Student Spotlight

Kuzynski_Maria

Maria Kuzynski

Mentor: Dobrawa Napierala, PhD
Department: Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery
Undergrad: BS, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

7ReasonsSquareWelcome to the Cell, Molecular, and Developmental Biology (CMDB) PhD Theme, a part of the Graduate Biomedical Sciences program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine. The CMDB theme is designed to provide maximum flexibility that results in students who are prepared to launch into a career in the emerging biomedical science field. Our graduates have exciting careers in scientific research in both academic and industrial settings; scientific-related writing, business, law, bioterrorism, forensics, administration, and education. 

About Us: CMDB is a cross-disciplinary theme at a leading research University in the sunny south, consisting of a diverse group of scientists and physicians who have a collective interest in fundamental processes in cell, molecular, and developmental biology and how alterations in these processes result inhuman diseases and birth defects.

About UAB: We are consistently one of the top 25 NIH funded research institutions in the U.S. and with faculty from over 30 departments across campus there are many opportunities for you in new and exciting areas of biomedical research. And, UAB is a leader in innovative technology such as whole genome sequencing, electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, crystallography, flow cytometry, drug discovery and others.

Contact Us: We are always searching for the brightest and most dedicated students to join our highly competitive CMDB theme and experience firsthand our cutting edge science. This is your personal invitation to explore the many possible opportunities offered by CMDB at UAB. Please explore this web site and apply today!
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  • An interdisciplinary UAB research team hopes to learn more about how emotions might keep people from getting enough exercise. Losing weight is one of the most common New Year’s resolutions, but many people struggle to get enough exercise to make such a resolution stick. University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers want to help women get more exercise by finding out the underlying issues that might keep them from exercising. Researchers are recruiting women ages 25-44 with a body mass index of 25-29.9 kg/m2 to join the Counseling and Activity Lifestyle Modification (CALM) Study. Jane Roy, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of EducationDepartment of Human Studies, is leading the study supported by colleagues and students in the Kinesiology, Health Education and Counselor Education programs and the UAB Nutrition Obesity Research Center Physical Activity and Exercise Core. “Exercise really is medicine,” Roy said. “Physicians know exercise works and everyone knows they should do it,...

  • Research to Prevent Blindness has given UAB’s Department of Ophthalmology a grant to further research of retinal and optic nerve diseasesResearch to Prevent Blindness has awarded a grant of $115,000 to the Department of Ophthalmology in the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine to support research into the causes, treatment and prevention of blinding diseases. “We are very appreciative of the generous support from Research to Prevent Blindness. This grant will enable us to accelerate promising lines of research related to retinal and optic nerve diseases. These are the major areas of focus where UAB research can potentially lead to new treatments and cures for blinding disease,” said Christopher Girkin, M.D., EyeSight Foundation of Alabama chair of the UAB Department of Ophthalmology.  RPB is the world’s leading voluntary organization supporting eye research. To date, the organization has awarded grants totaling $4,070,000 to the UAB School of Medicine. Since it was founded...

  • A new study says that the cost of a medication may play a very important role in a patient’s perception of whether it works.People’s perceptions of the cost of a drug may affect how much they benefit from the drug — even when they are receiving only a placebo. The finding, from a new study of people with Parkinson’s disease led by Alberto J. Espay, M.D., of the University of Cincinnati, and Jerzy P. Szaflarski, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, is published in the Jan. 28, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. “Patients’ expectations play an important role in the effectiveness of their treatments, and the placebo effect has been well-documented, especially in people with Parkinson’s disease,” said Espay, study author. “We wanted to see if the people’s perceptions of the cost of the drug they received would affect the...

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