Saturday, April 12 and Saturday April 19 have been designated as official university classroom makeup days for those classes that need to conduct face-to-face makeup sessions.
Due to recent winter-weather closings, UAB has adjusted the calendar for Spring Semester as described below:

Official Class Makeup Options

The following Saturdays have been designated as official university classroom makeup days for those classes that need to conduct face-to-face makeup sessions.
  • Saturday, April 12 is the makeup day for classes that meet on Tuesdays and/or Thursdays.
  • Saturday, April 19 is the makeup day for classes that meet on Mondays, Wednesdays and/or Fridays.

If you intend to hold an additional class on either of those days at your regularly scheduled timestrong>, please email registrar@uab.edu by March 21st to confirm classroom. Please contact Tina Collins in the Office of Registrar at 934-8152 if you have questions.

Whether your classes will meet on these days is at your discretion. In addition, we encourage you to consider other options, such as restructuring scheduled class time or using electronic strategies.

Faculty News

New hope for potential prostate cancer patients
New hope for potential prostate cancer patients
It has been more than 30 years since the last major advancement in prostate cancer screening technology, and the latest advancement is now available in the Southeast only at UAB.

nix bahramiSoroush Rais-Bahrami, far right, and Jeffrey NixThe latest advancement in prostate cancer detection is magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy, which offers benefits for both patient and physician.

The only place in the Southeast offering the MRI-US image fusion technique is at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Program for Personalized Prostate Cancer Care.

It is estimated that 2014 will see more than 240,000 new cases of prostate cancer, and more than 29,000 deaths from the disease, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Jeffrey Nix, M.D., along with colleague Soroush Rais-Bahrami, M.D., both assistant professors in the UAB Department of Urology, studied the MRI-US image fusion as fellows at the NCI. Nix and Rais-Bahrami are two of a select few urologists in the United States trained to utilize this technology; together they have five years’ experience using this approach.

Nix and Rais-Bahrami say this new technology offers a “targeted biopsy,” which refers to direct tissue sampling of suspicious areas seen on MRI as opposed to the traditional method of random, systematic sampling that is essentially performed “blindly” in different “ZIP code” regions of the prostate.

“We are utilizing prostate MRI and fusing it with real-time ultrasound for image-guided prostate biopsies; this can detect prostate cancer with high accuracy, and it accurately targets lesions of concern defined by MRI,” Nix said. “This improves overall detection compared to standard biopsy and, more importantly, has the potential to give clinicians and patients a more accurate picture of their true disease burden by allowing improvements in staging.”

Studies of this new technique have shown that it increases the overall cancer detection rate, increases the high-risk cancer detection rate, and improves staging for patients who are considering active surveillance, which is when your doctor closely monitors your low-risk prostate cancer for any changes.

Studies of this new technique, Nix says, have shown that it increases the overall cancer detection rate, increases the high-risk cancer detection rate, and improves staging for patients who are considering active surveillance, which is when your doctor closely monitors your low-risk prostate cancer for any changes.

“The technique is expected to be especially helpful in cases of men with a history of negative biopsies who are still suspected of having cancer due to a persistently unexplained elevated prostate-specific antigen level, patients with enlarged prostates and patients being guided toward active surveillance for improved staging,” said Rais-Bahrami.

Rais-Bahrami adds that MRI-US fusion-guided biopsy is a clinic-based procedure that can be performed under local anesthesia; the patient’s experience of this new biopsy versus traditional biopsy without MRI guidance is the same, but with more accurate outcomes based on the targeting approach.

“I have a patient who had five previous biopsy sessions over the past seven years, and he’s had persistently elevated PSA, yet each biopsy came back negative,” Rais-Bahrami said. “When he came to us and had the MRI-US fusion-guided biopsy, we were able to target areas that we identified with our radiologists as areas of concern, and one in fact came back as cancerous. This is probably what’s been there causing his PSA elevation all this time; however, it was hidden to all these biopsy sessions over the past seven years.”

“We’ve been offering this technology at UAB for the last year, and we’ve seen a lot of success,” Nix said. “I have had several patients who were on active surveillance, and the MRI-US fusion biopsy discovered significantly more extensive disease. Those patients were able to go on to treatment and to cancer cure. It turned out some patients had prostate cancer even after they had multiple biopsies that came back negative; this enabled them to make more informed decisions on appropriate treatment.”

