Each year UAB departments, schools and organizations present fun, educational and convenient summer camps. From foreign language to drama, visual arts to music, drumline and percussion, and writing to engineering, visit uab.edu/summer for the most up-to-date camp listings.


Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
Facebook and UAB consult with each other on what to research and even what to teach. And this is typical nowadays when corporations team up with colleges. Relationships are cozier and more targeted.
The Edge of Chaos announced last week that it is creating a new Scholars Program to bring together some of the finest minds at UAB to attack what the venue's web site calls the "wicked problems" that "plague communities" and are difficult to solve.
In the article titled "Birmingham's Health IT Breeding Ground," Ken Congdon wrote about his recent visit to Birmingham where he learned of UAB's and Innovation Depot's role in helping grow the health IT industry here.
From Diabetes In Control.com
"We made a lot of assumptions and jumped to a lot of conclusions that the markers of cardiovascular disease and treatments for prevention of cardiovascular diseases will be the same in type 1 — and that just may not be the case," said Fernando Ovalle, MD, director of the Comprehensive Diabetes Center of the University of Alabama at Birmingham. "This could potentially change the perspective on how we see the use of statins and the assessment of cardiovascular risk in general."
From WIAT.com
Dr. John Sloan, a Criminal Justice Professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham says prosecutors carry a heavy burden. Once police wrap up their reports and interviews, it is up to them to decide whether or not a child being left in a vehicle is a gross deviation from the expected standard of care or a tragic accident.
“Individuals with HCV are large users of outpatient, ED and inpatient services with increased and rising utilization by persons born between 1945 and 1965,” James Galbraith, MD, associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, told Infectious Disease News. “This not only presents a large economic burden on the health system, but more importantly highlights opportunities to identify these individuals and refer them to potentially curative treatment.”
"It's not very often that a new therapy comes along that has as much potential as this new, leadless pacemaker does," said Vance Plumb, M.D., professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiovascular Disease in the School of Medicine. "Historically, the weak link causing failure of pacing has been the leads, which this device eliminates. It's a big step forward in patient treatment and a milestone for cardiac rhythm treatment in Alabama."
Louis Brunsting, M.D, associate professor of surgery and chief of the Section of Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Massoud Leesar, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the Section of Interventional Cardiology, modified the procedure to take place over three days instead of all at one time to decrease the risk of bleeding a patient could endure due to blood-thinning medication taken prior to the stenting procedure.
Approved by University of Alabama System Board of Trustees last week, UAB is creating the Personalized Medicine Institute, the Institute for Informatics and the UAB-HudsonAlpha Center for Genomic Medicine.
The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) announced Tuesday it will establish a new Institute for Human Rights, one that school officials say can build on the Magic City's increasing reputation as a center for the study of civil rights and social justice.

Summer at UAB

 
 
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