Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
The Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is currently forming a plan to attract more investors into university research enterprises that could lead to more jobs and spinoff companies in Birmingham.
New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham finds genetic variants that occur in nature and lay the groundwork for future studies of diseases and treatments in humans.
In 2012, the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center created the Patient Care Connect Program, a lay patient navigation initiative with the support of a $15 million Health Care Innovation Challenge Grant Award from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation with the aim of achieving better health and better health care at a lower cost.
UAB investigators are part of the LIBERATE Study, examining whether the one-way valves help improve lung function in patients with severe emphysema.
How does a doctor diagnose something they've never seen before? One answer comes in the form of online tool VisualDx, a website and app used by medics to solve clinical conundrums — in real-time.
UAB presented an observational study at this week’s annual American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago that indicates a more rapid decline in Medicare costs and patient resource utilization during implementation of a lay navigation program.
John Jones III has been named the University of Alabama at Birmingham's vice president for Student Affairs.
The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) Oncology Research Program (ORP) is collaborating with Pfizer Independent Grants for Learning & Change (IGLC) to establish a peer-reviewed grant program to elicit proposals focused on health care provider performance and/or health care quality improvement and education projects.
A study of the rapid evolution of the insulin-signaling molecular network that regulates growth, reproduction, metabolism and aging lays important groundwork for future studies.
Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) say developing hypertension, even if it is eventually controlled with medication, significantly increases the chance of having a stroke.
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