Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
Many of us grab coffee and a quick bite in the morning and eat more as the day goes on, with a medium-size lunch and the largest meal of the day in the evening. But a growing body of research on weight and health suggests we may be doing it all backward.
A paper describing the findings by a team of researchers at Penn State University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham appears in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
With this grant from the NIH, researchers at UAB will be able to test the influence of age and driving experience on driving attention development.
"Being prepared when traveling is key to eye safety," said Dr. Andrew Pucker, an associate professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry.
“One of the things that led me to take the role were great leaders from the community like Alabama Power, Regions Bank, UAB, the Community Foundation and the BBA who stepped forward and said we want to take a hard view of technology-based economic development and really turn it into an economic development strategy that creates predictable, repeatable and sustainable results.”
The new Commercialization Accelerator will be a key component of the university’s plan to attract innovators within the university, help them refine and develop their ideas and connect them to the city’s larger innovation ecosystem to grow and mature.
By capturing the crystal structure of RNA polymerase during a nontraditional form of transcription -- reiterative transcription -- researchers have identified a new pathway used by RNA to exit an enzyme.
University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have created a small molecule that prevents or impedes tooth cavities in a preclinical model.
Biomedical engineering researchers will attack two banes of cardiovascular disease — heart failure after heart attacks and the scourge of resistant high blood pressure — with $4.8 million in National Institutes of Health grants that begin this fall.
Ray Hayes has served as Chancellor of the University of Alabama System for just under a year. He has quickly established himself as an able leader of one of the state’s most important economic engines.
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