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Education: Curriculum and Instruction

*Applicants to the Alternative Master’s (5th Year) programs are no longer required to submit GRE or MAT scores. The Praxis II and the AECTP are now required. Please direct questions to the School of Education at (205) 934-7530.  

View PDF of Education (Curriculum and Instruction) Admissions Checklist

View PDF of the Alternative (5th Year) Master’s in Early Childhood and Elementary Education (P-6)

View PDF of Collaborative Special Education Program: Autism Spectrum Disorders Admissions Checklist

View PDF of English as a Second Language Admissions Checklist

View PDF of Reading Admissions Checklist

View PDF of School Psychometry Admissions Checklist

View PDF of Special Education Master's Degree Admissions Checklist

View PDF of Teacher Leader Admissions Checklist

View PDF version of the Education-Curriculum and Instruction catalog description

Chair:

Dr. Lynn Kirkland

Phone:

(205) 934-8358

E-mail:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Web site:

http://www.uab.edu/education/ci/

Degrees offered:
Education, Early Childhood (Ph.D., Ed.S., M.A.Ed.)
Education, Elementary (Ed.S., M.A.Ed.)
Education, High School (Ed.S., M.A.Ed.)
Art Education (M.A.Ed.)
Music Education (M.A.Ed.)
English as a Second Language (M.A.Ed.)
Reading (M.A.Ed.)

Faculty

Carol Allison, Instructor (Special Education); Visual Impairments 

Joseph C. Burns, Associate Professor (Elementary and High School Education); Biology, Science Education

Charles Calhoun, Associate Professor (Elementary Education); Elementary Math Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Lois M. Christensen, Professor (Elementary Education); Elementary Social Studies, Qualitative Research Methodology, Elementary Preservice Teacher Education, Ethnographic Processes, Study of Diversity, Women, and International Topics

Jeremiah Clabough, Assistant Professor, (Secondary Education) Social Sciences

Karen Dahle, Associate Professor (Special Education); Special Education Administration and Supervision, School Psychology, Autism, Counseling

Ann Dominick, Assistant Professor (Early Childhood Education)

Kay Emfinger, Associate Professor (Early Childhood Education); Early Childhood Development, Curriculum Development, Curriculum Theory

James Ernest, Associate Professor (Early Childhood Education); Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education

Debbie Fly, Instructor (Elementary Education)

Richard M. Gargiulo, Professor (Special Education); Conceptual Development of Mild Disabilities, Teacher Education

Renitta Goldman, Professor (Special Education); Learning and Behavioral Handicaps; Assessment; Physical, Emotional and Sexual Abuse; Suicide Among Minority Populations

Grace Jepkemboi-Kibirgen, Assistant Professor (Early Childhood Education) Early Childhood Development, Early Childhood Curriculum

Constance Kamii, Professor (Early Childhood Education); Early Childhood Education and Theory of Jean Piaget

Jennifer Kilgo, Professor (Special Education); Early Childhood

Lynn Kirkland, Professor (Early Childhood Education); Early Childhood Development, Early Childhood Curriculum

Maryann M. Manning, Professor Emerita (Elementary Education); Reading and Language Arts, Individualization of Instruction, Creative Teaching

Kathleen Martin, Associate Professor Emerita (Early Childhood Education); Reading, Child Development, Reading Recovery

Lee Meadows, Associate Professor (High School Education); Science Education, Multicultural Issues, K-14 Science

Betty Nelson, Associate Professor (Special Education); Low-Incidence and High-Incidence Disabilities, Assistive Technology, Collaboration in Schools

Sherry Parrish, Assistant Professor, (Elementary Education)

Tonya Perry, Assistant Professor (Secondary Education); Language Arts Education

Diane Pevsner, Assistant Professor (Collaborative Teacher)

David Radford, Associate Professor (Science Education); Assessment, Professional Development

Mary Jean Sanspree, Research Professor (Special Education); Visual Impairments, Alabama Deaf-Blind Project

Katherine Scott, Instructor, (Elementary Education)

Linda Searby, Associate Professor (Leadership); Mentoring

Seay, Susan, Assistant Professor (ESL) Second Language Acquisition

Kristi Shaw-Saleh, Assistant Professor (ESL) Second Language Acquisition, ESL methods for teaching adult learners

Michele Sims, Associate Professor (High School Education); Reading, Middle School Education

Tommy G. Smith, Associate Professor (High School Education); Mathematics Education

Susan Spezzini, Assistant Professor (English Language Learner Education); Phonology for ESL Teachers, Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Instruction

Deborah Strevy, Assistant Professor (Early Childhood Education); Language Arts, Early Childhood Education

Jennifer Summerlin, Instructor, (Reading Education)

Deborah Voltz, Associate Professor (Special Education); Learning Disabilities, Urban Education

Yu-Mei Wang, Associate Professor (Technology); Technology Across Curriculum, E-teaching, Instructional Design

Lou Anne Worthington, Associate Professor (Special Education); Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, Collaborative TEaching, Special Education Law

Veronique Zimmerman-Brown, Instructor

Program Contact Information:

Program

Coordinator

Room

Phone Number

Secondary Education

Dr. Susan Spezzini

120

(205) 934-8357

English as a Second Language

Dr. Susan Spezzini

120

(205) 934-8357

Special Education

Dr. Kay Emfinger

107

(205) 934-7003

All other programs

Dr. Kay Emfinger

107

(205) 934-7003

Graduate Programs

The M.A.Ed., Ed.S., and Class AA programs emphasize improving the teaching skills of the student and broadening the student's understanding of the field(s) of teaching specialization. Numerous teaching fields are available. All prospective students must apply for admission through the Graduate School.

The M.A.Ed. program requires a minimum of 30-32  semester hours of study, and the Ed.S. and AA programs require at least an additional 32 semester hours. All programs require a written final examination or comprehensive electronic portfolio and a minimum GPA of 3.00 for master’s degree and 3.25 for the Ed.S. An outline of the specific course requirements can be obtained from the office of the graduate program director or the Office of Student Services in the School of Education. The M.A.Ed. programs satisfy the academic requirements for the Alabama State Department of Education Class A Professional Certificate. The Ed.S. programs satisfy academic requirements for the State Department of Education Class AA Professional Certificate and an Ed.S. degree. See also the section "Education (General Information)" earlier in this catalog.

The program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in early childhood education is sufficiently flexible to accommodate the interests and previous preparation of the student, but it must include an internship and a substantial research component culminating in the completion of a dissertation. The minimum admission requirements are those of the UAB Graduate School. However, admission is highly selective, and most successful applicants have qualifications much higher than the minimum. Admission is open with ongoing application considerations. Application packets must be complete in the Graduate School office before the applicant can be considered for the program.

Contact Information

For detailed information, contact Dr. Kay Emfinger (Early Childhood, Elementary, Special Education), or, Dr. Susan Spezzini (Secondary, Single Subject K-12 and English as a Second Language).  
UAB Department of Curriculum and Instruction, EB 119, 1530 3rd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294-1250.

