Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
A new report demonstrates that clinical and genetic factors affecting dose requirements for warfarin vary by race.
A new study shows that injuries related to wearing high-heel shoes doubled from 2002 to 2012.
When someone's heart is severely damaged doctors may be able to implant a mechanical pump, sometimes as a permanent assist to the heart or as a temporary measure until transplant.
A new report demonstrates that clinical and genetic factors affecting dose requirements for warfarin vary by race. The study proposes race-specific equations to help clinicians better calculate warfarin dosage.
Three students from Alabama's Seventh Congressional District will begin internships today in the Washington, D.C., office of U.S. Rep. Terri Sewell (D-Birmingham) with funding provided by the non-profit group The 7th Project.
From Health Medicine Network
Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have identified a chemical pathway that may be associated with seizures and shorter patient survival in some patients with malignant glioma, the most common and deadly form of brain tumor. In findings published May 27 in Science Translational Medicine, the researchers suggest that a transporter known as SXC is responsible for boosting levels of glutamate in the brains of some glioma patients.
A chemical pathway that may be associated with seizures and shorter patient survival in some patients with malignant glioma, the most common and deadly form of brain tumor, has been identified by researchers.
MedPage Today invited specialists from leading medical institutions to weigh in on the latest advancements in hepatitis C with one question each day for 10 days. Hear what E. Turner Overton, MD, associate professor of medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, had to say.
Campus wellness centers integrate services for the mind and body, creating a one-stop-shop for student health needs.
Turns out your shoes can be a real pain in the neck, and the shoulders, and the knees: Injuries from wearing high heels have doubled since 2002, according to a new study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
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