Kerry Stein plays golf recreationally and participates annually in the UAB School of Optometry tournament to support the needs of the school — needs he understands well as a staunch supporter who happens to be blind.
Do you have questions about in vitro fertilization? UAB is hosting an educational session on Tuesday, April 22 to answer questions about IVF and share information about advancements in IVF technology.
Two UAB students have been named Goldwater Scholars for 2014 by the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship in Excellence in Education Foundation.
Recently there are extreme pressures on hospital budgets related to health care reforms, Medicare cuts, the lack of Medicaid expansion and Alabama's peculiar health-care landscape that are pushing hospitals, especially those in rural areas, to the brink.
Food concocting—or creating strange mixtures like pretzels covered in mayonnaise and salsa—is actually linked to binge eating behavior as well as intense negative self-perception, found one recent study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
Racial disparities in obesity rates among the third of U.S. adults considered obese are often blamed on socioeconomic status because of its influence on diet and physical activity, but new findings from the University of Alabama at Birmingham published in Obesity suggest otherwise—particularly for women.
Kerry Stein of Cahaba Heights has been blind since birth, is a fine golfer and a big supporter of UAB Optometry's annual golf tournament. Stein is involved with UAB's School of Optometry Board of Directors. He plays in the annual tournament which has raised $100,000 for a research fund, and three $25,000 scholarships to fund research and renovations for UAB's optometry school.
A UAB history professor who wrote a book describing how and why the so-called "Solid South" flipped its political allegiance from the Democratic Party to the Republican Party in the late 20th century has won a prize for his efforts.
“There has never been a more exciting time for our community and for UAB than now,” said UAB President Ray Watts. “We are placing a new emphasis on innovation and entrepreneurship to drive new revenue sources and to create new knowledge-based businesses and jobs in Birmingham.”
Mayor William Bell coming to UAB to talk K-12 STEM education 
Collat School of Business professor selected to travel to Cape Town, South Africa, as part of a prominent research and collaboration program.
Fredéric Gros to deliver April 26 Department of Foreign Languages & Literature lecture.
It’s time for the 10th annual Dean’s Community Advisory Committee’s golf tournament, which supports the needs of the school.
Enticed to UAB by a Computer Music Ensemble concert, Birmingham’s Kevin Peek is graduating with a music technology degree and an array of skills to make it in the music business.
Practice yoga under the strings and to the sounds of the Sonic Butterfly, which will turn the Alys Stephens Center into a giant musical instrument
The exhibition will feature works by Matthew Barton, Christina McCoo, Ryan Meyer, Mary Morgan, Kelsea Nichols and Haley Salzburn, and a free reception is set for May 1.
Observations on depression with insight gleaned from the laboratory and the clinic are the focus of the third UAB Neuroscience Café at the Hoover Library.
Fabric and installation artist Amanda Browder is enlisting the help of the community for two giant fabric installations at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, to celebrate the university's new cultural corridor.
Racial disparities in obesity rates among the third of U.S. adults considered obese are often blamed on socioeconomic status because of its influence on diet and physical activity, but new findings from the University of Alabama at Birmingham published in Obesity suggest otherwise — particularly for women.
Socioeconomic influences on diet and exercise are often blamed for racial disparities in obesity rates. But new findings at the University of Alabama at Birmingham published in Obesity suggest those assumptions may be false.
In his memoir ‘Positive,’ Michael Saag warns that our broken health care system is more dangerous than the AIDS epidemic.
Those passersby used to seeing Complex Vision, a highly visible sculpture outside of the Callahan Eye Hospital at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, may be blinking twice at the sculpture's absence.
Three UAB students are recognized by prestigious national scholarship program for academic excellence.


Complex Vision, a kinetic sculpture that has graced the Callahan Eye Hospital for 40 years, giving patients something pleasing to the eye, has been taken down for a refresh.
African-Americans have higher obesity rates than do whites, and while socioeconomic status is often believed to be the root cause, a new UAB study suggests other factors should be considered.