Telephone 205-934-5371

Web http://www.uab.edu/education/ci/

Course Descriptions

 Unless otherwise noted, all courses are for 3 semester hours of credit. Course numbers preceded with an asterisk indicate courses that can be repeated for credit, with stated stipulations.

Early Childhood Education (ECE)

545. Curriculum for Young Children. Basic knowledge of curriculum and concepts of mathematics, science, and social studies for young children. Child growth and development as basis for planning and teaching mathematics, science, and social studies to young children. Teaching methods and use of instructional media. Practicum experience required. Prerequisite: Admission to ECE 5th-Year Program. 6 hours.

546. Communication Arts and Reading for the Young Child. Nature of reading and language arts experiences for children, infant through grade three. Media, materials, experiences, programs, and strategies to facilitate development of communicative abilities with emphasis on preserving and maintaining creative expression in different cultural settings. Integration of learning in areas of listening, speaking, reading, composition, literature, handwriting, spelling, and other communicative arts. Laboratory experiences required. Prerequisite: Admission to ECE 5th-Year Program. 6 hours.

548. Infant/Toddler Development. Study of human development within an ecological context from before birth to three years of age. Course covers social-emotional, physical, cognitive, language, and creative development of the infant and toddler in the home and also in programs for very young children.

549. Educational Environment: Infants/Parents (Toddlers/Parents). Study of infant (or toddler) development as it relates to the organization of a parent/infant (or toddler) educational program. Information concerning program management, observation of parent/infant (or toddler) interaction, development and sequencing of activities, creation and evaluation of materials, and an examination of techniques and procedures for parent involvement and education. Actual experience in working with a parent/infant (or toddler) program will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: ECE 548 or equivalent. 3 or 6 hours.

620. Introduction to Curriculum and Teaching. Basic knowledge of early childhood curriculum for programs, infant through third grade, in a variety of settings. Relationship of child growth and development in planning and implementation of all areas of curriculum. Prerequisite: Admission to ECE 5th-Year Program.

630. Cognitive Curriculum in Early Childhood Education. Mathematics and science for children four to eight years of age based on constructivism. Children's thinking, particularly in physical-knowledge activities, group games, and situations in daily living.

631. Program for Young Children. Early childhood education programs and theoretical perspectives. Existing curricula such as Piaget, behavior modification, Montessori, open classroom, foreign-based programs. Required for students without undergraduate majors in ECE.

632. Young Children and Their Literature. Literature for children in nursery school, kindergarten, primary grades; selection, use, and integration of literature in total curriculum.

633. Social Development of the Young Atypical Child. Theoretical issues and political, sociological relationship of the atypical child. Nature, assessment, and intervention of emotional disorder. Program planning, teaching, and interdisciplinary considerations.

690. Practicum in Early Childhood Education. Required of all M.A.Ed. students. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 or 6 hours.

692. Practicum in Primary Education. Prerequisite: Permission of advisor and department. 6 or 9 hours.

693. Internship in Early Childhood Education. Full-time internship for 10 weeks (300 clock hours). 3 or 9 hours.

694. Practicum in Early Childhood Education for the Young Atypical Child.

730.  Doctoral Seminar I: Advanced Developmental Theory. Prerequisites: Admission to doctoral program or instructor permission.

731.  Doctoral Seminar II: Current Issues with Children in Society. Prerequisites: Admission to doctoral program or instructor permission.

732.  Doctoral Seminar III: History of ECE. Prerequisites: Admission to doctoral program or instructor permission.

733. Doctoral Seminar IV. Advanced Research in Early Childhood Education. Evaluation and planning of research in preparation for dissertation. Prerequisite: At least one course in research, measurement, or statistics. 3-9 hours.

734. Logic and Scientific Inquiry. Scientific investigation as applied in education. Conceptual issues in research process. Methods of analysis and presentation. Prerequisite: Master's degree.

735. Meaning and Development of Play. Nature of play, its importance and how it is nurtured. Prerequisite:

736. Personality Development of the Young Child. Theoretical perspectives; review of research, including cross-cultural studies.

737. Parent, Child, School Interface. Historical development of parent involvement. Theoretical bases of family-school interactions.  

738. Consultation and Coaching Processes and the Young Child. ; Skills for working with families, teachers, and professionals in community agencies that serve infants, toddlers, and young children.

739. Developing Interpersonal Competence for Leaders. Relationships with coworkers and subordinates. Various approaches to interpersonal relationships.

740. Research Apprenticeship. Planning, implementation, analysis, and presentation of research.  3 or 6 hours.

741. Research Study: Design and Implementation. Development of rationale, literature search, collection and analysis of data, and formal written report (according to APA guidelines). Must be completed before admission to candidacy.

742-745. Piaget: Theory and Research. Jean Piaget's theory, application to early childhood education; physical and social (conventional) knowledge. Representation and memory, logico-mathematical knowledge. Prerequisite: Master's degree and  EEC 672.

746. Contemporary Issues in American Science Education. Crisis atmosphere surrounding science education in American classroom.

747. Social Development of Young Children. Factors influencing socialization of young children.

748. Research in Infancy. Theoretical and empirical evidence relating to psychomotor domain.

749. Advanced Early Childhood Curriculum. Historical, philosophical, psychological, and social thought influencing curriculum in early childhood education.

750. Literacy Before School. Written language development of preschool children.

751. Schooling and Literacy Instruction. Primary-level literacy instruction and children's literacy development.

752. Theory and Research on Literacy Development and Instruction. Philosophical and psychological beliefs regarding literacy development.

753. John Dewey and the Early Childhood Curriculum. Dewey's philosophy, epistemology; relationship to early childhood education and development.

760. Current Issues in Infant, Toddler, and Early Childhood Education. 3 hours.

774. Advanced Seminar in Language Development. Relationship of thinking and knowing to language development; strategies for analysis; strengths and weaknesses of techniques of examining language development.

790. Internship in Early Childhood Education and Development. 6 or 9 hours.

791. Field Studies in Early Childhood Education. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-6 hours.

792. Directed Readings in Research. Review of research in early childhood education to gain understanding of conceptual and methodological basis.

793. Individual Research in Early Childhood Education. Recent research in early childhood education; systematic solutions to problems in education.

794. Current Research Topics in Early Childhood Education. 1-3 hours. Philosophical aspects of scientific methods in education; functions of paradigms, theories, and models in inquiry; theory development and validation; major types of experimental and nonexperimental inquiry appropriate to study of educational phenomena.

798. Nondissertation Research. 3-12 hours.

799. Dissertation Research. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy. 3-12 hours.

Arts Education (EDA)

 583. Methods of Teaching Art. Learning experiences necessary for development of essential teaching competencies. Prerequisite: Admission to 5th-Year Program. 3 or 6 hours.

