Alabama now has more EPSCoR Track II grants than any other state following the award of basic science grants meant to stimulate competitive research in regions of the country traditionally less able to compete for such research funds.
UAB and Auburn will team up for a study of magnetic resonance imaging techniques that could enhance epilepsy surgery.
This NIH-funded conference is part of UAB’s effort to engage and retain neuroscience graduate students from underrepresented ethnic and racial groups across the United States.
Altered excitability is seen in brain neurons in epilepsy, depression, drug addiction and other disorders, and this discovery may offer a potential therapeutic target.
The ecRNAs appear to act in memory formation, and may offer a new therapeutic approach to neuropsychiatric diseases.
John J. Hablitz, Ph.D., has been a leader in the department since its establishment in 1996. 
Researchers have proposed a model that resolves a seeming paradox in one of the most intriguing areas of the brain, exploring how immature granule cells in the dentate gyrus appear able to enhance pattern separation due to lesser synaptic connectivity than mature cells.
Grant named in memory of Kindal Kivisto will help advance research, treatment of Pitt Hopkins Syndrome.
UAB researchers find that epigenetic changes associated with chronic obesity alter expression of memory-related genes in the brain.
Five faculty members in the School of Medicine have been named the 2016 class of James A. Pittman Jr., M.D., Scholars, a program organized to recognize the contributions of junior faculty and support the retention of highly competitive scientists and physician-scientists.
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