In response to news reports suggesting a possible new federal commission on immunizations, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Department of Pediatrics and Children’s of Alabama reiterate our strong support the use of vaccines according to the schedule recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
The scientific evidence and public health statistics are comprehensive and compelling – vaccines are safe, vaccines are effective and vaccines save lives. The benefits of the current vaccine schedule clearly outweigh the risks. Delaying vaccines leaves children and communities at risk. We want to partner with all parents and guardians to give the children of Alabama the chance to grow up without the diseases that in past decades killed so many children before adulthood.

David Kimberlin, M.D., Pediatric Infectious Disease, discussed the benefits of vaccinations at a press briefing on Thursday, Jan. 12. Click here to watch the media brief.
UAB, CHILDREN’S TOUT SAFETY AND BENEFITS OF VACCINATIONS

In response to news reports suggesting a possible new federal commission on immunizations, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Department of Pediatrics and Children’s of Alabama reiterate our strong support the use of vaccines according to the schedule recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
The scientific evidence and public health statistics are comprehensive and compelling – vaccines are safe, vaccines are effective and vaccines save lives. The benefits of the current vaccine schedule clearly outweigh the risks. Delaying vaccines leaves children and communities at risk. We want to partner with all parents and guardians to give the children of Alabama the chance to grow up without the diseases that in past decades killed so many children before adulthood.


David Kimberlin, M.D., Pediatric Infectious Disease, discussed the benefits of vaccinations at a press briefing on Thursday, Jan. 12. Click here to watch the media brief. 
DR. ABDUL-LATIF RECOGNIZED AT BOT MEETING

During the University of Alabama Board of Trustees February 2017 meeting in Birmingham at UAB, a number of outstanding UAB faculty members will be recognized. The dean's leadership team selected Hussein Abdul-Latif, M.D., Pediatric Endocrinology, to be recognized as representation of physicians at UAB. This meeting will take place Feb. 3 in the Student Hill Center. 
 
AOA CLASS OF 2017 INDUCTEES

The University of Alabama School of Medicine Chapter of Alpha Omega Alpha announced its Faculty, Fellow, Resident and Alumni AOA Class of 2017. Among the inductees was Meghan Hofto, M.D., Pediatric Hospital Medicine Fellow. To view a list of inductees, click here

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society is a professional medical organization that recognizes and advocates for excellence in scholarship and the highest ideals in the profession of medicine.

RESIDENT QI PROJECT AWARDED MOC CREDIT

The class of 2016 resident-led quality improvement (QI) project, Documentation of Quality Measures for Patients Discharged from the Hospital with an Acute Asthma Exacerbation, was awarded MOC Part 4 credit by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP). This project is an ongoing multidisciplinary QI collaborative to improve the care for asthma patients admitted to Children's of Alabama. By implementing a standardized history and physical template for patients admitted for asthma exacerbations, they demonstrated statistically significant improvement in several measures including assessment and treatment of chronic level of asthma severity and smoking cessation counseling. This work also has been presented at SSPR and the UAB RIME conference. Investigators included: Drs. Christina Inman, Ryan Boggs, Sam Strachan, Natalia Lotz, Rose James, Brian Donahue, Ashley Dodd, Thanh Summerlin, and Charrelle Coates, along with faculty mentor Dr. Susan Walley. 
IN THE NEWS
MULTINATIONAL STUDY FINDS HIGH RATES OF ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN CHILDREN ADMITTED TO ICUS WORLDWIDE

One of every four children admitted to pediatric intensive care units around the world develops acute kidney injury, which increases the risk of death and leads to longer and more intensive hospitalizations, according to a study published online in The New England Journal of Medicine. UAB in partnership with Children’s of Alabama were one of 36 hospitals across the world, representing 25 countries in 6 continents to collaborate in this Pediatric Prospective AKI (ppAKI) collaborative study.

“This is a landmark study in the field of pediatric AKI, given the global nature of the study and its important findings," said David Askenazi, M.D., director of the Pediatric and Infant Center for Acute Nephrology (PICAN) and professor in the UAB Department of Pediatrics Division of Nephrology.