584. Methods of Teaching Art Laboratory. Required. 1 or 2 hours.

591. Art Education Final Exhibition. M.A. students plan and mount exhibition of work during final year. Graphic design students may prepare public portfolio presentation instead of exhibition. Art History students prepare a thesis research paper. Should be taken with the student's thesis advisor. Prerequisite: Permission of advisor.

651. Innovative Practices in Teaching Art in the Schools. Innovative practices in planning, instructing, and evaluating in art education. Specialized study of contemporary needs in art and art education.

680. Art Experiences in the Teaching of Art N-12. Concepts, methods, and skills for teaching art.

690. Internship in Art Education N-12. For 5th-Year Program students. Observation and student teaching in elementary and secondary schools (10 weeks or 300 clock hours). Prerequisites: Unconditional acceptance into the 5th-Year Program, completion of 9 hours in professional studies, EDA 680, and completion of 9 hours in academic courses. 9 hours.

Curriculum (EDC)

651. Innovative Practices in Curriculum. Current issues and special topics in curriculum; topics vary. May be repeated with different subject areas.

655. Curriculum Principles and Practices. Current curriculum practices; concepts and principles underlying their development.

656. Developmental Problems and Issues in Curriculum Construction. Includes field study of curriculum in teachers' own schools.

694. Curriculum Seminar: Special Problems in Curriculum Development. Prerequisite: EDC 655 or permission of instructor. 1-3 hours.

706. The Dynamics of Educational Change. Defining roles as change agents; understanding school as unit undergoing change; guiding perspectives in making changes. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate school.

707. Introduction to Teacher Leadership. Prerequisites: Master's degree and EDC 655.

711. Analysis and Evaluation of Teaching. Strategies and models for analysis of teaching. Use of data in evaluating teacher effectiveness. Prerequisite: Master's degree.

712. Seminar in Curriculum and Instruction. Critical issues and research. Development and discussion of individual research. Prerequisite: Master's degree.

713. Educational Issues and Human Diversity. Social, economic, and cultural forces contributing to deprivation; implications for teachers, administrators, and educational staff. Prerequisite: Master's degree.

720. Problems and Issues in Education. Exploration of problems and issues associated with education. Emphasis on needs of teachers and implications of the current problems and issues. Prerequisite: Master's degree.

725. Advanced Study in Social Studies Curriculum. Major problems and issues associated with social studies curriculum and instructional practices. Prerequisites: Completion of graduate course in teaching social studies and experience in teaching social studies.

728. Ed.S. Research Project I. Development of research proposal. Proposal must be accepted and approved by appointed faculty committee. Prerequisites: EPR 692 or equivalent, EPR 596 or EPR 608, and 12 hours in Ed.S. program.

729. Ed.S. Research Project II. Prerequisites: EPR 692, EDC 728, EPR 596 or EPR 608, and 12 hours in Ed.S. program.

731. Curricular Design & Implementation.  Recognizing, assessing, and supporting quality instructional practices; program evaluation.  School-based problem research project and field experience.  3-5 hours.

732. Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Instruction.  Effective instruction and strategies for CLD students; outreach to CLD families.  School-based problem research project and field experience.  3-5 hours.

Reading (EDR)

540. Developmental Reading I. Materials and methods. Emphasis on planning balanced program and understanding reading process. Includes field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to 5th-Year Program. 4 hours.

541. Literature for Adolescents. Literary works written for or about adolescents.

543. Developmental Reading II: Focus on Content Areas. Reading process as it relates to content area materials. Includes field experience. Prerequisite: Admission to 5th-Year Program.  4 hours.

551. Reading in Content Areas. Reading process; evaluation of content area materials; analysis of different content area textbooks; meeting individual differences.

640. Reading Improvement Workshop. For inservice teachers of reading. Specific content varies according to needs of teachers. 3 or 6 hours.

650. Teaching Reading. Understanding of reading process. Nature of reading programs; readiness motivation, methods, skills, assessment, evaluation, materials, and resources.

652. Pre- and Early-Reading Instruction. Theoretical bases, procedures, techniques, and materials for prereading and reading instruction. Prerequisite: Developmental reading course.

653. Literature for Elementary and Middle Schools. Emphasis on needs of children, selection of books, societal issues in children's literature.

654. Assessment, Evaluation, and Correction of Reading Difficulties. Observation, standardized oral and written reading tests, and informal reading inventories. Selecting learning activities based on diagnostic data. Prerequisite: Special Education majors only.

655. Reading Assessment and Evaluation. Examines evaluation techniques, such as observations, and standardized oral and silent reading tests, and informal reading inventories, such as miscue analysis.

656. Reading Strategies for Students with Reading Difficulties. Development and application strategies for remediating reading problems based on assessment data. Prerequisite: Diagnostic reading course.

657. Supervision of Reading. Supervisor's role in improving reading instruction; methods of supervision and evaluation. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

659. Research and Problems in Reading. For teachers in elementary and early childhood education.

690. Internship in Remedial Reading. Supervised experience with children with reading difficulties. Prerequisites: Admission to reading certification program, permission of instructor and department, and EDR 654.

691. Practicum in Reading. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

692. Internship in Supervision of Reading. Prerequisites: Admission to Reading Supervisor Program, EDR 654 and 657, and permission of instructor. 6 hours.

698. Independent Nonthesis Research in Reading. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

701. Advanced Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Problems. Examination of serious reading disabilities; diagnosis, possible remediation strategies, and development; diagnosis, possible remediation strategies, and development of remediation plan in lab setting. Prerequisites: Master's degree and M.A.-level diagnostic reading course or permission of instructor.

702. Reading: Theoretical Foundations. Relates concepts of learning, development, and linguistics to reading-learning process; emphasis on current theory; implications for program planning and classroom practice. Prerequisites: EDR 650 or permission of instructor, and master's degree.

703. Advanced Research in Reading. Prerequisites: EDR 650 and master's degree.

704. Field Experiences in Reading. Supervised field experiences under direction of qualified reading consultant or supervisor in school setting. Prerequisites: Admission to Sixth-Year Program for Reading Teacher and permission of instructor. 3 or 6 hours.

705. Seminar in Reading Instruction. Examination of trends and issues in field of reading. topics determined by each class. Prerequisites: Master's degree and 9 graduate hours in reading or permission of instructor.

706. Research. Prerequisites: Master's degree and permission of instructor. 1-3 hours.

Elementary and Early Childhood Education (EEC)

500. Pedagogy One. Develops candidate's knowledge, skills/performance, and dispositions in the teaching of reading and language arts in the early childhood and elementary classroom. Refines abilities in instructional planning, instructional delivery, classroom management, and assessment of learners in order to address the literacy needs of diverse learners. 9 hours.

501. Pedagogy Two. Curriculum and field experience of P-6 curriculum in the areas of math, science, literacy, and social studies. Emphasis is placed on the scope, sequence, and content of each content area. Extensive field experiences required. 9 hours.

502. Primary Math Methods. Materials and methods on emergent numeracy. Field experience required. Prerequisites: Admission to 5th year program.  4 hours.

