Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 

A professor within the School of Optometry at the University of Alabama at Birmingham will begin new research on a deadly form of bacteria that can be passed from healthy women to their infants during birth.

The University of Alabama at Birmingham and the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology in Huntsville announced last month a partnership to use the study of human genes, known as genomics, to improve modern medicine.

When there was trouble with a heart transplant, Dr. Jim Caulfield knew why. UAB Hospital would call him in to study the heart tissue and determine if the patient was rejecting the transplant.

For a $25 service fee, patients can use the site to answer questions about their symptoms and a doctor will respond within an hour during business hours.

The University of Alabama at Birmingham Medicine has just launched a new program that leverages technology to educate patients on their health condition and lower readmission rates.

The UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center and HudsonAlpha will rely on a combination of new research, clinical applications and joint recruiting with the ultimate goal of reducing disparities in cancer outcomes among different demographic groups.

UAB professor, Dr. Peter King, has a reason for taking the challenge. He studies ALS and treats patients suffering from the disease.

It happens most every night. Your head hits the pillow and consciousness wanes. Remembered or not, bizarre and fantastical worlds are likely to flood the brain, all while your eyes are closed. 

From Birmingham Medical News
Michael Saag, MD came to Birmingham in 1981 to begin his residency in internal medicine at UAB with plans become a cardiologist. A few days after arriving in the city, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control reported eight cases of “unusual opportunistic infections” in gay men. The discovery of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) soon sent Saag down a career path he never imagined.
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