Click here to read the press release on UAB news. 
SAVE THESE DATES
UAB'S ARTS IN MEDICINE - MEDICAL MUSIC DAY

Are you a musician in the UAB medical community? Learn how YOU can play on UAB Medical Music Day. An informational meeting will be held Jan. 25 at 4 p.m. in the West Pavillion Conference Center, Room A.
Contact Justin Schwartz, M.D., Developmental Pediatrics, or Kimberly Kirklin, Director of Education Curation & UAB's Institute for Arts in Medicine, with any questions.
Download the flyer
SAVE THE DATE FOR RARE DISEASE SYMPOSIUM - MARCH 3

Children’s will be hosting the 4th Annual “Genetics and Genomics in Day to Day Medical Practice” Rare Disease Symposium in the Bradley Lecture Center from 8 a.m. till 3:30 p.m. on Friday, March 3, 2017. Cost to attend is $35. Register at www.childrensal.org/genetics. Keynote address by Dr. Deborah Krakow of UCLA. Contact Shaila Handattu with questions at hande@uab.edu. More information is available here
FACULTY RECRUIT SEMINAR - JAN. 23

The Departments of Microbiology and Pediatrics present a Faculty Recruit Seminar on Jan. 23 at Noon in BBRB 170. Brian Rudd, MPH, PhD, Assistant Professor of Immunology at Cornell University College of Veteran Medicine, will present "Age-Related Changes in the CD8+ T Cell Response to Infection." Click here to view the flyer. 
UPCOMING PEDIATRIC HIV/AIDS COURSE

The American Academy of Pediatrics, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society will be hosting an HIV/AIDS Course, March 7-8, 2017 in Memphis, TN. Core concepts in pediatric HIV/AIDS care are taught in large group sessions, then followed by case-based workshops and interactive sessions which reinforce and highlight complicated case management. The target audience is nurses, residents, and fellows in training, as well as clinicians (physicians, advanced practice nurses, and physician assistants) looking for a refresher course on pediatric HIV/AIDS care designed in accordance with US perinatal HIV transmission and pediatric/adolescent HIV/AIDS care guidelines. View the brochure
 
For more information visit:  www.stjude.org/HIV-Course
MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND ORGANIZING FOR SUCCESS PRESENTATIONS

UAB Medicine leaders will share updates on Organizing for Success at three meetings in January. Faculty are encouraged to attend the sessions scheduled for their departments. Click here to view the sessions. 

The Department of Pediatrics is invited to attend the January 24 session at 7 a.m. in the Margaret Cameron Spain Auditorium. If you are unable to attend the session for your department, please attend another session. 
CHIF SCHEDULE - JANUARY 2017

Child Health Investigative Forum | Bradley Conference Center | Noon (lunch provided) 

Jan. 20 
Exome Sequencing in Newborns
Pankaj Agrawal, M.D.
Medical Director, Manton Center
Gene Discovery Core
Boston Children’s Hospital

Click here to view the full schedule. 
PEDIATRIC GRAND ROUNDS - UP NEXT: 

Thursday, Jan. 26
Noon | Bradley Lecture Center

Cystic Fibrosis Management: All Care is Local
Hector H. Gutierrez, M.D.
Professor, UAB Division of Pediatric Pulmonology
FROM THE PEDIATRIC RESIDENCY OFFICE
PEDIATRIC RESIDENCY 2018 - 2019 CO-CHIEF RESIDENTS 

It is with great pleasure that we announce the selection of Drs. Jamie Powell, Robert (Rob) Sellers, and Karlene Walker as Pediatric Co-Chief Residents for the 2018-2019 academic year.

We greatly appreciate the input and recommendations from faculty and residents in this difficult selection process. It is clear that Jamie, Rob, and Karlene have the admiration and respect of our residents, fellows, and faculty and will serve as strong leaders for our residency programs.
 
Please join us in extending congratulations to Jamie, Rob and Karlene!
FROM THE OFFICE OF FACULTY DEVELOPMENT (OFD)

CELEBRATING DIVERSITY 

Do you have a favorite dish that celebrates your heritage-- your home state, home country, religion, etc.?

On February 3, 2017 from 5 - 7 p.m., the School of Medicine Office for Diversity and Inclusion is hosting a Diversity Fair to honor the diversity which makes us EXCELLENT.
  
