Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
They suggest people with other types of infections and identical gene mutations also may be prone to the disorder, known as reactive HLH (rHLH), or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.
A UAB/Children’s of Alabama/Cincinnati Children’s study finds genetic risk for fatal inflammatory disorder linked to viral infection.
Fond memories of chemotherapy nurses make 15-year-old Pell City High School student want to become one.
When Brad Spencer, CEO of Blondin Bioscience, a University of Alabama at Birmingham-related startup, called to let us know he was ready to apply for accounting compliance assistance through the Alabama Launchpad Phase 0 program, you could hear the excitement in his voice.
Citing a study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Health Professions, the task force found that expanding Medicaid would provide coverage for 290,000 Alabamians, including 185,000 who are currently employed.
A collaboration between Pillay’s lab and the animal care specialists at the Birmingham Zoo found one: a composite fiberglass and carbon fiber band and resin, which looks and acts like a permanent plaster cast.
In the past, when elephants have cracked their tusks, steel bands encircle the fissure to keep the tooth together — which is what the zoo asked Brian Pillay, a University of Alabama at Birmingham engineer to do.
Mechanical engineering professor Dean Sicking has set up shop at Barber Motorsports Park to test different kinds of impact on equipment for the first time using crash test dummies.
When Bulwagi’s veterinarians asked University of Alabama at Birmingham scientist Brian Pillay to machine a ring, Pillay decided instead to tackle the problem with materials science. He designed an industrial-strength composite material to act like a brace—a lighter, stronger way to stabilize the crack.
Start with satellite cells. These are stem cells within your muscles that provide extra nuclei, giving them a more powerful growth stimulus.
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