Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
"Realizing that females likely process pain differently than males will allow us to focus on creating alternate pain therapies for each sex," said researcher Robert Sorge, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology in UAB's College of Arts and Sciences.
Most current estimates suggest that 10 percent of all eating disorders occur in males, but at least one study from Harvard University suggests that the real figure may be closer to 25 percent.
hat plan reaches for excellence in the dental educational experience, enhances its diversity, broadens its capacity to help others in communities throughout the state, and adds to its degree, certificate, and fellowship programs.
Placebo research sounds like an oxymoron. Placebos are the stooges of medicine, the character in any clinical trial that everyone is rooting against. But they also have some remarkable properties.
he majority of existing research shows that men and women have different sensitivity to pain, with women being more sensitive to pain overall, but the assumption has always been that a common pain circuit exists in both sexes that is altered by circulating hormones such as estrogen.
Magnolias are prized for their large, colorful, fragrant flowers. Does the attractive, showy tree also harbor a potent cancer fighter? Yes, according to a growing number of studies, including one from VA and the University of Alabama at Birmingham that is now online in the journal Oncotarget.
Over the past decade, cancer programs have made major investments in patient navigation, yet few have been able to demonstrate a measurable impact on the quality and cost of care. That’s why we were excited to see a preliminary study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) showing the impact of their lay navigation program on health care utilization and costs.
"Because our observations were limited to a four-week period, we are not sure whether neurodegeneration associated with α-synuclein is truly prevented or just delayed," senior author Andrew West, Ph.D., and colleagues wrote. "Either way, any interruption of neurodegeneration associated with Parkinson's disease might represent a significant therapeutic advance."
"Caring for our eyesight should be a priority year-round, but there are extra precautions that should be taken during the summertime," said Adam Gordon, O.D., MPH, FAAO, clinical associate professor in the UAB School of Optometry.
The first test in a mammalian model of a potential new class of drugs to treat Parkinson’s disease shows abatement of neurodegeneration in the brains of test rats and no significant toxicities.
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