Each department has been asked to join in this celebration by setting up a booth featuring multicultural foods.

Let’s showcase the diversity of the Department of Pediatrics. Contact OFD for details regarding food entries.

UAB COMMEMORATES DIVERSITY WITH COMMUNITY MONTH CELEBRATION 

In celebration of Community Month and campus diversity, the African American Faculty
Association and UAB Libraries developed the Reflection of Civil Rights and Human Rights Lecture
Series.
 This year, the sponsored event is a screening of the film: Get in the Way: the Journey of John
Lewis 
(Early Light Productions). 

The film will be shown on Jan. 19, 4:30 p.m. in the Hill Center Alumni Theater. Click here for more information. Download the flyer
 
CAMPUS-COMMUNITY FORUM

A campus-community forum will take place on Jan. 19 from 6 - 8 p.m. in Heritage Hall Room 102. The topic is "A Dialogue on Civility and Decoding Activism in the 21st Century." For more information, download the flyer

For a list of all activities planned as part of Community Month, click here
FROM THE PEDIATRIC RESEARCH OFFICE (PRO) 
FUNDING
 
2017 CDC Special Interest Projects (SIPs)
Applications must be submitted through the UAB Prevention Research Center – the Center for the Study of Community Health. This supplemental funding allows investigators to design, test, and disseminate effective applied public health prevention research strategies to include behavioral interventions, environmental or system-wide solutions, and strategies that address major causes of disease and disability.  LOIs are due Jan. 19 by 5 p.m. and applications by Feb. 22 at 4 p.m.
 
American Heart Association Research Program Announcements for Cardiovascular or Stroke Research
The AHA has several opportunities available: the Fellow-to-Faculty Transition Award, the Mentored Clinical and Population Research Award (for pilot studies), the Scientist Development Grant (for highly promising new scientists on their way to independence), and the Grant-in-Aid (for independent investigators with innovative and advanced projects). All are due Feb. 14, except the Grant-in-Aid, which is due Feb. 17. 
 
SEMINARS AND TRAINING
 
Kaizen-based Game to Teach Reproducibility 
The CCTS has launched a new web-based quiz game to help investigators respond to the NIH policy requiring formal training in scientific rigor and reproducibility. Based on the Kaizen (Japanese for “continuous improvement”) platform developed by CCTS Informatics, this game offers a fun alternative for those who must master new competencies. The first game will take place on Monday, Jan. 23.  Gamers must register by emailing Brian Wallace with their first and last name, institution, and email address. 
 
Third Short Course on Strengthening Causal Inference in Behavioral Obesity Research 
UAB will lead a NIH-funded short course July 24 - 28 to provide rigorous exposure to the key fundamental principles that guide a broad array of techniques used to identify causal relations between social and behavioral factors and variations in obesity. Applications are due March 31.
 
Registration now Open for Immunogenomics 2017 (October 2 - 4)
Immunogenomics 2017 is an international conference that brings together leaders and researchers exploring the application of genomic technologies to understand the immune system and development of disease. Register today to reserve your spot and take advantage of early bird savings by June 30. The deadline for abstracts is July 24.
 
NIH has Implemented New Good Clinical Practices (GCP) Training Requirements
This requirement became effective Jan. 1 for all UAB investigators and staff involved in clinical trials, regardless of funding source. Current GCP training (within the past 3 years) will be required for new protocols that meet the NIH definition of a clinical trial submitted to the Office of the IRB as of Jan. 1, and ongoing protocols must meet this requirement by Feb. 28.
 
OTHER
 
Sign up for an Open Researcher and Contributor Identification (ORCID)
ORCID is a registry of persistent unique identifiers for researchers and scholars. It automates connections to research objects such as publications, grants and patents and serves as a unique and universal identifier. Registration is very brief and available here
 
Congratulations to Investigators accepted into 2017 Clinical and Translational Science Training Program (CTSTP)
  • Steven Nye – Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
  • Robert Richter – Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
  • Aaron Yee –Neonatology
The CTSTP is a six-month certificate program that provides training in clinical and translational research, including approximately 50 hours of didactic instruction as well as interactive experiences. Course content represents the following modules: clinical trials, epidemiology, biostatistics, ethics, clinical genetics research, behavioral research, outcomes research, dissemination of results, and grant writing and funding opportunities. Participants identify a research project and mentor. 
 
