Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
An interdisciplinary team from the University of Alabama at Birmingham which works to unravel how the body’s immune system contributes to the development and progression of the pathology in the brain of PD patients, was the first to reveal that disruption of the JAK/STAT pathway using inhibitors commonly called Jakinibs, prevented the neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration seen in PD patients.
A treatment used for depression, Parkinson’s disease and autism shows promise to alleviate obesity in binge-eating disorder patients. tDCS is a type of neuromodulator that delivers constant, low-current electricity to a targeted portion of the brain.
A team of researchers recently discovered this when they used drones to study population densities of endangered Kemp’s ridley sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico. By accident, they also ended up documenting the courtship rituals of a different species, green turtles—the first time this has been done with this technology.
Renovations to the University of Alabama at Birmingham's Alys Stephens Performing Arts Center have begun as the center prepares to celebrate its 20th anniversary.
Vulcan Solar Power has been selected by the University of Alabama at Birmingham for construction of a commercial-scale solar facility. The solar project is the first undertaken by the university.
How long are your eyes really off the road if you're snapping a selfie or sending a quick text from behind the wheel?
Human trafficking is the world’s fastest-growing criminal industry, ensnaring 20-plus million people in modern slavery — even in Birmingham. UAB Honors College students investigate the problem’s economic, social, political and psychological roots to separate fact from fiction.
Understanding how people respond to aspirin is key in terms of knowing who will benefit from it.
Inmates at a U.S. jail who'd used LSD, mushrooms or ecstasy were less likely to commit acts of domestic violence after release, researchers report.
The city will give the UAB football program five yearly installments of $500,000 each.
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