Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
The grand opening celebration for Hill Student Center will be Jan. 20.
A lack of basic writing skills is a problem faced by many of Lawson’s peers across the country, in part, due to living in a world of text messaging and Twitter shorthand. But a collaboration between Parker High School and the University of Alabama at Birmingham is addressing writing skills and college readiness.
“We have increasingly become aware that the disruption of blood flow in the brain can increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease,” lead researcher Dr. Erik Roberson, an associate professor of neurology.
Not long after former UAB star and then-Illinois State assistant Torrey Ward was killed in a plane crash, Blazers head coach Jerod Haase and his staff would see reminders of respect for Ward at recruiting events.
Experts say they do not know whether efforts to prevent diabetes have finally started to work, or if the disease has simply peaked in the population.
If it remains very high over time with multiple measurements, there is no mistaking the diagnosis of hypertension.
Scientific breakthroughs can change the world—but only if they can break out of the lab first. Students in UAB’s biotechnology master’s program capitalize on UAB discoveries by translating them into new medical treatments and potential start-up companies. See how a mix of scientific knowledge and business sense helps them do it.
A drug that might help older adults regrow muscle is under investigation at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. UAB is recruiting healthy adults age 65 and older for a study combining strength training exercise with the anti-diabetes drug metformin.
Buildup of the amyloid beta protein clumps could harm the brain in multiple ways, according to a team from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
They suggest people with other types of infections and identical gene mutations also may be prone to the disorder, known as reactive HLH (rHLH), or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.
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