Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
A team of researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham say using sea urchin waste to feed shrimp helped the crustaceans grow faster, bigger, healthier and even tastier than using traditional food—and the process is more sustainable, as well.
University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have conducted a study that provides new insights on users’ susceptibility to, and capability to detect, cyber-criminal attacks such as malware and phishing attacks.
The three-year agreement provides students from the School of Engineering opportunities to closely examine and study the applications for thermoplastic fiber-reinforced polymer in a vehicle’s suspension system with access to accredited professionals.
Southern historian Glenn Feldman wrote 11 books that made him one of the most serious scholars on race and politics in the South.
Scientists have discovered that one species can feed another from its waste. This finding could “hold the key to unlocking future breakthroughs in environmental science, business and medicine.”
Using sea urchins and shrimp as models, UAB scientists discovered that one species could feed another from its waste, without needing to use traditional food at all.
There is some prior knowledge on this topic regarding users' performance in these security tasks, but UAB's research took the work to the next level by studying users in a near-reality setting and evaluating more than one neurophysiological measure during a single study.
In a landmark step - after 19 years of research by Irshad Chaudry, Ph.D. - the University of Alabama at Birmingham has received a $10 million U.S. Department of Defense contract funded by the Combat Casualty Care Research Program, US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick MD, to begin testing its potentially life-saving synthetic estrogen for safety in humans.
Throughout the day, students at UAB's Dental School worked alongside faculty members and dentists from the community to clean, remove or fill the teeth of about 550 patients at all three sites.
In the past year, UAB has attracted more high-achieving freshmen than ever before, fostered a student body focused on diversity and academic prowess, raised more money than ever, and continued plans to build new facilities.
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