Registration is open for summer camps ranging from forensic science to musical theater at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Many camps require registration and deposits in the spring, and are expected to fill up quickly. More camp announcements are expected; visit www.uab.edu/summer for updates.

Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
Battle over breakfast; when and what you should eat first.
he electronic health records meaningful use program has had a negligible effect on physician adoption of EHRs, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.
Through protocol-guided intensive medical therapy, clinicians were able to achieve simultaneous control of multiple risk factors in patients with diabetes and CHD, which led to reduced risk for death, MI and stroke, according to new findings from the BARI 2D study.
Much like the seemingly neverending arguments about the “eight glasses of water” rule or the “three meals a day” rule, researchers just can’t seem to make up their minds about whether or not breakfast is truly “the most important meal of the day.”
People who like fried food, sweet tea and other foods synonymous with the Southern United States may be at an increased risk of heart attack and death, according to a new study.
Fried foods, processed meats, and sweetened beverages can lead to heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and more.
In an attempt to find out the reason the United States has the highest number of treatable sexually transmitted diseases in the world, a disease expert at the University of Alabama at Birmingham decided to study the doctor-patient relationship.
Getting lipids, triglycerides, glucose, blood pressure, and tobacco use under control was associated with substantially better outcomes in type 2 diabetes in an analysis of the BARI 2D trial.
People who like fried food, sweet tea and other foods synonymous with the Southern U.S. may be at an increased risk of heart attack and death, according to a new study.
People who regularly consumed a typical "Southern"-style diet had an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in a large study examining dietary patterns and heart risk -- more so than other diet types deemed unhealthy.
 
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