Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
Efforts by The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) to continue to improve amenities for a growing student population are getting another boost.
After spending three years as the senior vice president for finance and administration and COO of the Medical College of Wisconsin, Glen Allen Bolton will return to the University of Alabama at Birmingham to serve as the vice president for financial affairs and administration starting Oct. 1.
Surgeons at University of Alabama at Birmingham successfully used an alternative to open heart surgery. The noninvasive procedure is used for high risk patients. It is already being done in hospitals in Europe and Canada but has yet to gain FDA approval. However, a clinical trial is underway in the United States.
Mice that begin expressing a mutant version of a protein called neurexin at 2 weeks of age develop autism-like behaviors that researchers can erase weeks or months later. The report, published 24 July in Cell Reports, suggests that it may be possible to treat autism symptoms even in adulthood.
With one Ebola patient here in the United States – the first time an infected Ebola victim has been on American soil – and another Ebola patient soon to arrive in Atlanta, some people are understandably concerned about containing a virus that kills 9 of 10 people contracting it.
It's time to send the kids back to school, and experts at The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) offer tips to help both students and parents get the year off to a good start.
Harvest for Health, conducted by the University of Alabama at Birmingham, is a yearlong study that will pair cancer survivors over the age of 60 in the Montgomery area with local master gardeners to see if gardening will improve the survivor’s diet and health, as well as their physical fitness and functioning.
The first of the infected medical missionaries will be flown into Atlanta to begin treatment Saturday, but bringing someone with the Ebola virus into the States has created an internet storm of concerns - could the virus be spread in the U.S.? And how is it spread? A UAB physician has been studying the virus and answers our questions.
Mamie Martin is participating in the UAB study Harvest for Health, which pairs cancer survivors with master gardeners from the Alabama Cooperative Extension System. The master gardeners help the cancer survivors grow vegetable gardens. The purpose is to see if a cancer survivor eats better with fresh vegetables at their disposal and if they see improvement in physical function and overall health as they tend to their garden.
New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases shows consuming a "Southern-style" diet -- consisting of processed meats, fried foods and sugar-sweetened beverages -- results in higher risk of death in those with chronic kidney disease.
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