505. Children's Literature in Elementary & Early Childhood Education. Materials and methods. Needs of children, selection of books, societal issues in children's literature, and role of media in children's literature. Field experience required. Prerequisites: Admission to 5th-Year Program, EEC 600, EEC 610, EEC 660.

506. Language Arts in Elementary & Early Childhood Education. Materials and methods. Communication-based approach in developing effective language arts program. All aspects of language arts program addressed. Field experiencees required. Prerequisites: Admission to 5th-Year Program, EEC 600, EEC 610, EEC 660.  4 hours.

512. Mathematics in Elementary & Early Childhood Education. Material and methods of teaching mathematics. Emphasizes scope, sequence, and content of the mathematics program. Computation skills and problem solving are stressed. Includes field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to 5th-Year Program, EEC 505, EEC 506, EEC 515.  4 hours.

513. Science in Elementary & Early Childhood Education. Scope, sequence, materials, and methods. Emphasis on teaching and the development of content and process skills. Field experiences completed in conjunction with practicum. Prerequisite: Admission to 5th-Year Program.  4 hours.

514. Social Studies in Elementary & Early Childhood Education. Scope, sequence, and content of elementary school social studies curriculum. Teaching strategies, program articulation, and instructional planning. Field experiences completed in conjunction with practicum. Prerequisite: Admission to 5th-Year Program.  4 hours.

515. Learning Environments. Theoretical approaches that focus on child-centered curriculum, classroom management, discipline strategies, and cultural, linguistic, and developmentally appropriate instruction. Prerequisites: Admission to 5th-Year Program, EEC 600, EEC 610, EEC 660.

540. Advanced Workshop in Education. May be repeated for total of 9 hours with various topics. 1-3 hours.

560. Current Issues in Education. Topics announced in class schedule. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours with different topics. 1-3 hours.

565. Teaching Globe and Map Skills. Concepts and skills related to understanding functional use of globes and maps. Teaching strategies and methodologies for teaching concepts and skills. Curriculum scope, sequence, continuity, and application within social studies program.

673. Teaching in a Multicultural Society. Implications of cultural pluralism for teaching, student learning, curriculum planning, and instructional techniques.  (Please place this in the correct numerical order.

592. Individual Curriculum Projects: (Area Specified). Field projects in curriculum modification and improvement of classroom practice. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 or 6 hours.

593. Individual Readings. Individualized readings on special topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-3 hours.

594. Field Work in Elementary and Early Childhood Education. Observation and participation experiences with children. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1, 2, 3, or 6 hours.

600. Transition into P-6 Teaching. Introduction to the teaching profession (Alternative Fifth-Year Program, Elementary/Early Childhood Education). 3 hours

610. Curriculum Development in Elementary and Early Childhood Education. Curriculum decisions, planning and implementation.

611. Teacher Roles in Elementary and Early Childhood Education. Models of instructional roles such as facilitator, program planner, curriculum designer; models of social roles. Includes practicum experiences.

612. Models of Teaching. Selecting and applying specific teaching strategies. Includes practicum experiences.

620. Teaching Mathematics N-6. Issues and approaches in early childhood and elementary mathematics; research and implementation for instruction.

621. Teaching Language Arts P-12 . Issues and approaches in teaching early childhood and elementary school language arts. Implications of research for instruction.

622. Teaching Social Studies N-6. Function and organization of social studies programs in early childhood and elementary schools. Selection and adaptation of content, resources, teaching materials, and teaching strategies and methods with emphasis on current trends.

623. Teaching Science N-6. Issues and approaches in early childhood and elementary science. Implications of research for instruction.

625. Critical Theory in P-6 Education. Encompasses current issues in education from critical, postmodern, and feminist perspectives. Issues of equity, social justice, racism, sexism, and the marginalization of minorities in education will be explored. Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate School and EEC 660, Readings in Teaching and Learning. 3 hours.

628. Master's Project. Designed for the nontraditional 5th-year student in early childhood and elementary education. This one-hour seminar must be taken concurrently with the student's internship experience. 1 hour.

632. Advanced Children's Literature. Designed to explore literature for preschool, kindergarten, and primary- and intermediate-level children. Selection, use, and integration of literature throughout the total curriculum is stressed. Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate School or permission of the instructor. 3 hours.

650. Systematic Reflections About Teaching. Theory and practice of reflective inquiry in the elementary classroom which includes observations, data collection, analysis, and narrative reporting. Prerequisite: Admission into Graduate School. 3 hours.

660. Reading in Teaching and Learning   An introductory course is designed to assist the student in locating, analyzing, and synthesizing current research in early childhood and elementary education. 3 hours.

670. Studying the Child in School. Analysis of child study in school; values and limitations of assessment.

671. Creative and Affective Experiences. Nature and nurture of creativity through creative learning experiences. Maintaining and preserving creative expression throughout curriculum.

672. Piaget and Perspectives in Learning. Piaget's theory of intellectual or cognitive development; applications to elementary and early childhood education. Prerequisite: Course in human growth and development.

674. Language Development. Developmental processes involved in language, relationship to education programs.

675. Teaching in the Urban School. Methods and materials; evaluation of school and school-related programs for equalizing educational opportunity.

676. Discipline and Social Education. Child growth and development as the basis for sound discipline in elementary school.

677. Readiness for Learning. Preschool and primary level language development and literacy development; assessment techniques.

678. Primary Math: A Constructivist Approach. New ways of teaching primary math based on Piaget's theory about how children acquire logico-mathematical knowledge.

680. National Board Portfolio. Prepares teachers for National Board Candidacy and to support candidates as they go through the certification process. Students enrolled in this course may be either precandidates or candidates for National Board Certification. Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate School and permission of candidate's advisor and course instructor. 6 hours.

690. Internship in P-3/3-6. Supervised teaching in an early childhood (P-3) and an elementary (3-6) program. The student gradually assumes responsibility for planning and teaching for the entire class (minimum of 12 weeks). The internship experience includes supervision in working with professional resource professionals and parents. Prerequisites: Approval of application for Internship in P-3/3-6. 9 hours.

691. Practicum in ECE/ELE. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 hours.

692. Individual Curriculum Projects: (Area Specified). Field projects in curriculum modifications and improvement of classroom practice. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 or 6 hours.

693. Independent Study. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-3 hours.

694. Field Study. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1, 2, 3, or 6 hours.

695. Practicum Supervision in ECE/ELE. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or advisor. 2 hours.

696. Internship Seminar. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EEC 690. 2 hours.

698. Independent Nonthesis Research. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

699. Thesis Research. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy and permission of instructor. 6 or 9 hours.

701. Advanced Seminar in Language Development. Relationship of thinking and knowing to language development; strategies for analysis. Prerequisites: EEC 674 or equivalent and master's degree.

702. Administration and Supervision of Programs for Young Children. Evaluation, decision making, supportive services, staff development, community interaction strategies. Prerequisite: Master's degree.

