Best of 2014 2If successful, the PRESERVE-1 trial could be a significant clinical breakthrough in the treatment of the condition by prolonging pregnancy and improving outcomes.
Sixteen clinical centers and 30 hospitals will enroll up to 5,700 pregnant women to evaluate the benefits and harms of pharmacologic treatment of mild chronic hypertension in pregnancy.
National and international groups select UAB research paper as the year’s best basic science paper for research into urgency urinary incontinence.
Published in Updates
The award is presented to a department whose faculty, fellows or residents published one of the most outstanding journal articles in Obstetrics and Gynecology.
Published in Faculty Excellence
UAB’s Continence and Urogynecology Care Clinics reaccredited — were the nation’s first to earn an NAFC Center of Excellence designation, in 2010
Published in Focus on Patient Care
Early registration ends Jan. 31 for The Bruce A. Harris Symposium: Progress in OB/GYN 2014 for Physicians and Nurses to be held 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Feb. 20-21 in The Wynfrey Hotel at Riverchase Galleria.

More than 5,000 people responded to the magazines’ online survey and entered the businesses and services they thought were the best in 81 categories.

Published in Focus on Patient Care

Huh holds appointments in the Center for AIDS Research and the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Published in Faculty Excellence

Straughn first joined UAB in 2000.

Published in Faculty Excellence

Strong Start for Mothers and Newborns provides non-medical social services for healthy living and better pregnancy outcomes for Medicaid, CHIP-eligible patients.

Published in Focus on Patient Care

UAB Hospital will work towards international "Baby-Friendly" designation.

Published in Focus on Patient Care

Researchers at UAB were part of a team that revealed genetic differences that influence a person's level of sex hormones.

UAB professor will lead the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons.

Published in Faculty Excellence

Ronald Alvarez, M.D., a leader in the research and treatment of ovarian and cervical cancers, is president of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology.

Published in Focus on Patient Care

There are physiological reasons why pregnant women feel the heat more than others; the key, for comfort and safety, is to keep cool.

Published in Focus on Patient Care
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