UAB IT Research Computing will host a deep learning workshop with NVIDA on Wednesday, April 11, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Edge of Chaos.

Please register here if you are interested in attending, as it helps in planning for the event.

The first session, from 9 to 11 a.m., will focus on “Deep Learning Demystified.” The lecture will introduce key terminology, use cases from various industries, how deep learning differs from previous algorithmic approaches, and how a deep neutral network gets trained, optimized and deployed.

The second session, from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m., is titled “Applied Deep Learning.” The lecture will cover how to apply deep learning to challenging problems, what types of problems benefit most from deep learning, what skills and knowledge is needed to use deep learning, and the characteristics of successful deep learning projects.

Labs will include "Applications of Deep Learning with Caffe, Theano and Torch" and "Image Classification with NVIDIA DIGITS."

The Edge of Chaos is located on the fourth floor of Lister Hill Library. Contact Thomas Anthony if you have any questions.

UAB IT is off to a running start with its sprints program.

Teams have finished one “sprint” and are preparing for more challenges. A "sprint" refers to a specific amount of time in which technology work must be completed and presented for review by the product owner. The UAB IT sprints program is designed to help create innovative solutions for campus needs. The sprints will give cross-discipline teams an opportunity to create a prototype for these solutions.

UAB IT has worked closely with the team behind the Solution Studio, an interdisciplinary team that connects clinicians and STEM students to solve patient care problems. UAB IT has developed a prototype for an online Solution Studios tool that will connect students and clinicians more quickly and efficiently. The prototype is set to be showcased later this month for university officials and community members.

Other sprint projects include UAB-specific skills for smart devices such as Amazon Alexa; a university calendar; and chatbots for faculty questions and other campus needs.

With space leased at Innovation Depot, the intent is to give teams a creative space to find solutions and to include team members beyond IT professionals.

TravelSafety3
Traveling this spring or summer? Here are some tips to protect your tech and your data while you are on the road or flying the friendly skies.

Protect your tech and data when traveling:

  • Travel only with the data that you need; look at reducing the amount of digital information that you take with you. This may mean leaving some of your devices at home, using temporary devices, removing personal data from your devices, or shifting your data to a secure cloud service. Authorities or criminals can't search what you don't have.
  • Most travelers will likely decide that inconvenience overrides risk and travel with electronic devices anyway. If this is the case, travelers should focus on protecting the information that they take with them. One of the best ways to do this is to use encryption. Make sure to fully encrypt your device and make a full backup of the data that you leave at home.
  • Before you arrive at the border, travelers should power off their devices. This is when the encryption services are at their strongest and will help resist a variety of high-tech attacks that may attempt to break your encryption. Travelers should not rely solely on biometric locks, which can be less secure than passwords.
  • Make sure to log out of browsers and apps that give you access to online content, and remove any saved login credentials (turn off cookies and autofill). This will prevent anyone from using your devices (without your knowledge) to access your private online information. You could also temporarily uninstall mobile apps and clear browser history so that it is not immediately apparent which online services you use.

Get your device travel ready:

  • Change your passwords or passphrases before you go. Consider using a password manager if you don't use one already.
  • Set up multifactor authentication for your accounts whenever possible for an additional layer of security.
  • Delete apps you no longer use.
  • Update any software, including antivirus protection, to make sure you are running the most secure version available.
  • Turn off Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to avoid automatic connections.
  • Turn on "Find My [Device Name]" tracking and/or remote wiping options in case it is lost or stolen.
  • Charge your devices before you go.
  • Stay informed of TSA regulations and be sure to check with the State Department's website for any travel alerts or warnings concerning the specific countries you plan to visit, including any tech restrictions.
  • Clear your devices of any content that may be considered illegal or questionable in other countries, and verify whether the location you are traveling to has restrictions on encrypted digital content.
  • Don't overlook low-tech solutions:
    • Tape over the camera of your laptop or mobile device for privacy.
    • Use a privacy screen on your laptop to avoid people "shoulder surfing" for personal information.
    • Physically lock your devices and keep them on you whenever possible, or use a hotel safe.
    • Label all devices in case they get left behind!

Due to enhanced security measures in most countries, travelers with tech should be prepared for possible disruptions or additional wait times during the screening process. Here are some steps you can take to help secure your devices and your privacy.

Good to know:

  • While traveling within the United States, TSA agents at the gate are not allowed to confiscate your digital devices or demand your passwords.
  • Different rules apply to U.S. border patrol agents and agents in other countries. Federal border patrol agents have broad authority to search everyone entering the U.S. This includes looking through any electronic devices you have with you while you are traveling. They can seize your devices and make a copy for experts to examine offsite.

These guidelines are not foolproof, but security experts say every additional measure taken can help reduce the chances of cybertheft.

FindTimeMicrosoft has released a new tool designed to give Outlook users an easier way to schedule meetings.

FindTime allows colleagues to easily find time for a meeting without emailing back and forth before agreeing on a time.

FindTime is an Outlook add-in that allows you to quickly find time to meet with others by pinpointing times to meet via available free/busy data for your attendees as well as creating a poll where attendees can vote on the times you suggest, and even suggest new times themselves.

While FindTime organizers are required to be in Office 365, FindTime invites can be sent to anyone with an email address. Recipients do not have to have FindTime installed, nor do they have to be Office 365 users.

FindTime’s voting website can be accessed from any device.

For added security, FindTime encrypts personal information (such as your email address) in Azure. FindTime also encrypts information about the invites you create, such as the email subject, the attendees and the email body.

The app is available for Outlook 2013, Outlook 2016, Outlook on the Web and Outlook for Mac.

          

Learn more about FindTime and install it here.

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