Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
The MITRE Corporation has chosen the universities that will advise the first federally funded research and development center (FFRDC) that is exclusively dedicated to cybersecurity.
Birmingham is preparing for a visit this weekend from the Dalai Lama. The Tibetan leader will speak about religion and human rights. But the Buddhist figure will also indulge his personal interest of neuroscience. The Dalai Lama will participate in a talk with scientists Saturday at UAB.
An appearance by the Dalai Lama at The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) today for a scientific symposium drew hundreds of people -- including his supporters and some protesters -- to campus near the Alys Stephens Center.
Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dala Lama, appeared in Alabama for the first time Saturday, meeting with three renowned neuroscientists at UAB's Alys Stephens Center to discuss "Neuroplasticity and Healing."
With Ebola still a pressing concern in emergency rooms across the country, a Chicago medical conference this week aims to educate physicians about treating patients and protecting themselves.
His Holiness sat down with UAB scientists and other leading experts to talk about groundbreaking research into the healing power of the brain.
Before 1980, it was widely accepted as fact in neuroscience that the central nervous system is hardwired and fixed. The very strong belief was that after an injury in adults, such as stroke or traumatic brain injury, the brain cannot repair itself.
First seen in California, then in Colorado, cases of acute flaccid myelitis marked by strikingly consistent MRI evidence of gray matter damage in the spinal cord are now believed to be affecting children in multiple states across the United States, according to neurologists tracking the outbreak.
According to Bruce Korf, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the department of genetics, and director of the Heflin Center for Genomic Sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, the glut of genetic information that will be used to inform treatment decisions will require additional education of clinicians, especially since a sizable cohort received their genetics training before the genomic age.
"If someone has hepatitis C and does not know it, it could be doing damage to their liver," says Michael Saag, MD, professor of medicine and director of the Center for AIDS Research at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He is also co-chair of the Infectious Diseases Society of America's HCV Guidance panel.
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