Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
New research published in Epilepsia, a journal of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), suggests that an investigational neurological treatment derived from cannabis may alter the blood levels of commonly used antiepileptic drugs. It is important for clinicians to consider such drug interactions during treatment of complex conditions.
The participants are also taking other seizure drugs while they are receiving the investigational therapy, investigators checked the blood levels of their other seizure drugs to see if they changed. “With any new potential seizure medication, it is important to know if drug interactions exist and if there are labs that should be monitored while taking a specific medication,” said lead author Dr Tyler Gaston.
Too often, people don’t want to lock guns because they don’t think accidents will happen and they want their firearms immediately available and ready to use, said David Schwebel of the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
It’s an urgent problem, with the forecast that about one-fifth of the world’s population will be obese in less than 10 years.
August has “all ingredients for a stew of blues,” said Joshua Klapow, a clinical psychologist and associate professor in the School of Public Health at The University of Alabama at Birmingham.
And when a high-visibility sport is suddenly gone, a jarring sense of loss fills the void. The absence is felt not only by the students who couldn't play football, but also by a school trying to grow, a community trying to repair its reputation — and everyone touched by both.
After being shut down in December of 2014, the UAB Football program fought to get reinstated in 2015. Since then, the program has undergone significant changes in their run to #TheReturn in 2017. Head Coach Bill Clark and former players return to the program and document the journey and bond to the city and school that embraced their revival.
The transition from summer break back to school can be tough for everyone; but for families of children with special needs, Jennifer Kilgo, Ph.D., professor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Education, says concerns about the back-to-school transition can be even more intensified.
What do fake NBA jerseys, black-market pills, and other people’s bank data have in common? They’re all available through cybercrime, and they’ve all been tracked by high school students learning to help catch the criminals at a weeklong camp at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
Eye specialists from the University of Alabama at Birmingham offer tips on eye safety during the eclipse to avoid post-exposure symptoms like pain, red eyes, light sensitivity, tearing or watery eyes, blurry vision, and many others.
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