Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
The "Fagbug," a Volkswagen Beetle featured in the documentary film, "Fagbug Nation," will be on display at The UAB Campus Green on Wednesday from noon-3 p.m. as part of Out Week. Filmmaker Erin Davies will appear at a screening of the film on campus on Wednesday night. (Photo by Wikimedia user Jason Lawrence.)
When thinking about measures to prevent fluid overload, it’s important to remember that fluid is a drug with a therapeutic window, and that dosing rates should be individualized to the goals of therapy, the clinical scenario and the severity of illness, noted David Askenazi, MD, the director of the Pediatric and Infant Center for Acute Nephrology, Children’s of Alabama/University of Alabama at Birmingham.
“In general, the presence of the fever doesn’t mean that patient X needs to be admitted,” said Dr. David Pigott of the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “It is a mark of infection.
"We are in an extremely difficult time right now psychologically," said Josh Klapow, associate professor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health. "What you're dealing with is how to separate rational, productive worry from irrational unproductive worry."
From the Wall Street Journal
David Pigott, professor of emergency medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, said he suspects that “if we see any significant number of new cases,” such patients will likely be transferred to special centers designated to treat Ebola cases. Four institutions, including Emory University in Atlanta, Nebraska Medical Center, St. Patrick’s Hospital in Missoula, Mont., and an National Institutes of Health facility, have special biocontainment units.

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have taken an in-depth look at patterns in pediatric sports-related injuries in a new study published in the Journal of Athletic Training.
In the wake of news that a Dallas nurse is infected with Ebola, Alabama  Gov. Robert Bentley toured UAB Hospital today to continue the message he started last week: that Alabama hospitals are prepared to handle the Ebola virus.
Over the next few weeks, venues large and small will present electronica artists, jam bands, country performers, heavy-metal groups, hip-hop acts, folk singers and more.
The day's discussion focused on balancing the benefit of oral anticoagulation compared with its bleeding risk and the stroke risks that may be elevated in the Watchman device group.
The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has received nearly $14 million in research funding from the race since 2003, according to the organization's web site.
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