710. Research. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-3 hours.

English as a Second Language (EESL)

610. Second Language Acquisition. An in-depth look at major theories of second language acquisition. Exploration of learning environments, programs, home language, culture, and other factors that influence second language acquisition. 3 hours.

613. Teaching ESL in a Multicultural Society. Designed to introduce students to the goals, principles, and practices of multicultural education and to sensitize students to cultural pluralism in the United States. 3 hours.

615. Grammar for ESL Teachers. A critical study of aspects of Modern English grammar important for the teaching of English as a Second or Foreign Language. Students will gain an understanding of the major syntactic and semantic phenomena important for teaching ESL/EFL, become familiar with the practical and theoretical literature on teaching English grammar, participate in practical exercises of grammar correction in writing with actual ESL students, and develop and compile classroom activities for teaching points of grammar. 3 hours.

617. Teaching English in a Global Context. Provides a sociolinguistic perspective on the globalization of English and on the emergence and teaching of English as an International Language. Students explore dialectology, language change, language diversity, language ideology and power, national language policies, World Englishes, the growing number of non-native English speakers, and attitudes of native and non-native English speakers toward the domination of English. 3 hours.

620. Special Topics in ESL. Overview of institutional structures that support new language learners, curriculum and teaching accommodations supported by second language acquisition theory, support networks, and legal issues. (Recent topics: K-12 Equal Access) Prerequisite: EESL 610. 3 hours.

625. Phonology for ESL teachers.  An introduction to phonology and its application to the teaching of English as a second or foreign language. Students learn the phonological structure of the English language, analyze examples from language learner data, diagnose pronunciation difficulties experienced by English language learners (ELLs) from different first languages, and identify instructional strategies for assisting ELLs to perceive and produce challenging English sounds. 3 hours.

627. Teaching Adult Language Learners. Introduces goals, principles, and practices for teaching English to adult learners, addresses the influence of varying backgrounds on adult language learning, and examines ways to evaluate adults' second language development. After learning to recognize quality components in distinct program models, as outlined by TESOL Standards for Adult Education ESL Programs, students do a critical study of community-based programs and English for Specific Purposes. 3 hours.

630. Methods and Materials of Teaching ESL. Examines traditional and current approaches to teaching English to speakers of other languages and curriculum materials, texts, and other resources. Prerequisite: EESL 610. 3 hours.

637. Methods for Teaching English as an International Language. Prepares students to teach English as an International Language by using methods, strategies, and techniques appropriate for adults in ESL contexts and for all learners in EFL contexts. Engaged with approaches aligned with TESOL Standards for ESL/EFL Teachers of Adults, students plan state-of-the-art curriculum, instruction and assessment for 5 program settings: adult/community, workplace, college/university, intensive English, and English as a Foreign Language. 3 hours.

640. Teaching ESL through Reading and Writing. Theory, research and practice in reading and writing for second language learners. Implications for teaching reading and writing skills that allow second language learners to participate in the full range of academic situations. Prerequisite: EESL 610. 3 hours.

647. Instruction and Assessment: Reading and Writing. Addresses linguistic, sociocultural, psychological, and educational factors that affect literacy development of English as an additional language. Grounded in theoretical and practical aspects of teaching second language (L2) reading and writing to adolescents and adults in diverse communities, students learn to implement effective instructional strategies for promoting literacy in English as an additional language. To measure attainment of L2 reading and writing skills, students learn to design and conduct authentic assessments and to administer standardized assessments. Prerequisite: EESL 610. 3 hours.

650. Strategies for Teaching Math and Science to ELLs. Provides knowledge and strategies for making math and science accessible to ELLs at all grade levels, K-12. Classroom teachers will learn to make accommodations for teaching ELLs within a sheltered instruction framework. 3 hours.

657. Instruction and Assessment: Listening and Speaking. Examines how spoken communication is structured so that it is socially appropriate and linguistically accurate. Students learn principles and best practices for the contextualized teaching of second language (L2) listening and speaking skills to adolescent  and adult learners. After exploring the purposes, types, and availability of formal testing tools to assess the attainment of these skills in English as an additional language, students also learn to generate and conduct their own tests for assessing L2 listening and speaking. Prerequisite: EESL 610. 3 hours.

660. Research in ESL. Primary types of research conducted in second language teaching and learning and how these methods can be used to inform teaching. Introduction to classroom-based second language research approaches. 3 hours.

687. Practicum Seminar in Adult English Language Teaching. An inquiry-focused course that guides emerging teachers in experiencing the differentiated facets of working in adult ESL and EFL environments. Students explore issues related to Intensive English Programs, English for Occupational Purposes, Program Administration, and English as an International Language. Students observe classes in regional IEPs, develop an EOP program, receive hands-on experience in administration, apply research to various adult EIL teaching situations, and do an in-depth study of an EFL context. Prerequisite: EESL 610. 3 hours.

689. Internship Seminar in ESL. Provides an opportunity to explore in-depth effective ways to deliver instruction during the internship experience. It must be taken concurrently with EESL 690 (9). Approval of internship application. 1 hour.

690. Internship in ESL, N-12. Meets the internship requirements of the state code. Interns are engaged in the full scope of teaching activities including planning and delivering lessons, evaluating students, and conducting managerial tasks and other appropriate duties. Prerequisite: Approval of internship application. 3, 6, or 9 hours

697. ESL Practicum: Adult ELLs. A standards-based course offering practical application of the knowledge and skills learned in other courses for teaching ESL to adult language learners. After doing structured observations of professional ESL educators and participating in the corresponding debriefings, novice teachers engage in the full scope of ESL teaching activities. They plan and deliver lessons, evaluate learners and their language development, and conduct managerial tasks and other appropriate duties. Prerequisite: Approval of practicum application. 3 hours. 

Foreign Language (EFL)

 585. Teaching Strategies for Foreign Language, N-12. Approaches and methods of teaching and testing foreign language. Selection and use of audiovisual equipment and materials. Includes structured school observations. 6 hours.

598. Student Teaching in Foreign Languages, N-12. Supervised teaching in foreign languages (N-12). Prerequisite: Approval of application for student teaching. 9 hours.

691. N-12 Foreign Language Internship. Supervised foreign language teaching in elementary and secondary schools. Prerequisite: Approval of application for internship. 9 hours.

High School (EHS)

 556. Classroom Management in the Secondary Schools. Designed to help teachers build their own personal system of discipline, consonant with their philosophies and personalities as well as with realities of students and schools. Emphasis on successful classroom management techniques.

558. Science, Technology, and Society: A Primer for Education Majors. (Also EHS 458). Explores nature of momentous changes: origin, current status, and future direction. Emphasis on role of educational community in helping young people to better understand and deal with various issues raised.

565. Secondary School Curriculum: Mathematics. Preparation to teach secondary school mathematics: making informed decisions about curricula, learners, and methodology in mathematics. Acquainting students with current state and national reforms in mathematics education. Problem solving, computers and calculators, and manipulatives in teaching mathematics. Developmental levels and individual differences of learners. Includes field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to 5th-Year Program.

