Bob Shepard

Bob Shepard

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Media Specialist, UAB News
(205) 934-8934 
bshep@uab.edu

A 16-year veteran of UAB, Shepard previously had a career in television news, serving as a photographer, field producer and documentary producer at stations in Lexington, Ky.; Norfolk, Va.; and Birmingham. He spends a fair amount of free time canoeing the rivers of the southern Appalachians and believes that his beloved Chicago Cubs will win the World Series this year. Finally.

Beats include: Callahan Eye Foundation Hospital; Center for Aging; Center for Palliative Care; Comprehensive Neuroscience Center; Emergency Medicine; Gene Therapy Center; Gerontology, Geriatrics and Palliative Care; Gregory F. James Cystic Fibrosis Center; Heflin Genetics Center; Nutrition Sciences; School of Health Professions; School of Medicine; Trauma, Burn and Surgical Critical Care
Dancers kick up their heels to support research into healthy aging at the fourth annual event.

Studies zero in on potential biomarkers in muscle tissue for Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Singh will develop a medical decision making guide for African-American and Hispanic lupus patients with kidney disease.
A UAB study discovers a pathway used by malignant tumor cells to invade healthy parts of the brain, giving researchers a fresh target for drug discovery.
A grant will establish the new Bachmann-Strauss Dystonia and Parkinson’s Disease Centers of Excellence at UAB and two other medical centers.
A clinical review from geriatricians urges primary care physicians to take a more aggressive role in ascertaining the mobility of their older patients.
This screening event is free and open to all as part of Equal Access Birmingham’s goal to provide healthcare education and address the needs of the locally underserved.
Researchers found differences in polymerase chains thought to be similar, potentially opening new pathways toward cancer drug development.
Researchers show long-term efficacy of the first FDA approved drug for vasculitis.
Investigators at UAB and colleagues at other universities have launched a study of a new, low-strength magnetic field as a potential therapy for depression.