Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

| This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
Researchers are now investigating more sophisticated methods of gleaning clinical information from the eyes, and the results are showing promise for eventual application in aiding diagnosis and informing treatment.
“In this series of baby boomers presenting to the ED, we observed a high prevalence of unrecognized chronic HCV infection,” the UAB researchers concluded. “These results highlight the ED as an important venue for HCV screening and linkage to care.”
The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) announced that it was recently added to the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation’s Care Center Network. The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF) selected 12 new sites to be added to the 9 centers previously selected in 2013.
Some babies may be genetically predisposed to being born too soon, and variants in the DNA of the fetus -- not the mother -- may be the trigger for some early births.
The number of residents at teaching hospitals rose slightly in 2013, the last full year before the fiscal 2015 federal budget cut $960 million from graduate medical education support, according to data compiled by Modern Healthcare.

Associate professor of theatre, head of performance

Areas of expertise: acting, directing

stream UNP Brain Infographic 900A unique program at UAB has linked undergraduate students with more than 80 top neuroscience research mentors, many located on UAB’s medical campus.
Many persons with asthma are also allergic to common fungi and mold, and a reaction to those allergens can exacerbate asthma symptoms. Researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham have received a $1.75 million, four-year grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, one of the National Institutes of Health, to better understand how a fungal reaction affects asthma and to search for ways to interfere in that process and reduce the severity of fungal asthma.
In collaboration with an international team of researchers, scientists at the University of Alabama at Birmingham in the U.S. have discovered the basis of Singleton–Merten syndrome (SMS). SMS is an infrequently described autosomal dominant disorder causing early and extreme heart calcification, as well as dental anomalies, such as early-onset periodontitis and root resorption of the teeth in affected patients, among other conditions.
As January, the universally acknowledged month of 'doing something about your weight' comes to a close we have some good and bad news for dieters out there.
Back to Top