in participating in the movement. An example of this is not reporting students to school administrators when they chose to skip class to participate in the Children’s Crusade. They faced opposition while fighting for benefits such as sick leave. Some even lost their jobs fighting for equal pay.”

    loder jackson book streamThe book is divided into two parts. Part I chronicles the history of Birmingham education in relation to African-American educators between the late 19th century and the mid-20th-century classical phase of the movement, which began in 1954 with the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education. In Part II, Loder-Jackson shares the memories and experiences of 45 African-American educators who came of age before, during and after the classical movement. She hopes the book will serve as a resource for current educators, community activists and students grappling with contemporary struggles for educational justice.

    “I’m not sure if some of our teachers today are aware of the impact they can have to change schools and society,” Loder-Jackson said. “We live in a time now where many teachers feel they are being dictated to by external entities like federal and state governments. I think it’s important for K-12 educators in particular to know that they have a history of activism and advocacy, and in the past they have been empowered to effect change in schools.”

    Loder-Jackson is an associate professor in the UAB School of Education Department of Human Studies. She will conduct her first campus book talk on Thursday, Feb. 18, from 4-6 p.m., at the UAB Hill Student Center, 1400 University Blvd., Room 203. The book talk is sponsored by the UAB Center for Urban Education and the African American Faculty Association

    To learn more about “Schoolhouse Activists: African American Educators and the Long Birmingham Civil Rights Movement,” click here. The first chapter of the book is available to read online.

  • Collat School of Business dean to be honored at A.G. Gaston Conference
    Collat School of Business dean to be honored at A.G. Gaston Conference
    Jack recognized for innovation in business and education in memory of Birmingham’s A.G. Gaston.

    eric jack 2016Eric Jack, Ph.D., dean of UAB’s Collat School of Business, will receive an award during a conference honoring the memory of a revered Birmingham businessman and civil rights activist.

    Each year, the A.G. Gaston Conference recognizes members of the community who embody characteristics of the late Gaston.

    During the 2016 A.G. Gaston Conference, organizers will present awards to Jack and to Perry Ward, Ph.D., president of Lawson State Community College. In honoring two educators, this year’s conference celebrates the memory of Gaston and his passionate support of education and the role it plays in allowing people to advance in business and society.

    Dean Jack will be recognized for his innovative approach to including members from different industries, such as the medical community, into UAB’s business programs.

    Students from the Collat School of Business will also play a role in the conference through the unveiling of their study focused on making Birmingham attractive to millennial entrepreneurs. 

    The awards will be presented during the A.G. Gaston Legacy Luncheon on Wednesday, Feb. 17, at the Birmingham-Jefferson Convention Complex. For more information or to register for the conference, visit www.aggastonconference.com.

  • UAB Psychology professor given early career award
    UAB Psychology professor given early career award
    Faculty member honored for significant contributions to the field.

    despina stavrinos 2016Despina Stavrinos, Ph.D., has been selected to receive the Routh Early Career Award from the Society of Pediatric Psychology.

    This national award recognizes an early career member of the society who has made significant contributions to the field of pediatric psychology in research, clinical training and service.

    Stavrinos, an assistant professor in the College of Arts and SciencesDepartment of Psychology, studies distracted driving, with particular attention to at-risk populations.

    She serves as the director of the Translational Research for Injury Prevention, or TRIP, laboratory. The focus of the lab’s research is the prevention and control of unintentional injuries that result from motor vehicle crashes.

    The TRIP lab offers students at various levels of training, from high school to postdoctoral, and from various disciplines the opportunity to conduct high-quality behavioral research. Since its establishment in 2009, nearly 100 students have been trained under Stavrinos’ mentorship.

    The award will be presented at the Society of Pediatric Psychology’s annual conference in April.

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