Clinical Trial Budget Guidelines and Information
CRSP has developed clinical trial budget guidelines and items to consider while developing a draft budget.  This document is housed on the research website with other budget-related information.
PRE - AWARD RESEARCH

eRA Latest News
 
PUBLICATIONS
 2016 Dec 5. pii: blood-2016-09-738104. Severe anemia early in life as a risk factor for sickle cell kidney disease. Aban I, Baddam S, Hilliard LM, Howard TH, Feig D, Lebensburger JD.
Patients with Sickle Cell Disease develop microalbuminuria. This manuscript explored the impact of severe anemia in SCD and identified that 60% of infants with hemoglobin < 8.0 g/dL developed microalbuminuria during early adolescence.

Neuroscience. 2016 Jun 2;324:469-84. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2016.03.014. Altered metabolic activity in the developing brain of rats predisposed to high versus low depression-like behavior. McCoy CR, Golf SR, Melendez-Ferro M, Perez-Costas E, Glover ME, Jackson NL, Stringfellow SA, Pugh PC, Fant AD, Clinton SM.
Using a multidisciplinary approach, a well characterized animal model of anxiety and depression was used to assess brain metabolism at several time-points during postnatal development. First, transcriptome profiling revealed vast differences in the expression of genes involved in cellular metabolism, in anxiety-prone compared to non-anxiety prone rats. After this first findings, further assessment of the expression and activity of cytochrome oxidase (COX) — a key enzyme in cellular metabolism and more specifically in the production of ATP —, revealed also significant reductions in COX activity in specific brain areas of anxiety-prone rats during early stages of postnatal development. Together these findings support that early postnatal alterations in brain metabolism may play a key role in psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression.

 2016 Oct 20;7(10):e2427. doi: 10.1038/cddis.2016.327.Mitochondrial angiotensin receptors in dopaminergic neurons. Role in cell protection and aging-related vulnerability to neurodegeneration. Valenzuela R, Costa-Besada MA, Iglesias-Gonzalez J, Perez-Costas E, Villar-Cheda B, Garrido-Gil P, Melendez-Ferro M, Soto-Otero R, Lanciego JL, Henrion D, Franco R, Labandeira-Garcia JL.
This multi-national and interdisciplinary study demonstrates for the first time the presence of angiotensin receptors within mitochondria of brain 
cells, and specifically shows evidence of the role of this system in dopaminergic transmission. Previous studies have found that angiotensin receptors are present in the brain, however, this is the first study to specifically localize them to mitochondria, and assess their functioning in these cellular organelles. In addition, it also shows that angiotensin receptors are abundantly present in the mitochondria of dopaminergic cells. Altered expression of these receptors with aging may induce mitochondrial dysfunction, the main risk factor for neurodegeneration. Future studies should also explore the potential role of these receptors during brain development.

The ASHA Leader. 2017 January. Vol. 22, 18-20. doi:10.1044/leader.AEA.22012017.18.What to Know About Advances in CMV Detection, Prevention. Fowler K, Ross S. 

Ann Surg Oncol. 2017 Jan 5. doi: 10.1245/s10434-016-5747-5. Breast Malignancies in Children: Presentation, Management, and Survival. Richards MK, Goldin AB, Beierle EA,Doski JJ, Goldfarb M, Langer M, Nuchtern JG, Vasudevan S, Gow KW, Javid SH.

Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2017 Jan;18(1):85-87. doi: 10.1097/PCC.0000000000000989.Defining Low Cardiac Output Syndrome: An Ode to Justice Potter Stewart. Alten JA,Gaies M.
This was an invited editorial about a recently published low cardiac output prediction model.


J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2017 Jan 3. pii: S1083-3188(16)30344-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jpag.2016.12.004. Extramedullary Relapse of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Presenting as Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: A Case Report. Robillard DT, Kutny MA, Chewning JH, Arbuckle JL.

