News

Will I have Alzheimer’s? Personalized dementia risk assessment now available at UAB

Neurologist David Geldmacher, M.D., who leads the University of Alabama at Birmingham memory disorders program, sees a lot of older patients with memory loss, dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.One of the questions frequently asked of him by the caregivers of these patients, often a spouse or the patients’ adult children, is “could this happen to me?”

“It is very common for family members of a patient receiving a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or other form of dementia to wonder about their own risk,” said Geldmacher, the director of the UAB Division of Memory Disorders and Behavioral Neurology.

Geldmacher is launching a new clinical effort — the first of its type in the United States — to prepare a personalized dementia risk assessment for people concerned about their risk for developing memory problems as they age. The assessment will include family history, a detailed memory history for the patient, cognitive testing and a baseline MRI scan. That information can be incorporated into existing risk predictor models that have been validated by research studies to produce an accurate risk assessment.

Patients will get a comprehensive analysis from Geldmacher, including information on nonmodifiable risk factors such as age and family history, as well as strategies for dealing with modifiable risk factors like weight, diet, blood pressure and level of physical activity. He says research in the field has shown that reducing one or more risk factors can have a significant effect on reducing one’s overall chances of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

David Geldmacher is launching a new clinical effort — the first of its type in the United States — to prepare a personalized dementia risk assessment for people concerned about their risk for developing memory problems as they age.
“Our goal is to understand what risk factors are present in each individual and create a plan that best helps them reduce their risk and make appropriate plans for the future,” Geldmacher said.

The assessment is targeted primarily at individuals in their 50s and 60s, and it will provide a 20-year risk prediction. It can also be used for individuals in later life, with a six-year risk prediction.

“For most people, Alzheimer’s disease is an illness you live with, not an illness from which you die,” Geldmacher said. “With a better understanding of individual risk, there are steps that people can take to minimize the risk for serious memory loss.”  

Patients will have two clinical visits with Geldmacher and his staff. The first will be to compile histories and conduct testing. The second will be to review a personalized treatment plan, including how to access resources to help achieve lifestyle changes, and where to find supportive and educational materials. The clinic will also suggest coping strategies that can be employed to ease the burden of dementia on the individual and his or her family. The two-visit assessment is fee-for-service and will cost about $1,000, which includes the MRI scan.

Geldmacher says this risk assessment service appears to be the first in the nation offered in a clinical setting and not as part of a research study.

“It’s really for those who are worried about their cognitive health but do not currently have major memory issues,” he said. “People with active memory or cognitive issues that interfere with everyday activities are best cared for through the services of our existing UAB Memory Disorders Clinic.”

Geldmacher anticipates that the risk assessment clinic will also ultimately serve as a gateway to research projects aimed at finding medications or other treatments designed to lower risk of memory disorders.

Call 205-975-7575 for more information or to make an appointment for a personalized dementia risk assessment.

By: Bob Shephard - UAB Media Relations

Study of blood-thinners to advance personalized medicine

Blood-thinners help prevent and treat strokes, heart attacks and venous clots, but not without the risk of uncontrolled bleeding. Determining who may develop this common complication and the reasons for it is the goal of a UAB study examining the ways varied factors influences individual response to these drugs.UAB, which developed one of the largest, most racially diverse, prospective warfarin-study cohorts in the country, is uniquely qualified to conduct real-time studies of its effects, said Nita Limdi, Pharm.D., Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Neurology and primary investigator of the new study.

“This enables us to observe bleeding complications to better understand and study the influence of genes, clinical factors and environment,” Limdi said. That capability is valuable in understanding this process and a key element in securing a $3.5 million grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, one of the National Institutes of Health.

UAB’s comprehensive genomic approach will assess both common and rare genetic variations to identify novel genetic variants associated with hemorrhage in warfarin (Coumadin), the most commonly used oral anticoagulant, and also dabigatran (Pradaxa).

UAB, which developed one of the largest, most racially diverse, prospective warfarin-study cohorts in the country, is uniquely qualified to conduct real-time studies of its effects.
Limdi says this research is another step toward personalized medicine. The study will begin to develop algorithms, including clinical, genetic and environmental factors, to predict a patient’s risk of hemorrhage. Such tools will enable clinicians to refine patient-specific, risk-benefit assessments and help determine personalized choices for oral anticoagulant therapy.

Limdi, along with colleagues Timothy Beasley, Ph.D., and Nianjun Liu, Ph.D., associate professors in the Department of Biostatistics, and Todd Brown, M.D., assistant professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Disease, are recruiting subjects for the new study. Call 205-996-6009 or email
ayourich@uab.edu
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
,
jfuller@uabmc.edu
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
or
hraiford@uab.edu
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
to inquire.



         

Published in Research & Scholarship

UAB Epilepsy Center gains Level 4 recognition again

The Epilepsy Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham has again been recognized as a Level 4 Epilepsy Center by the National Association of Epilepsy Centers.“Level 4 epilepsy centers have the professional expertise and facilities to provide the highest-level medical and surgical evaluation and treatment for patients with complex epilepsy,” according to David Labiner, M.D., president of NAEC.

Centers designating Level 3 or Level 4 status attest that their epilepsy center meets the criteria stated in the NAEC Guidelines for Essential Services, Personnel, and Facilities in Specialized Epilepsy Centers in the United States.

UAB’s center, housed in the Department of Neurology under the direction of Jerzy Szaflarski, M.D., Ph.D., features six neurologists specializing in epilepsy, along with specialists in neurosurgery, pharmacology and neuropsychology. The center is also home to the new UAB Cannabidiol Program, created by the passage of Carly’s Law by the Alabama legislature.

Bob Shephard

Dr. David S. Geldmacher named the Patsy W. and Chales A. Collat Endowed Professorship in Neuroscience

Endowed professorship in neuroscience established – The University of Alabama System Board of Trustees approved the establishment of the Patsy W. and Charles A. Collat Endowed Professorship in Neuroscience in the UAB Department of Neurology and named David S. Geldmacher, M.D., its inaugural holder during its meeting April 4. The position will promote research and education in neuroscience with a focus in memory disorders. The Collats have given numerous gifts to UAB, and to UAB’s neuroscience program in particular, including making possible the Charles A. and Patsy W. Collat Endowed Chair in Neurosurgery. Geldmacher joined the UAB faculty in 2011 and directs the Division of Memory Disorders and Behavioral Neurology.