Student Spotlight

Kuzynski_Maria

Maria Kuzynski

Mentor: Dobrawa Napierala, PhD
Department: Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery
Undergrad: BS, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

7ReasonsSquareWelcome to the Cell, Molecular, and Developmental Biology (CMDB) PhD Theme, a part of the Graduate Biomedical Sciences program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine. The CMDB theme is designed to provide maximum flexibility that results in students who are prepared to launch into a career in the emerging biomedical science field. Our graduates have exciting careers in scientific research in both academic and industrial settings; scientific-related writing, business, law, bioterrorism, forensics, administration, and education. 

About Us: CMDB is a cross-disciplinary theme at a leading research University in the sunny south, consisting of a diverse group of scientists and physicians who have a collective interest in fundamental processes in cell, molecular, and developmental biology and how alterations in these processes result inhuman diseases and birth defects.

About UAB: We are consistently one of the top 25 NIH funded research institutions in the U.S. and with faculty from over 30 departments across campus there are many opportunities for you in new and exciting areas of biomedical research. And, UAB is a leader in innovative technology such as whole genome sequencing, electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, crystallography, flow cytometry, drug discovery and others.

Contact Us: We are always searching for the brightest and most dedicated students to join our highly competitive CMDB theme and experience firsthand our cutting edge science. This is your personal invitation to explore the many possible opportunities offered by CMDB at UAB. Please explore this web site and apply today!
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  • BCRFA continues to provide substantial gifts to UAB Cancer Center to accelerate breast cancer research.The Breast Cancer Research Foundation of Alabama presented $650,000 — its largest donation to date — to the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center, for a total exceeding $5.1 million since BCRFA’s inception in 1996. BCRFA has made an annual donation to the Cancer Center with proceeds from all its fundraising efforts during the previous year, including BCRFA events, corporate and individual donations, and sales of the breast cancer specialty license plate tags. “We are extremely thankful for this generous gift. Without the help of the community, none of this would be possible,” said Edward Partridge, M.D., director of the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center. “If I could clone exactly what BCRFA does for breast cancer research and care for all of our other cancer areas, we would make tremendous breakthroughs, as we have done with breast cancer.” BCRFA provides pilot funding...

  • A UAB researcher is looking for clues in the cell walls of fungi to alleviate severe fungal reactions in patients with asthma.Many persons with asthma are also allergic to common fungi and mold, and a reaction to those allergens can exacerbate asthma symptoms. Researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham have received a $1.75 million, four-year grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, one of the National Institutes of Health, to better understand how a fungal reaction affects asthma and to search for ways to interfere in that process and reduce the severity of fungal asthma. “The overarching goal of this research is to identify mechanisms associated with the recognitionof fungi that contribute to the severity of fungal asthma,” said Chad Steele, Ph.D., professor in the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine and primary investigator of the new study. “We want to see how and why...

  • Together with European partners, UAB unravels basis of Singleton-Merten Syndrome, which causes heart calcification and early periodontitis.Mary MacDougallAn international group co-led by University of Alabama at Birmingham researcher Mary MacDougall, Ph.D., has unraveled the molecular basis for the rare, inherited genetic disorder, Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS). Individuals with SMS develop extreme, life-threatening calcification of the aorta and heart valves, early-onset periodontitis and root resorption of the teeth, decreases in bone density, and loss of bone tissue at the tips of fingers and toes. The cause of SMS is a missense mutation that changes a single amino acid in the protein MDA5 from arginine to glutamine, MacDougall and colleagues are reporting today (Jan. 22) in the online version of The American Journal of Human Genetics. That change in MDA5 — which detects viral double-stranded RNA as part of the innate immunity system — causes increased induction of interferon beta. Thus SMS is recognized...

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