Registration is open for summer camps ranging from forensic science to musical theater at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Many camps require registration and deposits in the spring, and are expected to fill up quickly. More camp announcements are expected; visit www.uab.edu/summer for updates.

Traci Bratton

Traci Bratton

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Contact:
(205) 934-2040
traci@uab.edu 
Experts say they do not know whether efforts to prevent diabetes have finally started to work, or if the disease has simply peaked in the population.
If it remains very high over time with multiple measurements, there is no mistaking the diagnosis of hypertension.
Scientific breakthroughs can change the world—but only if they can break out of the lab first. Students in UAB’s biotechnology master’s program capitalize on UAB discoveries by translating them into new medical treatments and potential start-up companies. See how a mix of scientific knowledge and business sense helps them do it.
A drug that might help older adults regrow muscle is under investigation at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. UAB is recruiting healthy adults age 65 and older for a study combining strength training exercise with the anti-diabetes drug metformin.
Buildup of the amyloid beta protein clumps could harm the brain in multiple ways, according to a team from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
They suggest people with other types of infections and identical gene mutations also may be prone to the disorder, known as reactive HLH (rHLH), or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.
A UAB/Children’s of Alabama/Cincinnati Children’s study finds genetic risk for fatal inflammatory disorder linked to viral infection.
Fond memories of chemotherapy nurses make 15-year-old Pell City High School student want to become one.
When Brad Spencer, CEO of Blondin Bioscience, a University of Alabama at Birmingham-related startup, called to let us know he was ready to apply for accounting compliance assistance through the Alabama Launchpad Phase 0 program, you could hear the excitement in his voice.
Citing a study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Health Professions, the task force found that expanding Medicaid would provide coverage for 290,000 Alabamians, including 185,000 who are currently employed.
 
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