Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
A few extra pounds might do more than test the strength of that belt around your waist, a small study suggests: You could also boost your blood pressure slightly, even if you gain just 5 percent of your body weight.
People who don’t have Medicaid or other health care coverage rarely visit primary care doctors and aren’t getting tested for HIV, according to Michael Saag, a professor and HIV/AIDS researcher with the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine. “That’s a large group of people who have HIV and don’t know it,” he said.
From Clinical Endocrinology News
The extended release tablets (Contrave; Orexigen and Takeda) are approved for use in adults who have a body mass index of at least 30 kg/m2, or those with a BMI of at least 27 kg/m2 and at least one additional weight-related condition such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, or dyslipidemia. The agency recommended that Contrave be used in addition to caloric restriction and increased physical activity.

"Twitch" – a documentary film that follows an 18-year-old as she is tested for the degenerative genetic disease that killed her mother – will be screened at The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) today.
So will all types of weight gain boost blood pressure? Probably not, said Donna Arnett, a past president of the American Heart Association and the chair of epidemiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health. "Excess intake of foods rich in potassium like fruits and vegetables or dairy could lower blood pressure," she said. "Processed foods high in sodium could lead to greater blood pressure increases."
But what, you may be wondering, does the future hold for mobile app development? Relax — we've got you covered. Or actually, our friends at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Collat School of Business have you covered.
To support communication between doctors and patients, UAB Medicine in Birmingham, Ala., has deployed interactive post-discharge phone calls and corresponding multimedia programs to improve care transitions and reduce readmission rates.
“Based on clinical data, peramivir is the first neuraminidase inhibitor that has shown to be safe and effective as a single-dose therapy for patients with acute, uncomplicated influenza,” Rich Whitley, a professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the presenting author of the study, said.
The risk of developing herpes zoster was similar among older patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with the various different biologic agents, a retrospective study found.
Complicated CAPTCHAs can keep you from logging in to websites protected by those annoying squiggly letters. Thankfully, researchers have found a new way to let you in while keeping the spam bots out.
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