J Clin Oncol. 2017 Jan 9:JCO2016716712. Clonal Hematopoiesis Associated With Adverse Outcomes After Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation for Lymphoma. Gibson CJ, Lindsley RC, Tchekmedyian V, Mar BG, Shi J, Jaiswal S, Bosworth A, Francisco L, He J, Bansal A, Morgan EA, Lacasce AS, Freedman AS, Fisher DC, Jacobsen E, Armand P, Alyea EP, Koreth J, Ho V, Soiffer RJ, Antin JH, Ritz J, Nikiforow S, Forman SJ, Michor F, Neuberg D, Bhatia R, Bhatia S, Ebert BL.
We showed that in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for lymphoma, clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP) at the time of transplantation is associated with inferior survival and increased risk of therapy-related leukemia – suggesting that we can screen patients before transplantation that are at risk for these adverse outcomes.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2017 Jan 5. pii
: S1083-8791(17)30076-9. doi: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.01.006. Cardiovascular Function in Long-Term Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Survivors. Armenian SH, Horak D, Scott JM, Mills G, Siyahian A, BeranoTeh J, Douglas PS, Forman SJ, Bhatia S, Jones LW.
Despite the presence of normal (>50%) resting left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation, 25% had markedly abnormal LV longitudinal strain, an advanced echocardiographic measure of myocardial dysfunction. These findings highlight the role of stress-based measures and advanced myocardial imaging to characterize risk of cardiovascular disease in HCT survivors, setting the stage for tailored interventions to prevent cardiovascular disease with its attendant morbidity and mortality.

Muscle Nerve. 2017 Jan 9. doi: 10.1002/mus.25567. Anti-HMGCR necrotizing myopathy masquerading as a muscular dystrophy in a child. Mohassel P, Foley AR, Donkervoort S, Fequiere PR, Pak K, Bönnemann CG, Mammen AL.

J Am Coll Surg. 2017 Jan 6. 
pii: S1072-7515(16)31726-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2016.12.022. Utilization of the NSQIP-Pediatric Database in Development and Validation of a New Predictive Model of Pediatric Postoperative Wound Complications. Maizlin II, Redden DT, Beierle EA, Chen MK, Russell RT.
Recent literature has questioned the accuracy of predicting SSI risk based on wound classification. We utilized the National Quality Surgical Improvement-Pediatric (NSQIP-P) Participant Use File evaluating over 180,000 pediatric patients and their risk of postoperative wound infection. Our model significantly improved predictive ability for postoperative SSIs than the current wound classification system. This model will allow providers to more effectively counsel families and patients of these risks, and more accurately reflect true risks for individual surgical patients to hospitals and payers.


Lancet Respir Med. 2016 Feb;4(2):107-15. doi: 10.1016/S2213-2600(15)00545-7. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of ivacaftor in patients aged 2-5 years with cystic fibrosis and a CFTR gating mutation (KIWI): an open-label,single-arm study. Davies JC, Cunningham S, Harris WT, Lapey A, Regelmann WE, Sawicki GS, Southern KW, Robertson S, Green Y, Cooke J, Rosenfeld M; KIWI Study Group.
This study evaluated the safety and potential benefit of lumacaftor in CF toddlers with the G551D mutation. Lumacaftor is a CFTR directed therapy that has pries open the CFTR channel. Results from this study laid the foundation for FDA approval in children aged 2 to 5.
The deadline for submission of information for inclusion in the FYI Fridays newsletter is 10 a.m. on the preceding Thursday.
 
Click here to submit information to FYI Fridays.
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During the University of Alabama Board of Trustees February 2017 meeting in Birmingham at UAB, a number of outstanding UAB faculty members will be recognized. The dean's leadership team selected Hussein Abdul-Latif, M.D., Pediatric Endocrinology, to be recognized as representation of physicians at UAB. This meeting will take place Feb. 3 in the Student Hill Center. 
The University of Alabama School of Medicine Chapter of Alpha Omega Alpha announced its Faculty, Fellow, Resident and Alumni AOA Class of 2017. Among the inductees was Meghan Hofto, M.D., Pediatric Hospital Medicine Fellow. To view a list of inductees, click here

