Experts Guide
UAB’s public relations specialists are the fastest, most efficient way for reporters to reach UAB experts on deadline. Call 205-934-3884.

We also have a full-service broadcast team that can facilitate interviews for TV, radio or Skype and provide b-roll or sound on request. Search by topic or name to find featured experts or contact Public Relations for additional information.
Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
"One of the great barriers to addressing this problem is that sometimes people are a little embarrassed about asking to be checked for sexually transmitted infections. I think we need to get over that."

Peter Waite, DDS, M.D.

Oral Surgery • Impacted teeth • Dental implants • Orthognathic surgery • Craniofacial cleft lip/palate surgery • Facial reconstruction • Cosmetic surgery • Obstructive sleep apnea • Facial cosmetic surgery

Sadis Matalon, Ph.D.

Lung injury • Effects of chlorine and other harmful gases to the lung

William Carroll, M.D.

Head and neck oncology  • Transoral robotic surgery (TORS)

Thanks to the discovery of a rare genetic condition and the skill of UAB surgeons, Brad Martin now has a better future.
It would be used to treat two rare forms of epilepsy Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome. They are among the most difficult types of epilepsy to treat.
Scientists believe this species existed in the Late Cretaceous period, approximately 100 to 66 million years ago.
“Respect is critical,” Jeanne M. Marrazzo, MD, MPH, professor and director of the division of infectious diseases at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “Part of that is honoring the patient’s wishes that pertain to their identity. Names and pronouns get to the core of that.”
The results are promising but surgeons are watching for more evidence that such a big, and expensive, change in organ storage is worthwhile — and if so, when best to use it, said Dr. Devin Eckhoff, transplant division director at the University of Alabama at Birmingham
A sea turtle discovered in Alabama is a new species from the Late Cretaceous epoch, according to a study published April 18, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Drew Gentry from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Alabama, USA, and colleagues.
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