Workshops on Dialoguing


Instructors:

Ms. Monita C. Thompson
Dr. Charles F. Behling
Co-Directors, The Program on Intergroup Dialogue
The University of Michigan

The Program on Intergroup Relations at The University of Michigan is the oldest Intergroup Dialogue program in American higher education. The program has been recognized by President Clinton’s Initiative on Race, the US Department of Education's Gender Equity Expert Panel, the American Association of Higher Education, the American College Personnel Association, the National Association of Student Personnel, and the Theodore M. Hesburgh Awards Program of TIAA-CREF.

Advance Problem-Based Experiential Dialogue Workshop

Oct 11, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm
Nursing Building Room GO27 (NB GO27)

This is a workshop designed for faculty and staff who have attended our prior workshops, or who are engaged in difficult dialogue projects, or who otherwise have significant experience in social justice education. The workshop will focus on real challenges experienced on the UAB campus in classroom discussions and other co-curricular activities.  Participants will engage in applied activities, including role plays and facilitation practice.


Preparing for Difficult Dialogues and Discussions

Oct 12, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Business Engineering Complex Room 215 (BEC 215)

This workshop is designed for those interested in exploring how to initiate dialogue or discussions that may be controversial or have the potential for conflict.  We will discuss ways to achieve productive educational outcomes from such difficult dialogues.  Participants will gain basic theoretical knowledge of the concepts of intergroup relations and engage in experiential activities.  A packet of sample exercises will be provided for participants to use in their future work.

Pre-registration is required through the UAB Training & Development site or via Blazernet on the faculty resources tab. Registration for these free workshops is first-come, first-served.


PAST WORKSHOPS:

How to Facilitate Discussions of Racism and Other Difficult Topics

April 19, 8:30-11:30 am
April 19, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
April 20, 9:00-12 noon

Workshop offers participants concrete strategies, methods, and exercises for use in classroom discussions of racism and other controversial topics. Drawing from the literature on Intergroup Relations and Dialogues, workshop facilitators will present theory and data about why discussions of “–ism’s” may require a unique pedagogy, providing examples, materials, and applied exercises that can be utilized in the classroom. Case studies of challenging situations will be discussed.

Dialogue theory suggests that learning about racism and other issues of social diversity is strongest when emotional, experiential learning is incorporated with more traditional cognitive learning. Moreover, learning is strongest when there is a focus on differential power and privilege between social groups. In addition, conflict is seen as a primary teaching opportunity, and emphasis is placed on normalizing and managing conflict within the classroom.

The Program on Intergroup Relations at The University of Michigan is the oldest Intergroup Dialogue program in American higher education. The program has been recognized by President Clinton’s Initiative on Race, the US Department of Education's Gender Equity Expert Panel, the American Association of Higher Education, the American College Personnel Association, the National Association of Student Personnel, and the Theodore M. Hesburgh Awards Program of TIAA-CREF.

Participants may attend multiple sessions of this workshop. While each workshop will introduce similar basic theory and methodology, they will differ in the case studies presented and in the concerns raised for discussion by workshop participants.