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society is a professional medical organization that recognizes and advocates for excellence in scholarship and the highest ideals in the profession of medicine.
The class of 2016 resident-led quality improvement (QI) project, Documentation of Quality Measures for Patients Discharged from the Hospital with an Acute Asthma Exacerbation, was awarded MOC Part 4 credit by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP). This project is an ongoing multidisciplinary QI collaborative to improve the care for asthma patients admitted to Children's of Alabama. By implementing a standardized history and physical template for patients admitted for asthma exacerbations, they demonstrated statistically significant improvement in several measures including assessment and treatment of chronic level of asthma severity and smoking cessation counseling. This work also has been presented at SSPR and the UAB RIME conference. Investigators included: Drs. Christina Inman, Ryan Boggs, Sam Strachan, Natalia Lotz, Rose James, Brian Donahue, Ashley Dodd, Thanh Summerlin, and Charrelle Coates, along with faculty mentor Dr. Susan Walley. 
One of every four children admitted to pediatric intensive care units around the world develops acute kidney injury, which increases the risk of death and leads to longer and more intensive hospitalizations, according to a study published online in The New England Journal of Medicine. UAB in partnership with Children’s of Alabama were one of 36 hospitals across the world, representing 25 countries in 6 continents to collaborate in this Pediatric Prospective AKI (ppAKI) collaborative study.

“This is a landmark study in the field of pediatric AKI, given the global nature of the study and its important findings," said David Askenazi, M.D., director of the Pediatric and Infant Center for Acute Nephrology (PICAN) and professor in the UAB Department of Pediatrics Division of Nephrology.

Click here to read the press release on UAB news. 
2018 2019 Co Chief ResidentsIt is with great pleasure that we announce the selection of Drs. Jamie Powell, Robert (Rob) Sellers, and Karlene Walker as Pediatric Co-Chief Residents for the 2018-2019 academic year.

We greatly appreciate the input and recommendations from faculty and residents in this difficult selection process. It is clear that Jamie, Rob, and Karlene have the admiration and respect of our residents, fellows, and faculty and will serve as strong leaders for our residency programs.
 
Please join us in extending congratulations to Jamie, Rob and Karlene!
The New York Times named The Magic City as one of its 52 Places to Go in 2017! Find Birmingham, Alabama at #45 in the NYT bucket list.
Click here to see the article highlight Birmingham's revitalization and find things to do around the world. 
Matthew Kutny, M.D., Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, has been appointed to the NIH National Cancer Institute (NCI) Physician Data Query (PDQ) Pediatric Treatment Editorial Advisory Board. The NCI provides evidence-based cancer information summaries for health professionals and the public on the NCI’s website: http://www.cancer.gov. These PDQ summaries are available for the treatment of children and adults, cancer genetics, screening, prevention, supportive and palliative care, and integrative, alternative and complementary therapies. The summaries are created and maintained by Editorial Boards and the content is then reviewed and edited by advisory boards consisting of national experts in that field. Dr. Kutny was selected to the advisory board for the NCI’s recommendations for “Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies Treatment."
A new study from the UAB Department of Pediatrics shows that national magazine advertisements and manufacturers of infant cribs continue to depict unsafe sleep environments, despite longtime guidelines established by the American Academy of Pediatrics to protect against SIDS and other sleep-related deaths.

The study published in Pediatrics, “Safe Sleep Guideline Adherence in Nationwide Marketing of Infant Cribs and Products,” analyzed 1,758 crib advertisements and 1,893 print magazine advertisements from 1992, 2010 and 2015.

Investigators on the study include Brad Troxler, M.D., assistant professor and director of the UAB Pediatric Pulmonary Center , Matthew Kreth, M.D., former fellow in UAB’s Department of Pediatrics; Tammy Shikany, RT, respiratory therapist in the UAB PPC; and Claire Lenker, LICSW, CCM, clinical social worker in the UAB PPC. 

To continue reading the UAB Press Release click here. In addition, this publication picked up press coverage from numerous national and local outlets including: MedPageNews MedicalYahooHealth DayCBS News and many more. 
A study recently published by Smita Bhatia, M.D., MPH, Pediatric Hematology & Oncology,  and Julie Wolfson, M.D., MSHS, Pediatric Hematology & Oncology, addresses the impact of care at comprehensive cancer centers. See the study here

Kaiser Health News interviewed Dr. Wolfson to give her input on access to Cancer Centers in a changing marketplace plan environment. To read the article, click the following links: Kaiser Health NewsNPR, and CNNMoney.