Briles.AAASFaculty members from the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s College of Arts and Sciences and School of Medicine have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

The AAAS is the world’s largest multidisciplinary scientific society and a leading publisher of cutting-edge research through its Science family of journals.

Charles Amsler, Ph.D., professor in the College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Biology, Steven Austad, Ph.D., distinguished professor and chair of the Department of Biology, and David Briles, Ph.D., professor in the School of Medicine’s Department of Microbiology and Department of Pediatrics, are UAB’s three representatives in the 2016 class of AAAS fellows.

Kahan2The hygiene hypothesis proposes that a 20th century surge in allergies and asthma is because people are living in increasingly hygienic environments. Rather than the rural farm life of the agricultural 19th century, families live in urban and suburban communities, have fewer children who can exchange infections, bathe and wash their hands more frequently, and use antibiotics excessively. This all means reduced infant exposure to microbes that would have tempered excessive immune reactions, such as asthma, later in life.

Kahan2Faculty and staff from the School of Medicine gathered Tuesday afternoon to celebrate the promotion of 22 women faculty, 10 of whom had earned the title of full professor and 12 who attained the rank of associate professor...

 

Kahan2Shannon Kahan, a posdoc in in Dr. Allan Zajac’s lab and recent recipient of the state’s only American Cancer Society postdoctoral fellowship, knocked it out of the park during the Office of Postdoctoral Education and Postdoctoral Association celebration...

preeyamDr. Preeyam Patel, a recipient of the 2015 Max D. Cooper Endowed Immunology Travel Award, presented at the International Congress of Immunology in Melbourne Australia last month on how antibodies to phospholipid epitopes can inhibit the interaction of house dust mite with phosphorylcholine-specific receptors on antigen-presenting cells in the lung.

harry shroederUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham researchers are exploring ways to wrap pig tissue with a protective coating to ultimately fight diabetes in humans. The nano-thin bilayers of protective material are meant to deter or prevent immune rejection.

The ultimate goal: transplant insulin-producing cell-clusters from pigs into humans to treat Type 1 diabetes.