Complex contact lenses keep disabled vet rolling
Teamwork Saves A Child's Vision
UAB program opens doors to drivers who are sight-impaired
Protect your eyes: A baseball player's story
UAB pilot program brings glaucoma screenings closer to home
  • Dreer participates in panel discussion about concussions

    Laura Dreer, Ph.D., associate professor of ophthalmology, will participate in WBHM’s Issues and Ales panel discussion on Thursday, July 23, from 5:30-8pm. The topic is “Concussions and the Price of Playing Football.” Much of Dr. Dreer’s clinical research focuses on head injury, and she is chair of the Alabama Statewide Return-to-Learn Task Force, which aims to develop guidelines about when it is safe to return to school or work after a concussion. She will discuss specific strategies that can be used to help promote concussion awareness, prevention, and recovery.

  • UAB study finds that seniors in subsidized housing have higher rates of vision impairment

    Older adults living in subsidized housing facilities have higher rates of vision impairment than their peers, according to a study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Ophthalmology.

    The findings, published in The Gerontologist, were based on vision screenings for 238 residents of 14 federally subsidized senior housing facilities in Jefferson County, Ala. Forty percent of those surveyed failed distance vision screenings, and 58 percent failed near vision screenings, considerably higher than the rate of visual impairment in the general older adult population, which is typically between 10 and 20 percent.

  • Grandmother’s vision struggle motivates young woman to make a difference

    Curcio Owsley AseemAs a young girl in Afghanistan, Fazila Aseem watched her grandmother struggle to complete daily tasks independently due to vision loss. Her grandmother was unable to see well enough to prepare a simple meal for herself, and there was nothing Afghan doctors could do to restore or repair her vision.

  • A lifetime of insights gained from a few hours without sight

    For 23 diners in Birmingham last Thursday, Dinner in the Dark was a real eye-opening experience, especially since the diners were blindfolded. The event gave sighted individuals some understanding of what it means to be visually impaired.

  • UAB researcher awarded $1.23 million grant for glaucoma research

    Downs newwebJ. Crawford Downs, Ph.D., vice chair of Research in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Ophthalmology, was awarded a three-year, $1.23 million grant from the National Eye Institute to explore intraocular pressure fluctuation as it relates to the development and progression of glaucoma, a potentially blinding disease that affects more than 2.2 million Americans.