Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
"It's not very often that a new therapy comes along that has as much potential as this new, leadless pacemaker does," said Vance Plumb, M.D., professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiovascular Disease in the School of Medicine. "Historically, the weak link causing failure of pacing has been the leads, which this device eliminates. It's a big step forward in patient treatment and a milestone for cardiac rhythm treatment in Alabama."
Louis Brunsting, M.D, associate professor of surgery and chief of the Section of Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Massoud Leesar, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the Section of Interventional Cardiology, modified the procedure to take place over three days instead of all at one time to decrease the risk of bleeding a patient could endure due to blood-thinning medication taken prior to the stenting procedure.
Approved by University of Alabama System Board of Trustees last week, UAB is creating the Personalized Medicine Institute, the Institute for Informatics and the UAB-HudsonAlpha Center for Genomic Medicine.
The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) announced Tuesday it will establish a new Institute for Human Rights, one that school officials say can build on the Magic City's increasing reputation as a center for the study of civil rights and social justice.
In a world where getting that first job out of college is no easy task, Suzanne Scott-Trammell, executive director of career and professional development at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, said internships are critical.
Methotrexate -- the inexpensive anchor drug for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis -- isn't being used optimally today, with few patients switching from the oral to the subcutaneous formulation or adding a second conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) before turning to a biologic, researchers found.
Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have shed new light on how cells called gliomas migrate in the brain and cause devastating tumors. The findings, published June 19, 2014 in Nature Communications, show that gliomas — malignant glial cells — disrupt normal neural connections and hijack control of blood vessels.
The University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine and the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology are teaming to form the Center for Genomic Medicine.
Organizers of the new Institute for Human Rights at The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) have expressed the hope that it will help attract world-class teachers, researchers and students who passionate about human and civil rights.
A study in the July issue of Anesthesiology revealed that patients who receive a simple, multicolor, standardized medication instruction sheet before surgery are more likely to comply with their physician's instructions and experience a significantly shorter post-op stay in recovery.
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