Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
Construction is nearly complete on the $10 million project at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Health System entity. The 64,000-square-foot renovation involves the third and fourth floors of the John N. Whitaker Building. The expansion also includes a connector bridge.
James McClintock, a marine biologist, talks with David Greene about how warming temperatures have had a dramatic impact on the glacier near the U.S. Palmer Station in Antarctica.
A person born with one abnormal copy of the gene for the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells, known as sickle cell trait, does not have sickle cell disease but is two times more likely to develop kidney failure requiring dialysis, according to a new study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
"Previous studies have shown that eating earlier in the day may help with weight loss and lower the risk of developing diabetes and heart disease. What this new study shows is that our biological clocks not only affect our metabolism but also what we choose to eat."
A great place to work… again: UAB Medicine has been named one of the “150 Great Places to Work in Healthcare” by Becker’s Hospital Review.
University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have discovered that endostatin, a naturally occurring protein in humans, can significantly decrease proliferation of castration-resistant prostate cells in culture, and in a recent paper in The FASEB Journal, they describe the physiological pathways and signaling evoked by endostatin.
“Early birds may have an extra advantage over night owls when it comes to fighting obesity as they are instinctively choosing to eat healthier foods earlier in the day,” Courtney Peterson of the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

"Ranked among the best medical centers in the nation, UAB serves countless individuals from Alabama, the nation, and from around the globe. By working endlessly to drive clinical program specialization and expansion, I believe we're building a program primed for success," said Herbert Chen, M.D.

The reason the task force, CDC and other medical groups now recommend widespread testing is that treatment has improved dramatically over the past few years, said Michael Saag, a professor of medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and a spokesperson for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.
“The new building will provide modern teaching facilities and technologies, larger classrooms, and it will be a safe and secure space for students to learn and for faculty to conduct their scholarship and research.”
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