Marcas Bamman, PhD

Bamman-MarcasProfessor, Departments of Physiology & Biophysics, Medicine and 
Nutrition Sciences Director, Center for Exercise Medicine

Contact Information:

Office Address: Center for Exercise Medicine, MCLM 966
Phone: 996-7937
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Websites: School of Medicine Faculty Profile

                Center for Exercise Medicine

Education:

Kansas State University
BS, Exercise Science, 1989

University of Alabama at Birmingham
MS, Exercise Physiology, 1990

University of Florida College of Medicine
PhD, Physiology 1996

Research Description:

Muscle atrophy and reduced functional capacity are well-established, deleterious consequences of acute (e.g., burn, trauma, disuse) and chronic (e.g., OA/HIV/RA/cancer cachexia, COPD, diabetes mellitus, spinal cord injury) conditions—the most widespread and insidious of which is the degenerative process of normal aging. Because the metabolic and contractile properties of skeletal muscle play essential roles in the overall health and function of the organism, gaining a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying muscle mass and phenotype regulation, as well as key processes to exploit in countermeasure development, is of utmost importance. To this end, mechanisms of adult human skeletal myogenesis and muscle mass regulation remain the overarching areas of study in our laboratory, with a prominent emphasis on the aging muscle. Our primary research objectives span three, inter-related focus areas in human subjects: Objective 1) to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms driving muscle regeneration following damage or injury, while identifying differences responsible for regeneration impairment in the aging muscle; Objective 2) to better understand the primary etiology of muscle atrophy in acute (burn, trauma) and chronic (sarcopenia, cachexia) conditions; and Objective 3) to determine key processes responsible for myofiber hypertrophy in response to mechanical overload, and to exploit these processes with countermeasures to promote muscle re-growth in atrophied patients. To meet these objectives, we are using genomic, proteomic, and in vitro approaches to study the molecular regulation of muscle protein synthesis, proteolysis, and stem (satellite) cell function in humans experiencing atrophy and resistance training-induced hypertrophy. This translational research program takes full advantage of cellular and molecular studies in our Core Muscle Research Laboratory and in vivo functional assessments during clinical trials in the UAB Center for Exercise Medicine. 

Publications

DRC Membership Category:

Senior Scientist