Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
In research presented at the European Symposium on Research in Computer Security (ESORICS) in Vienna, Austria, the UAB team warmed that people could inadvertently leave voice samples as part of daily life.
The University of Alabama at Birmingham will soon be offering internal medicine and pediatric health care services in Leeds and surrounding areas when its new clinic opens Oct. 21.
Efforts to reduce health disparities related to uncontrolled high blood pressure among African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, and low-income and rural individuals got a boost today with the announcement of $23.5 million for two new studies.
University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have found that automated and human verification for voice-based user authentication systems are vulnerable to voice impersonation attacks. This new research is being presented at the European Symposium on Research in Computer Security, or ESORICS, today in Vienna, Austria.
Register today for UAB’s annual Critical Care Symposium.
On Wednesday, Sept. 23, the Grammy winners will return to Birmingham with a performance at the Alys Stephens Center.
The visually stunning results are on display at Abroms-Engel Institute for the Visual Arts on the UAB campus.
Researchers at UAB found that patients aged younger than 65 who were unmarried, lived in lower-income areas, and who were uninsured or Medicaid beneficiaries were at significantly higher risk of premature mortality.
From Nasdaq.com
"This study was designed to take repeated blood samples from patients over time to determine the sensitivity of T2Candida compared to blood culture for monitoring patients on antifungal therapy," said Peter Pappas, M.D., FACP, professor of medicine, division of infectious diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham and principal investigator of the study.
Carmen de Miguel, Ph.D., from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and colleagues examined whether obesity would lead to different circulating T-lymphocyte profiles and activation status in Caucasian and African-American adolescents.
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