The Young Supporters Board (YSB) of the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center will host its annual Fiesta Ball fundraiser at B&A Warehouse downtown on Thursday, May 1, from 6-10 p.m.
The University of Alabama at Birmingham announced last month that it is building a new drug discovery center in order to develop drug treatments for viral infections with limited options for treatment. The UAB School of Medicine is leading the project to develop the Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Center (AD3C).
It's possible that teens who take longer to stop growing are exposed to growth hormones for longer periods, which may affect glioma risk, said study researcher Rebecca Little, a and doctoral student at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx will be in Birmingham Wednesday as UAB and the Birmingham Jefferson County Transit Authority present a new city bus powered by a hydrogen fuel cell.
Michael Saag, professor of medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and director of the Center for AIDS Research, received the award [Clinical Excellence Award at the National Physician of the Year Awards] at a ceremony at The Pierre Hotel.
Come out to West Campus for a free afternoon of fun with a Blazer Village and softball and football games presented by UAB Athletics. 
Parkinson’s disease awareness is highlighted with official recognition from Alabama and the city of Birmingham in April.
Andrew Demshuk to spend a year comparing cities rebuilt after World War II.
Students design award-winning device to help physically disabled.
The event will highlight genetic testing of embryos, the move toward transferring single embryos to avoid multiple births and UAB’s record success in IVF.

Local schools participated in 25th annual Egg Drop, held atop Vulcan for the first time.
“Poor body image is associated with both indoor tanning behavior and eating disorder behaviors,” David Schwebel, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, wrote in an accompanying editorial.
From: LiveScience
Teens who take longer to reach their full height may be at increased risk for certain types of brain tumors later in life, a new study suggests. It's possible that these people's bodies produce a lower level of growth hormones over a prolonged period, which may confer a higher risk of tumors than a higher level of growth hormones over a short period, said Rebecca Little, a  and doctoral student at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
Malcovery was launched as a result of an exclusive worldwide license with the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and based on research conducted at the UAB Center for Information Assurance and Joint Forensics Research (CIA|JFR).
A University of Alabama at Birmingham-developed viral treatment for brain cancer has passed another critical hurdle.
Several UAB art and art history students and faculty members recently took part in honoring four members of the Alabama Air National Guard who were killed during the ill-fated, CIA-backed attempt to invade Fidel Castro's Cuba at the Bay of Pigs in 1961. They painted new art on the nose of one of the planes flown by the Alabama Air National Guard's 117th Air Refueling Wing.
UAB is hosting its seventh annual undergraduate research expo. The event is a chance for students to present their scholarly work to faulty and the UAB community.
“The Irony of the Solid South,” Glenn Feldman’s book on the role of race in shaping the Republican South, receives award.
UAB PRCA/PRSA was named PRCA Chapter of the Year for the 30th time in the last 33 years.
Suffice it to say that Prine’s April 11 concert at Birmingham’s Alys Stephens Center was a two-hour gem.
From: Fox 6 Alabama
UAB's egg drop competition had 566 students invent a way to safely land an egg dropped approximately 100 feet from Vulcan onto the ground below.
Researchers don’t know how long any study participants were married or how recently they were divorced or became widowed. But the results drive home the message that a person’s heart risks can’t be judged by physical measures alone—social factors and stress also matter, said Vera Bittner, a cardiologist at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
That a good doctor-patient relationship can improve health outcomes has been shown before, for example in a study that showed diabetic patients are more successful at monitoring their blood sugar when their doctor is more empathetic, said Rodney Tucker, MD, chief experience officer for the University of Alabama at Birmingham Health System.
For Dr. Michael Saag, the director of the Center for AIDS Research at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, the new drugs eliminate the need to use interferon altogether. “I don’t plan on using interferon again unless I can help it,” he told IBT, pointing to the drug’s harsh side effects, toxicity and relative inefficacy.
From: U.S. News & World Report
"Poor body image is associated with both indoor tanning behavior and eating disorder behaviors," David Schwebel, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, wrote in an accompanying editorial.
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