FACULTY

J. David Sweatt, Ph.D., Professor and Evelyn F. McKnight Endowed Chair, Department of Neurobiology
Director, McKnight Brain Institute
Director, Civitan International Research Center

Steve Austad, Ph.D., Professor and Chair, Department of Biology 
Karlene Ball, Ph.D., Professor and Chair, Department of Psychology
Mark Bolding, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Division of Advanced Medical Imaging Research  
Virginia Wadley Bradley, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Division of Gerontology, Geriatrics, and Palliative Care

Michael Brenner, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Neurobiology

Jeremy Day, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology
Tara DeSilva, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

Lynn Dobrunz, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Neurobiology

Paul Gamlin, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Ophthalmology
David Geldmacher, M.D., Professor, Department of Neurology and Director of the Div of Memory Disorders
Matthew Goldberg, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Neurology
Michelle Gray, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology

Alecia K. Gross, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Vision Sciences

John Hablitz, Ph.D., Professor, Vice-Chair, Department of Neurobiology
Jeremy Herskowitz, Ph.D.,  Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology
Gwendalyn King, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology

David Knight, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology

Robin Lester, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Neurobiology

Farah Lubin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology

Lori McMahon, Ph.D., Professor, Co-Director McKnight Brain Institute, Dir of the Comp Neuroscience Ctr 

James Meador-Woodruff, M.D., Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurobiology

Michelle Olsen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology

Linda Overstreet-Wadiche, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Neurobiology

Vladimir Parpura, M.D., Associate Professor, Department of Neurobiology

Kazu Nakazawa, M.D., Ph.D.,  Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurobiology
Vladimir Parpura, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Neurobiology  
Scott Phillips, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology

Lucas Pozzo-Miller, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Neurobiology

Erik Roberson, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Co-Director McKnight Brain Institute, Dept of Neurology 

David Standaert, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Chair, Department of Neurology

Anne Theibert, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Neurobiology

Erobo Ubogu, M.D., Professor, Department of Neurology  

Kristina Visscher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology

Jacques Wadiche, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Neurobiology

Scott Wilson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Neurobiology

HISTORY

On November 5, 2004, the University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the establishment of the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute at UAB.

The Institute is located in the new Shelby Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Building on the 9th, 10th, and 11th floors.

The Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute has the long term goal of translating discoveries from basic biomedical research into processes and products to minimize the deleterious effects of aging on learning and memory in humans.

This long term goal is being achieved by:

  • Enhancement of the established research enterprise at UAB through support of pilot research projects, educational symposia and seminars, attendance at conferences and collaborations with investigators at other institutions including the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institutes at the University of Florida, The University of Arizona, and the University of Miami; and
  • Recruitment and establishment of new investigators and equipping of their research laboratories in the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute.

An understanding of aging-related memory disorders requires both direct investigation of aging-related memory dysfunction and an understanding of memory mechanisms per se. The Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute for Age-related Memory Loss at UAB focuses its efforts on understanding both memory and memory dysfunction, approaching the problem at all levels from molecular to cognitive. Thus, basic scientists, translational researchers using model systems for aging-related memory dysfunction, and clinical researchers are being brought into proximity in the Institute. Cross-disciplinary fertilization and intellectual synergy are the rule rather than the exception.

Stated briefly, the goal in developing the Institute is to establish a premier Center for aging-related memory studies in the United States. The focus is on both developing new treatments for aging-related memory disorders and understanding the basic processes underlying age-related memory dysfunction.

An additional important component of the Institute mission is augmenting the training and teaching goals of the University of Alabama at Birmingham. This involves the development of new courses concerning aging-related memory dysfunction, memory function per se, and translational research in the memory dysfunction area. These courses and training programs emphasize the modern multidisciplinary approach to memory and memory dysfunction, and involve graduate students, medical students, post-doctoral fellows, and resident trainees.

The establishment of the McKnight Brain Institute at UAB represents a unique opportunity because the topic area is so timely. The importance of aging-related memory dysfunction has never been more clear, and the ongoing increase in the average age of the US citizenry suggests a continued high level of importance of this research area.

In summary, the McKnight Brain Institute represents a unified scientific and clinical focus on aging-related memory dysfunction, and also houses a core of investigators of the absolute highest quality. This provides the initiative and momentum for the continued development of the McKnight Brain Institute as a pre-eminent locale for aging-related memory research in the US.