“This is the first major advancement in prostate cancer detection in more than 30 years, and it’s a significant improvement,” Nix said.

Visit UAB Medicine to learn more, or call 205-934-9999 or 800-UAB-8816 to schedule an appointment. 

Electroacoustic work by Price chosen for composers' conference
Electroacoustic work by Price chosen for composers' conference
Price’s work “Triptych: Three Studies in Gesture and Noise” will be presented at the Atlanta conference Nov. 13-14.

william price 2014A new electroacoustic composition by University of Alabama at Birmingham Associate Professor of Music William Price, DMA, will be presented as part of the National Association of Composers USA conference in Atlanta.

Hosted by the Georgia State University School of Music, the conference will feature works by composers from around the country. Price’s work “Triptych: Three Studies in Gesture and Noise” will be presented at the conference Nov. 13-14. 

“‘Triptych’ explores and develops artifacts found in the spaces between recorded sounds,” Price said of the work. “It is a three-part assemblage based primarily on noise, musical remnants and studio debris.” 

Founded by Henry Hadley in 1933, NACUSA is one of the oldest organizations devoted to the promotion and performance of American concert hall music.

UAB research examines youth sports injury rates
UAB research examines youth sports injury rates
Study explores patterns such as top 5 most common sports and recreation injuries.

children injuries chart 500Click to enlargeResearchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have taken an in-depth look at patterns in pediatric sports-related injuries in a new study published in the Journal of Athletic Training.

The study suggests that tailoring safety regulations more closely by age could impact the incidence of injury. It examined records of more than 2.5 million children ages 1-18 who were seen in hospital emergency departments for sports or recreation injuries during an eight-year study period. Among those, the five most common causes across all of childhood were basketball, football, bicycling, playgrounds and soccer.

David Schwebel, Ph.D., associate dean for Research in the Sciences and professor in the Department of Psychology, and Carl Brezausek, M.S., former researcher in the Center for Educational Accountability and instructor in the UAB School of Education, analyzed data spanning 2001-08 from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, a database of injuries treated at hospital emergency departments.

“There are huge numbers of children in the United States who play sports,” said Schwebel, who directs the UAB Youth Safety Lab. “Injuries can and do occur when children are active in sports-related activies, and often they could be prevented.”

The study focused on patterns in injury incidents by exact age and gender. Epidemiology studies on injury often divide children into five-year age spans that fail to precisely account for developmental differences, Schwebel says.

“We see this most clearly in the early years. Children show increasing independence from their parents, and they’re learning what their body can and can’t do. Children have to constantly evaluate their body’s capacity in terms of balancing, reaching, jumping or leaping, or hitting an opponent or a teammate. Part of that evaluation is physical, part of it is judgment, and part is in cognitive and decision-making skills."

“Five-year spans are the historical breakdown of most epidemiological data,” he said. “With adults, that breakdown makes sense. There’s not a huge difference between a 40-year-old and a 44-year-old in terms of injury risk, but there is a huge difference between a 1-year-old and a 4-year-old or even between a 5-year-old and a 9-year-old.

“We see this most clearly in the early years. Children show increasing independence from their parents, and they’re learning what their body can and can’t do. Children have to constantly evaluate their body’s capacity in terms of balancing, reaching, jumping or leaping, or hitting an opponent or a teammate. Part of that evaluation is physical, part of it is judgment, and part is in cognitive and decision-making skills.”

The data showed injuries related to certain recreation activities peaking around specific ages — playground-related injuries remained relevant up to age 9 — while activities such as bicycling caused injuries throughout the age span. Injuries peaked overall at age 14. Bowling caused the most injuries to children at the youngest age (age 4), and camping and personal watercraft caused the most injuries to the oldest (age 18).

However, Schwebel emphasized that the study should not discourage parents from allowing children to participate in sports and recreation activities.

“There are more positives than negatives,” he said. “We should continue to preach safety in activities that are organized and activities that are unorganized. I think it’s the task of parents, coaches, school administrators and even children themselves to be wary that injuries can and do occur and that most are preventable.”

Announcements

Video Reports