Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
This is a significant and timely advancement in identifying and tracking these PFASs, which are known to be harmful to the human body, and just last month were found to be used extensively in fast-food wrapping paper at many popular chain restaurants.
While artificial lens implants are a successful way of treating congenital cataracts, the unaffected eye needs special attention, too.
The journal's new name, Nelle, pays tribute to Pulitzer Prize-winning author Nelle Harper Lee.
The funding is to help improve the health of underserved communities across the country by increasing access to quality primary health care services.
Construction is nearly complete on the $10 million project at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Health System entity. The 64,000-square-foot renovation involves the third and fourth floors of the John N. Whitaker Building. The expansion also includes a connector bridge.
James McClintock, a marine biologist, talks with David Greene about how warming temperatures have had a dramatic impact on the glacier near the U.S. Palmer Station in Antarctica.
A person born with one abnormal copy of the gene for the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells, known as sickle cell trait, does not have sickle cell disease but is two times more likely to develop kidney failure requiring dialysis, according to a new study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
"Previous studies have shown that eating earlier in the day may help with weight loss and lower the risk of developing diabetes and heart disease. What this new study shows is that our biological clocks not only affect our metabolism but also what we choose to eat."
A great place to work… again: UAB Medicine has been named one of the “150 Great Places to Work in Healthcare” by Becker’s Hospital Review.
University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have discovered that endostatin, a naturally occurring protein in humans, can significantly decrease proliferation of castration-resistant prostate cells in culture, and in a recent paper in The FASEB Journal, they describe the physiological pathways and signaling evoked by endostatin.
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