UAB’s School of Dentistry has ranked first in NIDCR funding since 2012.
UAB doctoral student Ajaya Neupane awarded highly competitive $50,000 fellowship to continue research using neuroimaging devices to examine internet users’ susceptibility to cyberattacks.
Published in Student Experience
Failure of hormone deprivation therapy used to slow prostate cancer in patients leads to castration-resistant prostate cancer, a lethal form of advanced disease with limited treatment options. Endostatin, used in combination therapy, may help delay onset of castration-resistant disease.
New data from the REGARDS study show that blacks with the sickle cell trait are more likely to develop kidney failure requiring dialysis.
UAB launches the Alabama Genomic Health Initiative, a statewide effort to use the power of genomics to improve health in Alabama.
The findings suggest targeting specific T-cell subsets may be a therapeutic approach to prevent heart failure after a heart attack.
A 90-ton machine called a cyclotron will accelerate protons to very high speeds to impact human tumors.
The function and structure of protein GARP2 in rod cells of the retina is still not clear, but researchers have shown that GARP2 accelerates retinal degeneration in mice, and have made an important step toward creating a standardized nomenclature between mice and humans for a measurement of retinal degeneration.
Tuberculosis kills 1.8 million people a year, and 10 million more are infected. Development of host-cell directed therapies that could restore cellular function during M. tuberculosis infection, such as a “release and kill” strategy, could shorten drug treatment of TB patients.
It appears that new cells compete to ‘win’ synapse connections away from old cells, which promotes network plasticity.
Research from UAB suggests that nearly half of children with the most common type of leukemia or their parents say they took more medications than they actually did.
The award recognizes a significant paper by Cui in Cell Death and Differentiation.
Published in Student Experience
UAB engineers will serve in a consortium of 10 Southeastern universities to develop novel strategies for traffic problems.
Abnormal antibody production that allows inflammation leading to AIDS is detected by analysis of antibodies in gut fluid of HIV-1-infected people.
In another example of precision medicine, UAB researchers have used IPF patients own lung tissue to create models to determine the most effective medication for that patient.
Cardiac muscle patches in this proof-of-concept research may represent an important step toward the clinical use of 3-D-printing technology, as researchers have grown heart tissue by seeding a mix of human cells onto a 1-micron-resolution scaffold made with a 3-D printer.
UAB and VICIS have each made major strides in developing next generation football helmets in response to the growing concussion crisis, and they have partnered to combine expertise and intellectual property to bring more effective helmets to the market.
A significant new study by The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, including a UAB physician-scientist, uncovers genetic mutations of cervical cancer that hold a key to targeting and treating the disease.
Thanks to the popular TV show Blacklist, America is becoming familiar with CRISPR, a revolutionary gene-editing tool. UAB scientists and students explain how it works — and how they are using these “molecular scissors” to cut a path toward genetic cures for sickle cell and brain diseases
David Kimberlin, M.D., vice chair of Pediatrics and co-director of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, is a physician at Children’s of Alabama. He is the editor of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Red Book, which establishes which vaccines should be given, when and to whom.
Published in Faculty Excellence
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