News

Dr. David Standaert demonstrates smell test for Parkinson's study

David Standaert, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Chair of Neurology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham was recently in the news to demonstrate how to use a scratch-and-sniff test that is being used in a worldwide study to detect Parkinson's disease in its earliest stages. To see the full story please click the link below:

http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2013/07/scratch-and-sniff_test_for_par.html

Dr. Martina Bebin garners major Tuberous Sclerosis award

Martina Bebin, M.D. Associate Professor of Neurology and Pediatrics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has been named the Manuel R. Gomez, M.D., award winner by the Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance.  The award was established in 1995 to honor Gomez, who is often called the father of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in the United States.

The award is given annually to an individual who has made a significant breakthrough in tuberous sclerosis complex research, or for their body of research to advance understanding of TSC, and/or to provide clinical care for individuals with the disease.

Parkinson's Action Network interviews Dr. Ashley Harms

Parkinson's Action Network recently interviewed Dr. Ashley Harms, one of PAN's Alabama Assistant State Directors. Dr. Harms discusses her involvement with PAN, her Parkinson's research, and her views on the scientific community's role in advocacy.

Dr. Harms currently serves as a Post-Doctoral Trainee in the Department of Neurology, Center for Neurodegenerative and Experimental Therapeutics under the mentorship of Dr. David Standaert. To read the full interview click below:

http://www.parkinsonsaction.org/news/meet-dr-ashley-harms-parkinsons-researcher-and-pan-alabama-assistant-state-director

Genetic Marker Enables Better Prediction of Warfarin Dose in Patients of African Ancestry

A new-found genetic marker promises to better predict warfarin dose in African Americans, according to a study published online in The Lancet. If confirmed in further studies, the finding may help to avert more of the bleeds and blood clots that come when a patients's starting dose misses the drug's narrow safety window. To read the full story click below:

http://www.uab.edu/news/latest/item/3520-genetic-marker-enables-better-prediction-of-warfarin-dose-in-patients-of-african-ancestry