Registration is open for summer camps ranging from forensic science to musical theater at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Many camps require registration and deposits in the spring, and are expected to fill up quickly. More camp announcements are expected; visit www.uab.edu/summer for updates.

Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
People who regularly consumed a typical "Southern"-style diet had an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in a large study examining dietary patterns and heart risk -- more so than other diet types deemed unhealthy.
Southern favorites like fried chicken and bacon may taste great when consumed, but they can have negative effects on heart health, according to researchers.
People who eat lots of fried food and sugary drinks have a 56 percent higher risk of heart disease compared to those who eat healthier, according to US researchers.
We have heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. But recent research makes some wonder whether there's evidence to back up this well-worn saying.
Don't text while moving: Texting while walking has been found to be dangerously distracting, with people taking shorter strides and more time to finish an obstacle course in a study conducted by researchers.
It’s no secret that America’s air conditioning obsession is excessive, even out of control. (Europeans, for instance, think we’re fragile idiots.) But in addition to making us grumpier and less productive, freezing office environments could actually be making us eat more, too.
Reinforced panels that can turn any room in your home into a safe-room; that's the project that UAB is currently working on. They can withstand up to 250 mph winds, the equivalent of an EF-5 tornado.
Engineering interventions are necessary to reduce the frequency and extent of traffic congestion, said Virginia Sisiopiku, associate professor of transportation intervention at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
Texting and fielding math problems on the phones made people swerve more from side to side, but the difference wasn’t big enough to rule out the possibility that it was due to chance.
In a recent study, Dr. Stephen T. Mennemeyer, professor in the department of health care organization and policy at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, examined to what extent the MU program has impacted the adoption of EHR.
 
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