Student Spotlight

Gunn_Gwen_Gisiner

Gwen Gunn

Project Title: Assessing novel suppression and combination therapies for the treatment of MPS I-H
Mentor:
David Bedwell, PhD
Department: Microbiology
Undergrad: BS, University of Maryland, College Park

Welcome to the Cell, Molecular, and Developmental Biology (CMDB) PhD Theme, a part of the Graduate Biomedical Sciences program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine. The CMDB theme is designed to provide maximum flexibility that results in students who are prepared to launch into a career in the emerging biomedical science field. Our graduates have exciting careers in scientific research in both academic and industrial settings; scientific-related writing, business, law, bioterrorism, forensics, administration, and education. 

About Us: CMDB is a cross-disciplinary theme at a leading research University in the sunny south, consisting of a diverse group of scientists and physicians who have a collective interest in fundamental processes in cell, molecular, and developmental biology and how alterations in these processes result inhuman diseases and birth defects.

About UAB: We are consistently one of the top 25 NIH funded research institutions in the U.S. and with faculty from over 30 departments across campus there are many opportunities for you in new and exciting areas of biomedical research. And, UAB is a leader in innovative technology such as whole genome sequencing, electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, crystallography, flow cytometry, drug discovery and others.

Contact Us: We are always searching for the brightest and most dedicated students to join our highly competitive CMDB theme and experience firsthand our cutting edge science. This is your personal invitation to explore the many possible opportunities offered by CMDB at UAB. Please explore this web site and apply today!
No events found
GCalendar
  • The importance of preventing hypertension is reinforced by a study showing anti-hypertension medicines can increase stroke risk by 248 percent, according to new UAB School of Public Health research published in the journal Stroke.Untreated high blood pressure, or hypertension, wreaks havoc on the body, leading to heart disease and stroke. New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham published in the journal Stroke shows that, although HBP medications are beneficial, it is as risky to wait for the condition to develop and then treat it to a controlled level. A cohort of 26,785 black and white participants ages 45-plus from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study were followed for 6.3 years by a research team led by George Howard, Dr.P.H., a professor in the Department of Biostatistics in the UAB School of Public Health. At baseline, 12,327 participants were successfully treated hypertensives, meaning their HBP treatment...

  • A new study from UAB suggests that the effect of genetic variants on warfarin dose differs by race – a step towards personalized medicine.Nita Limdi, Ph.D., Pharm.D., UAB professor of neurologyA new report from researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham demonstrates that clinical and genetic factors affecting dose requirements for warfarin vary by race. The study, published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology, proposes race-specific equations to help clinicians better calculate warfarin dosage.   Warfarin is the most widely used blood thinning medication, or anticoagulant, prescribed to prevent stroke and to treat blood clots. Determining the optimal warfarin dose to prevent clots while avoiding dangerous bleeding is difficult. To ensure that a safe balance is achieved, patients taking warfarin must regularly visit their doctor for blood tests. Investigators have identified several factors that affect how the body breaks down warfarin and that consequently influence dose...

  • UAB researchers find a chemical pathway — a glutamate transporter — that may be causing seizures and shorten survival rates for patients with brain tumors.Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have identified a chemical pathway that may be associated with seizures and shorter patient survival in some patients with malignant glioma, the most common and deadly form of brain tumor. In findings published May 27 in Science Translational Medicine, the researchers suggest that a transporter known as SXC is responsible for boosting levels of glutamate in the brains of some glioma patients. System x­c-(SXC) expression in human glioma cells growing in vitro. The catalytic subunitof SXC, SLC7A11/xCT (green) is highly expressed in approximately half of gliomas. The cell structure (red) and nuclei (blue) show the morphology of these glioma cells. Confocal image by Stephanie Robert and Ian Kimbrough.Glutamate is a vital neurotransmitter in the brain; but increased expression of...

Epi Menu