Frank Skidmore studies brain images for research on Parkinson's Disease

Frank Skidmore studies brain images for research on Parkinson's Disease

Frank Skidmore, M.D., assistant professor of neurology, is studying brain images for his research on Parkinson’s disease. For Skidmore, the intricacies in size, shape and surface folds of every brain image must be mapped to a template to allow comparisons. The computational power of the UAB supercomputer allows him to “see” in five dimensions for certaintypes of brain images —the computer is able to work in those higher-dimensional spaces that humans cannot. His research can lead to faster diagnoses for his patients —and better treatment. Learn More

Kristina Visscher studies how long term visual input affects the brain

Kristina Visscher studies how long term visual input affects the brain

Kristina Visscher, Ph.D., assistant professor of neurobiology, is studying visual processing, analyzing huge amounts of data per subject. Her work studies how the brain adapts after long-term changes in visual input, such as macular degeneration. Learn More

Ryoichi Kawai is laying the groundwork for a better infrared laser

Ryoichi Kawai is laying the groundwork for a better infrared laser

Ryoichi Kawai, Ph.D., associate professor of physics, uses the supercomputer for what may be the largest calculation on campus —determining the electronic structure for a cube made up of just 216 atoms of zinc sulfide doped with chromium or iron. His research is laying the groundwork for a better infrared laser, which could be used for a variety of treatments from shrinking tumors to removing kidney stones. Learn More

Adrienne Lahti and her team research schizophrenia

Adrienne Lahti and her team research schizophrenia

Dr. Adrienne Lahti, director of the Division of Behavioral Neurobiology at UAB, is a new user to the research computing cluster. When she submitted a grant to the National Institutes of Health in 2017, she received the NIH’s highest possible impact score —placing her application in the first percentile. The NIH reviewer commented, “Excellent imaging, clinical and computing facilities in place.” Lahti’s application has secured $4 million —or up to 10 years of income —for her lab as she and her team research schizophrenia using multimodal brain imaging techniques utilizing the supercomputing cluster. Lahti’s grant is just one example of the power researchers have not just to continue their research but to compete for the grants that fund their labs. Learn More

David Crossman deciphers the human genomes for undiagnosed patients

David Crossman deciphers the human genomes for undiagnosed patients

David Crossman, Ph.D., bioinformatics director in UAB’s Heflin Center for Genomic Science, deciphers the sequences of human genomes for patients seeking a diagnosis in UAB’s Undiagnosed Diseases Program. The expanded computer cluster allows him to get answers in hours as opposedto weeks. Speeding the processing time to crunch genome sequencing data means faster diagnoses —and faster treatment and better health outcomes —for his patients. Learn More

Hassan Fathallah-Shaykh uses new mathematical models to detect cancer

Hassan Fathallah-Shaykh uses new mathematical models to detect cancer

Dr.Hassan Fathallah-Shaykh, a professor of neurology, works to detect cancer in MRI images using new mathematical models and techniques. Using the new technology implemented by this project, Hassan working with an engineering student, won the 2016 Worldwide Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Challengeby analyzing 118,000 MRI images to detect cancer in less than 12 hours. “The supercomputer worked like magic, without any glitches. It is evident that I would not have been able to compete without the supercomputer resource,” he said. Learn More