Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
Clinical trials are underway at the University of Alabama at Birmingham to treat cavities with resin. The process is called resin infiltration and it allows the dentist to slide a perforated plastic sheet between the teeth with the cavities and fill it with resin.
Resin infiltration allows the dentist to slide a plastic perforated sheet between the teeth with the cavities.

Normally, dentists drill away at a tooth to access any cavities to then fill them in. But the new treatment involves sliding a sheet between the teeth and cavities. Called resin infiltration, drilling isn't needed and it can be done without numbing. And experts now say the system, currently under trial, could be a game-changer.

“It kind of makes sense,” said Courtney Peterson, lead author of the study and an assistant professor in the Department of Nutrition Sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “Your body’s fat-burning ability peaks after you’ve been fasting for 12 to 14 hours.”
The study found that when participants consumed all of their calories within a 6-hour window, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., they burned 6 percent more fat and had more stable hunger levels than participants who consumed the same amount of calories within a 12-hour window, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
The results of a joint research program from the UAB Sports Medicine Concussion Clinic, UAB’s Vestibular and Oculomotor Research Laboratory, and UABs School of Engineering are being shared with VICIS, a start-up sports equipment company that is reengineering the American football helmet, called ZERO1.
Construction is under way for a new $37.5 million project at the University of Alabama at Birmingham to house the Collat School of Business and Bill L. Harbert Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.
A new University of Alabama at Birmingham study shows that, when older cancer patients were paired with trained nonmedical professionals in the form of 'lay navigators,' there was significant decline in health care resource utilization and Medicare costs, providing an innovative model in transitioning to value-based health care on a national scale.
$1 Million was awarded to Parcak, last year, for her initiative to embrace technology and innovation inside an age-old industry, archaeology.
A big pink check for $875,000 was presented by the Birmingham-based organization. The donation includes sales from the specialty breast cancer research license plate, BCRFA events and individual and community donations.
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