Student Spotlight

Nichols_Jessica

Jessica Nichols

Undergrad: BS, Aurora University

Welcome to the Cell, Molecular, and Developmental Biology (CMDB) PhD Theme, a part of the Graduate Biomedical Sciences program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine. The CMDB theme is designed to provide maximum flexibility that results in students who are prepared to launch into a career in the emerging biomedical science field. Our graduates have exciting careers in scientific research in both academic and industrial settings; scientific-related writing, business, law, bioterrorism, forensics, administration, and education. 

About Us: CMDB is a cross-disciplinary theme at a leading research University in the sunny south, consisting of a diverse group of scientists and physicians who have a collective interest in fundamental processes in cell, molecular, and developmental biology and how alterations in these processes result inhuman diseases and birth defects.

About UAB: We are consistently one of the top 25 NIH funded research institutions in the U.S. and with faculty from over 30 departments across campus there are many opportunities for you in new and exciting areas of biomedical research. And, UAB is a leader in innovative technology such as whole genome sequencing, electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, crystallography, flow cytometry, drug discovery and others.

Contact Us: We are always searching for the brightest and most dedicated students to join our highly competitive CMDB theme and experience firsthand our cutting edge science. This is your personal invitation to explore the many possible opportunities offered by CMDB at UAB. Please explore this web site and apply today!
No events found
GCalendar
  • UAB researchers find a chemical pathway — a glutamate transporter — that may be causing seizures and shorten survival rates for patients with brain tumors.Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have identified a chemical pathway that may be associated with seizures and shorter patient survival in some patients with malignant glioma, the most common and deadly form of brain tumor. In findings published May 27 in Science Translational Medicine, the researchers suggest that a transporter known as SXC is responsible for boosting levels of glutamate in the brains of some glioma patients. System x­c-(SXC) expression in human glioma cells growing in vitro. The catalytic subunitof SXC, SLC7A11/xCT (green) is highly expressed in approximately half of gliomas. The cell structure (red) and nuclei (blue) show the morphology of these glioma cells. Confocal image by Stephanie Robert and Ian Kimbrough.Glutamate is a vital neurotransmitter in the brain; but increased expression of...

  • Stylish but dangerous? UAB study looks at injuries caused by wearing high-heeled shoes.Americans love high-heeled shoes. One survey in 2003 reported that 62 percent of American women wore shoes with a 2-inch or greater heel on a regular basis. Those shoes are taking a toll. New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham shows that high-heeled-shoe-related injuries doubled between 2002 and 2012. The findings were published online May 12 in the Journal of Foot and Ankle Injuries, and the frequency and severity of those injuries were sufficient to make the investigators suggest that wearing the appropriate shoes for the appropriate occasion and being aware of one’s surroundings are good ideas. “Although high-heeled shoes might be stylish, from a health standpoint, it would be worthwhile for those interested in wearing high-heeled shoes to understand the risks and the potential harm that precarious activities in high-heeled shoes can cause,” said lead investigator Gerald...

  • UAB was part of a promising international study of a combination therapy for patients with the most common cystic fibrosis mutation.The combination of two drugs — an investigational drug used in conjunction with an already FDA-approved medication — improved lung function in patients with one form of cystic fibrosis, according to two new studies. The findings, published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine, indicate the medications improve lung function in patients with the F508del mutation, the most common CF mutation. CF is caused by defective or missing CFTR proteins at the cell surface that result from mutations in the CFTR gene. “Two studies, Traffic and Transport, looked at two medications developed by Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated: lumacaftor and ivacaftor,” said Steven Rowe, M.D., professor in the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Rowe was a co-investigator of the international, multicenter studies. “The...

Epi Menu