566. Secondary School Curriculum: Language Arts/English. A study of and practicum in the teaching of Language Arts and English in the secondary school; includes field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to 5th-Year Program.

567. Secondary School Curriculum: Science. Teaching methods and curricula in secondary science programs. Includes field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to 5th-Year Program.

568. Secondary School Curriculum: Social Studies. Understanding curriculum design and implementation as it relates to Social Studies in grades 7-12. Required demonstration of abilities to make informed decisions concerning what strategies to use with what students and how best to evaluate the students' progress in achieving the defined goals of a lesson. Includes field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to 5th-Year Program.

569. Secondary School Curriculum: Foreign Language. Approaches and methods of teaching and evaluating foreign language at all levels. Includes field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to 5th-Year Program.

570. Practicum in Secondary Education. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EHS 565, 566, 567, or 568. 1 hour.

571. Special Education, Accommodation and Modification Lab. Problems and issues in special education and the regular classroom. Concurrent enrollment in EHS 565, 566, 567, or 568. 1 hour.

597. Special Problems in Education. Seminar for seniors and graduate students; individualized readings and research projects based on student's special interests. May be repeated for total of 6 hours. 1-3 hours.

599. Field Studies in Selected Educational Settings. Field visits to locations of high educational impact, preceded by organized group meetings to develop background and concepts on which visits will be based; summation meetings follow visits. Individual projects and papers prescribed as appropriate. Credit determined by complexity of area or topic under study and necessary length of time rather than by distance involved. Cost for travel and other related arrangements to be announced for each study group. 1-3 hours.

600.  Secondary Education Curriculum and Methods I. Introductory course in 5th-Year (nontraditional) Alternative Masters Program for high school education. Developing basic teaching skills and understanding of interdependence among all levels within school and community. Course requires 35 hours of field experiences beyond class meetings. 3 hours

611. Advanced Special Methods for Teaching Foreign Languages. Instructional objectives, classroom learning activities, utilization of differential pedagogical activities, improved use of source materials, and material sources.

612. Teaching English, Grades 7-14. Curriculum and instruction in English programs. Issues, materials, and methods. Field experiences required. Prerequisite: Undergraduate Language Arts methods.

614. Teaching Social and Behavioral Sciences, Grades 7-14. Advanced course in methods and materials of teaching social and behavioral sciences in high school. General philosophy and purpose of social science disciplines. Field experiences required. Prerequisite: Undergraduate Social Science methods.

615. Methods of Teaching Science, Grades 7-14. Science teaching methods, classroom interaction, current research, process skills, science/society issues, and cognitive development of students. Field experiences required. Prerequisite: Undergraduate Science methods.

616. Teaching Mathematics in Secondary School. Philosophical and psychological principles applied to teaching math. Field experiences required. Prerequisite: Undergraduate Mathematics methods.

644. Workshop in Teaching (Selected Topics). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

645. Inquiry in the Social Studies. Inquiry and discovery techniques through use of simulation, games, role playing, and other group activities. Social studies projects, programs, and materials.

647. Secondary School Programs. Innovations, programs, and classroom practices; forces leading to recent trends.

650. Teaching the Emerging Adolescent. Curriculum, materials, and methods of instruction reflecting needs and characteristics of age group.

*651. Innovative Practices in Teaching in Secondary School (Area Studies). Innovative practices in planning, instructing, and evaluating high school area studies. May be repeated if taken in different areas of study.

653. Current Issues in Secondary Education. Critical problems affecting teacher and curriculum in grades 6-14.

681. Special Topics in Education. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-6 hours.

690. Internship Seminar in Secondary Education. Prerequisite: Current enrollment in EHS 691. 1 hour.

691. Secondary School Internship. Observation and teaching in secondary school (15 weeks minimum). Includes attendance at a weekly seminar on campus. Prerequisites: Unconditional acceptance in 5th-Year Program and approval of application for internship. 9 hours.

692. Field Studies in (Selected Educational Settings). 1-3 hours.

693. Advanced Field Experience.

695. Secondary School Internship for Speech Communication/Theater. Observation and teaching in secondary school (10 weeks or 300 clock hours minimum). Students also attend minimum of five 3-hour seminars designed to meet specific needs. Prerequisites: Unconditional acceptance in 5th-Year Program, completion of graduate methods course 9 hours in certification area, at least 9 hours in professional in addition to methods course, and approval of application for internship. 6 hours.

697. Individual Readings in Education. May be repeated for total of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Permission of advisor and instructor. 1-3 hours.

698. Individual Research in Education. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-6 hours.

699. Thesis Research. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy and permission of instructor. 6 or 9 hours.

710. Creative Teaching in Middle School. Advanced methods and materials for teaching grades 6-9.

720. Individual Research in Education. Prerequisites: Master's degree and permission of instructor.

Elementary (ELE)

620. Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School. Issues and approaches in elementary mathematics; research and implementation for instruction.

621. Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary School. Issues and approaches in teaching elementary school language arts. Implications of research for instruction.

622. Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School. Function and organization of social studies programs in elementary schools. Selection and adaptation of content, resources, teaching materials, and strategies and methods. Emphasis on current trends.

623. Teaching Science in the Elementary School. Issues and approaches in elementary science. Implications of research for instruction.

624. The Elementary School. Organizational patterns in American elementary schools.

690. Practicum in Elementary Education. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 or 6 hours.

691. Internship in Elementary Education. Full-time internship as elementary education teacher for 10 weeks (300 clock hours). Responsibility as teacher for at least 10 days. 3 or 9 hours.

721. Developing Effective Instruction in the Elementary School. Leadership role of senior teachers; analysis and enhancement of instructional programs; development of teaching staff. Prerequisite: Master's degree.

Middle School (EMS)

590. Middle School Internship. Observation and teaching in middle school (10 weeks or 300 hours minimum). Students will attend a minimum of five 3-hour seminars designed to meet specific needs. Prerequisites: Unconditional acceptance in the 5th-Year Program and completion of graduate methods course, 9 hours in academic work, and at least 9 hours in professional courses in addition to the methods course.

648. The Middle School. Curriculum and principles in middle school education. Development of middle school from early junior high school movement. Examination of middle school programs and activities.

649. Studies in Middle School Education I, II, III. Advanced workshops in various phases of middle school program. Phase I foundations (history, growth and development, philosophy); Phase II, curriculum; and Phase III, instruction. 1-3 hours.

698. Individual Research in Education. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-6 hours.

699. Thesis Research. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy and permission of instructor. 6 or 9 hours.

710. Creative Teaching in Middle School. Advanced methods and materials for teaching grades 6-9.

720. Individual Research in Education. Prerequisites: Master's degree and permission of instructor.

Music Education (EMU)

502. Methods of Teaching Music N-6. Teaching music in the elementary school environment. Investigation of critical elements in the teaching and learning process as related to music in grades N-6. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. 3 hours.

503. Methods of Teaching Music N-6 Laboratory. Provides public school observation experiences for music education students enrolled in EMU 502. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. 1 hour.

