Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
New ongoing research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Biology and School of Dentistry is showing more evidence that children may receive oral microbes from other, nonrelative children.
Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham report that the most common genetic cause of Parkinson’s disease, a mutant form of the LRRK2 enzyme, contributes to the build-up of α-synuclein in neurons — a telltale sign that the nerve cells are destined to die.
Two experimental drugs that block LRRK2 kinase enzyme were shown to lessen aggregations of alpha synuclein protein, which have been shown to play a role in the development of Parkinson's disease, report researchers at the University of Alabama Birmingham.
Kelly Nichols, O.D., Ph.D., a dry eye expert and dean of the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry, conducted research studies for the parent drug company to explore the efficacy and safety of lifitegrast in treating this eye condition that affects more than 16 million adults in the United States.
Zebrafish are becoming more and more popular as a research model for human disease. Along with mice and humans, they are one of the most commonly studied animals in biomedical research.
Wall Street meets University Boulevard in the UAB Green and Gold Fund, an investment portfolio of more than half a million dollars run entirely by Collat School of Business students. Discover how smart choices have paid off for the young investors, yielding rising returns, scholarship funds, and career experience.
The research team has shown that the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease — a mutant LRRK2 kinase enzyme — contributes to the formation of inclusions in neurons, resembling one of the hallmark pathologies seen in Parkinson's disease.
A new pilot trial at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is examining the potential of a surprising tool for treating cocaine addiction: the psychedelic compound psilocybin.
The University of Alabama at Birmingham has expanded its joint admissions program with Jefferson State Community College to include two new full-tuition scholarships, as well as a reverse transfer credit program.
Researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine set out to see if CFS symptoms truly were worse after some sort of physical exercise or strain.
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