Student Spotlight

Thompson Emily CMDBIMG 0386

Emily Thompson

Entered: 2013
BS, University of Tennessee - Knoxville

Welcome to the Cell, Molecular, and Developmental Biology (CMDB) PhD Theme, a part of the Graduate Biomedical Sciences program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine. The CMDB theme is designed to provide maximum flexibility that results in students who are prepared to launch into a career in the emerging biomedical science field. Our graduates have exciting careers in scientific research in both academic and industrial settings; scientific-related writing, business, law, bioterrorism, forensics, administration, and education. 

About Us: CMDB is a cross-disciplinary theme at a leading research University in the sunny south, consisting of a diverse group of scientists and physicians who have a collective interest in fundamental processes in cell, molecular, and developmental biology and how alterations in these processes result inhuman diseases and birth defects.

About UAB: We are consistently one of the top 25 NIH funded research institutions in the U.S. and with faculty from over 30 departments across campus there are many opportunities for you in new and exciting areas of biomedical research. And, UAB is a leader in innovative technology such as whole genome sequencing, electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, crystallography, flow cytometry, drug discovery and others.

Contact Us: We are always searching for the brightest and most dedicated students to join our highly competitive CMDB theme and experience firsthand our cutting edge science. This is your personal invitation to explore the many possible opportunities offered by CMDB at UAB. Please explore this web site and apply today!
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  • Researchers will seek molecular answers to how exercise delivers benefits and compete for a UAB center.This summer, the NIH Common Fund announced a five-year, $170 million effort to reveal — in molecular terms — how exercise delivers its many benefits throughout the body. Marcas Bamman, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham was one of the key investigators who helped NIH staff do the research for their successful application to the Common Fund. Now UAB will compete to help lead the research program after Requests for Applications are released in September, says Bamman, a professor of cell, developmental and integrative biology and director of the UAB Center for Exercise Medicine. This new Common Fund, “Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity in Humans,” targets a huge gap in understanding. While it is clear that exercise, or physical activity (PA), improves health outcomes and prevents disease — benefits that include better musculoskeletal function during...

  • A growing number of researchers, from computer scientists to philosophers, are taking an interest in the "artificial artificial intelligence" offered by Amazon's microwork platform.Written by Matt WindsorThis spring, Chris Callison-Burch, Ph.D., was in town to share an unusual approach to machine learning. This is one of the hottest topics in computer science: It is behind everything from Google’s self-driving cars to Apple’s Siri personal assistant. Callison-Burch, an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania, is building a system that can automatically translate foreign languages into English — especially obscure dialects (from an American point of view) that can be of great interest to national security. He was in Birmingham at the invitation of Steven Bethard, Ph.D., a machine learning researcher and assistant professor in the UAB College of Arts and Sciences Department of Computer and Information Sciences. In order to teach a computer to do something, Callison-Burch explained, you need to give it examples....

  • This renewing of UAB’s prestigious Center for Translational Science Award will bolster research and workforce development at UAB and throughout its regional partner network in the Southeast.Written by Christina CroweThe National Institutes of Health has awarded the University of Alabama at Birmingham Center for Clinical and Translational Science $33.59 million over four years to continue the center’s programs advancing translational research. Since its initial funding in 2008 through Alabama’s only Center for Translational Science Award to work toward innovative discoveries for better health, the UAB CCTS has nurtured UAB research, accelerating the process of translating laboratory discoveries into treatments for patients, training a new generation of clinical and translational researchers, and engaging communities in clinical research efforts. The CCTS will continue to advance its mission to accelerate the delivery of new drugs, methodologies and practices to patients at UAB and throughout a partner network of 11 institutions in the Southeast. “We are excited...

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