Educational Collaborative Teacher (ECT)   

601. Special Education Portfolio Process (1 credit hour). Provides students with the knowledge and skills to begin the process of designing a standards-based electronic portfolio. Students will address the issues regarding the content and construction of electronic portfolios and the purpose of each stage of development. Issues related to formatting options will be demonstrated and critiqued. Students will be required to develop and demonstrate the requisite skills for creating and filing critical information in a digital format. Students will review numerous portfolios for discussion. The focus will be a standards based product which each student will begin during this course.

650. Master's Seminar in Collaborative Teaching. A diagnostic and evaluation course designed to ensure that students have acquired basic competencies in historical, philosophical, legal, and assessment foundations in special education. Competencies addressed in this course also include research, writing, speaking, and computer literacy.

651. Assessment Foundations in Special Education. Designed to prepare special education teachers to assess children and youth in a manner that reflects federal and state mandates and regulations. Students are prepared to appropriately select, administer, and interpret assessment instruments designed to answer questions related to eligibility determination and, intervention programming.

652. Characteristics of Children and Youths with High-Incidence Disabilities. Details the characteristics, needs, and concerns related to children and youth with mild learning disabilities, mental retardation, and emotional-behavioral disorders. Additional issues addressed in the course are due process, inclusion, collaboration, and diversity as they pertain to these populations of students.

653. Characteristics of Children and Youth with Low-Incidence Disabilities. Details the characteristics, needs, and concerns related to children and youth with physical, health, sensory, and communication disabilities. Additional topics covered include positioning and handling, assessment, development of health care plans, and transdisciplinary collaboration.

654. Instructional and Assistive Technology. Identifying, designing, and implementing instructional and assistive technology devices and services. Topics covered include technologies for students with high- and low-incidence disabilities, general assistive technology adaptations, augmentative and alternative communication technologies, IEPs that incorporate assistive technology services and devices, and interagency collaboration.

655. Elementary Methods for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities. Provides students with knowledge and skill in instructional elementary content and methods. Issues related to designing, implementing, and evaluating instruction are presented. Additionally, the course provides critical information regarding the informal assessment of the teaching and learning processes. Specific methods for teaching reading, writing, mathematics, and study skills are covered.

656. Secondary Methods for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities. Provides students with knowledge and skill in secondary content and methods, including transition from school to adulthood. Issues related to designing, implementing, and evaluating instruction are presented. Additionally, this course provides critical information regarding the informal assessment of the teaching and learning processes. Specific methods for teaching reading, writing, mathematics, and study skills are covered.

657. Methods for K-12 Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities. Provides students with the knowledge and skills to teach learners with low-incidence disabilities in K-12 settings. Course content addresses issues related to positioning and handling, Alabama Extended Standards, IEP development, writing health care plans, assessment, and strategies for teaching reading, math, and writing.

658. Advanced IEP Program Development. Prepares students to utilize the general education curriculum as the foundation for educational programming for children and youth with special needs. IEP writing, using the general education curriculum, team planning, state- and district-wide assessments, and curriculum accommodations and modifications are topics addressed in this course.

659. Classroom Management. Prepares students to plan and manage the teaching and learning environment effectively. The major emphasis of the course is on the elements of classroom design and preparation. Primary and secondary academic and behavioral interventions are presented. Outcomes expected for students are related to the creation and maintenance of positive, caring classroom communities that facilitate the academic and social development of children and youth with disabilities.

660. Positive Behavior Supports. Prepares students to plan and manage the teaching and learning environment effectively. The major emphasis of the course is on the elements of classroom design and preparation. Primary and secondary academic and behavioral interventions are presented. Outcomes expected for students are related to the creation and maintenance of positive, caring classroom communities that facilitate the academic and social development of children and youth with disabilities.

661. Collaborative Partnerships. Provides an opportunity for students to develop the knowledge, skills, and ability to work collaboratively with professionals responsible for services provided to students with disabilities, their families, and their communities. Emphasis will be placed on blending general education, special education, and related services. The course consists of a series of topics and activities that are designed to provide an overview of collaboration and consultation, present issues related to diversity and inclusion, and highlight implications for special educators, general educators, related service personnel, students, the community, and families.

670. Practicum in Collaborative Teaching: Grades K-6. Students seeking Collaborative Teacher certification, Grades K-6, are required to complete a practicum experience in a collaborative setting that includes children who present a wide range of disabilities. This practicum experience is tailored to the unique needs and experiences of students seeking this certification.

671. Practicum in Collaborative Teaching: Grades 6-12. Students seeking Collaborative Teacher certification, Grades 6-12, are required to complete a practicum experience in a collaborative setting that includes children who present a wide range of disabilities. This practicum experience is tailored to the unique needs and experiences of students seeking this certification.

672. Internship in Collaborative Teaching: Grades K-6. Students in the 5th-year, nontraditional program are required to complete a 12-week internship that is to be divided between lower and upper elementary settings. This internship is designed to assist the prospective graduate in virtually all teaching responsibilities in collaborative settings.

673. Internship in Collaborative Teaching: Grades 6-12. Students in the 5th-year, nontraditional program are required to complete a 12-week internship that is to be divided between lower and upper secondary settings. This internship is designed to assist the prospective graduate in virtually all teaching responsibilities in collaborative settings.

674. Advanced Readings and Research in Special Education. Allows the student to pursue an in-depth investigation of current and timely issues in the field of special education. The instructor and student design an individual program of study during the course, based upon student needs and interests.

675. Survey of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Provides teachers with the knowledge and skills necessary to implement an optimal teaching-learning environment for students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder who represent diverse backgrounds in grades K-12.

676. Survey of Pervasive Developmental Disorders. An in-depth examination of the characteristics, needs, and other concerns of children and youth with pervasive developmental disorders. Topics also include interventions, collaboration, and functional life-skill programming.

677. Combating Child Abuse and Neglect. What constitutes child abuse? Perspectives will be offered from those affected by the tragedy of abuse, including victims, perpetrators, and the community at large: the family, educational, medical, political and legal systems. Intervention and prevention strategies will be stressed.

679. Advanced Topics in Special Education Law. Provides students with an in-depth examination of legal information pursuant to individuals with disabilities. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and its related amendments, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and Section 504 of the Improvement Rehabilitation Act are major federal laws reviewed in this course. Special education litigation is also addressed during the course.  

700. Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Introduction. Introductory course that focuses on characteristics of children and youth with autism spectrum disorders; trends and issues connected with autism spectrum disorders; and effective practices and strategies for structuring, managing, and promoting social skill development and social interactions between children and youth with autism spectrum disorders. 3 hours.

701. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Application of Assessment Information. Assessment-centered course that will guide the candidate in assessment, intervention, and programming for individuals within the autism spectrum. Candidates will learn to use formal and informal measures to identify student learning, language, sensory and regulatory needs, to design student-centered educational programming, write comprehensive evaluations, and select research based materials that match learner needs. 3 hours.

702. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Methods for Moderate to Severe Functioning. Methods course with special emphasis on low-functioning learners and individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Particular attention is given to effective practices and strategies for teaching and promoting functional and adaptive behavior that will enhance the learner's social responsibility and independent performance of daily activities. 3 hours.

703. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Methods for High Functioning Learners and Asperger's Syndrome. Methods course with special emphasis on learners with higher functioning autism spectrum disorders and Asperger Syndrome. Particular attention is given to effective practices and strategies for teaching and promoting social skill development and proactive social interactions. 3 hours.

704. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Collaboration and Consultation. Focuses on collaborative problem solving, consultation and related issues linked to educating students with autism spectrum disorders and related disabilities. 3 hours.   

705. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Seminars in Advanced Methods (2 credit hours). (20 clinical hours). To be taken concurrently with ECT 710.

710. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Practicum, 5-8 credit hours. Multi-faceted practicum course that encompasses seminar in advanced methods through ECT 705.  A series of planned activities in diverse, integrated school continuums where participants continue to learn and practice their skills in a regulated program supervised by master teachers identified in the autism spectrum concentration. The required High Stakes Artifacts assist the candidates and their supervisors in evaluating their student teaching competencies. Must register for ECT 705 and ECT 710 at the same time. 

720. Universal Design for Learning.  Accommodations/modifications for learners; differentiated instruction; behavioral strategies; positive learning environments. School-based problem research project and field experience.  3-5 hours.

Exceptional Children and Youth (ECY)

600. Introduction to Exceptional Learners. An overview of exceptionality as it pertains to children and adults. Both high and low incidence populations will be examined. Each area of exceptionality will be reviewed in terms of etiology, diagnosis, prevalence, remediation, and educational strategies.

607. Counseling Parents of Exceptional Children. Dynamics of family life and parental and sibling reactions to handicapped individuals are addressed in this course. Prerequisite: ECY 600.

635. Early Development and Intervention in ECSE. Provides an introductory overview of the field of early intervention/early childhood special education (EI/ECSE) including the areas of historical and philosophical foundations of EI/ECSE. legal requirements, characteristics of young children with known or suspected disabilities, family-professional partnerships, service delivery options, recommended practices, current policy issues and trends, and professionalism and ethics. Prerequisite: ECY 600.

636. Instructional Methods for Infants and Preschoolers with Disabilities. Topics central to an adequate understanding of the conceptual and theoretical foundations underlying current educational curricula and methods for young children with disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on developmentally and individually appropriate practices that facilitate inclusive environments, as well as instructional strategies and technologies applied to instructional programs for young children with disabilities. Prerequisites: ECY 600 and 635.

637. Assessment of Young Children with Disabilities. Screening, assessment, program planning, and progress monitoring of young children with known or suspected disabilities. Both child-level and family-level assessment procedures are emphasized. Prerequisites: ECY 600 and 635.

638. Motor and Health Care Needs of Young Children with Disabilities. Effective intervention/education for young children with physical and health impairments. Included in the course are conceptual and theoretical foundations underlying typical and atypical motor development and neurodevelopment. Students become proficient in motor skill facilitation, positioning, handling, feeding and health care management. Prerequisite: ECY 600.

661. Nature and Needs of the Visually Impaired. Historical perspectives; definition and characteristics of persons who are blind, visually impaired or deafblind; and educational considerations. Prerequisite: ECY 600.

662. Methods and Materials for Teaching the Visually Impaired. Principles and procedures for developing and implementing curricula for persons who are blind, visually impaired or deaf-blind. Prerequisites: ECY 600 and 661.

663. Orientation and Mobility. Principles and fundamentals in teaching spatial orientation; guided practicum of demonstration, adaptations necessary for persons who are blind, visually impaired or deaf-blind. Prerequisites: ECY 600, 661, and 662.

664. Braille. Principles of teaching reading, transcribing and writing Braille; tests, curricula and technology for Braille literacy. Prerequisites: ECY 600, 661, 663.

665. Anatomy of the Eye and Educational Implications of Visual Impairments. Knowledge and evaluation of the visual system and use of low vision devices and other prescriptive devices for persons who are blind, visually impaired or deaf-blind; Prerequisites: ECY 600, 661, 663, and 664.

686. Practicum Visual Impairments. Clinical experiences with persons who are blind, visually impaired or deaf-blind in various educational settings; demonstration of curriculum development, assessment, and teaching in structured situations. Prerequisites: ECY 600, 661, 662, 663, 664, and 665.

670. Practicum in ECSE. Provides individualized field-based experiences to meet the unique needs of graduate candidates in ECSE. Students complete practicum experiences in settings that include children who present a wide range of disabilities within the 0-3, 3-5, 5-8 year age ranges. This practicum experience is tailored to the unique needs and experiences of each student. Prerequisites: ECY 600, 635, 636, 637, 638, and Permission of Instructor.

672. Internship in ECSE. Provides individualized field-based experiences that will meet the unique needs of ECSE candidates in the 5th year, nontraditional program. Students complete a 12-week internship in settings that include children who present a wide range of disabilities within the 0-3, 3-5, 5-8 year age ranges. This internship experience is tailored to the unique needs and experiences of each student. Prerequisites: ECY 600, 635, 636, 637, 638, and permission of instructor.

689. Advanced Topics in Special Education. A group seminar focused on transdisciplinary teaming in early intervention and early childhood special education. The course is designed for students representing the discipline of early childhood special education, general early childhood education, speech-language pathology, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor, ECY 600. 1-6 hours.

School Psychometry Course Descriptions

ESP 600 Seminar in School Psychometry  – This course is a survey of school psychometry ethics, the historical foundations, guidelines and standards, legal issues, roles and functions, and contemporary professional issues in the field of school psychometry. Specific items/ideas of discussion will include roles and functions of school psychologists and IDEA 2004 law, NCLB, confidentiality, NASP code of ethics, and cultural and human diversity.

ESP 627 Practicum in School Psychometry- Prerequisite: ESP 600, ESP 628, ESP 629.  1 hour

ESP 628 Individual Assessment of Children and Youth: Part 1 – This course is designed to prepare students to assess children and youth in a manner that reflects federal and state mandates and regulations. Students are prepared to appropriately select, administer, and interpret cognitive assessment instruments designed to answer questions related to eligibility determination and, intervention programming.

ESP 629 Individual Assessment of Children and Youth: Part 2 – This course is designed to prepare candidates to assess children and youth in a manner that reflects federal and state mandates and regulations. Candidates are prepared to appropriately select, administer, and interpret social/emotional, behavioral, ands achievement assessment instruments designed to answer questions related to eligibility determination and, intervention programming.

ESP 689 Internship In School Psychometry - This course is an individualized field-based experience that meets the internship requirements of the state code. Interns are engaged in the full scope of school psychometry activities including individual assessment, data based decision –making, referral and MEDC meetings, and other appropriate duties. Prerequisite: Approval of internship application. 3, 6, or 9 hours